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Technology as a Policy Enabler. Edmond J. Thomas Office of Engineering and Technology. Spectrum Management. The Law Jurisdiction. FCC Statutory Mandate for New Technology. 47 USC 157. New technologies and services

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technology as a policy enabler

Technology as a Policy Enabler

Edmond J. Thomas

Office of Engineering and Technology

spectrum management
Spectrum Management
  • The Law
  • Jurisdiction

EJT

fcc statutory mandate for new technology
FCC Statutory Mandate forNew Technology
  • 47 USC 157. New technologies and services
    • (a) It shall be the policy of the United States to encourage the provision of new technologies and services to the public. Any person or party (other than the Commission) who opposes a new technology or service proposed to be permitted under this chapter shall have the burden to demonstrate that such proposal is inconsistent with the public interest.
    • (b) The Commission shall determine whether any new technology or service proposed in a petition or application is in the public interest within one year after such petition or application is filed. If the Commission initiates its own proceeding for a new technology or service, such proceeding shall be completed within 12 months after it is initiated.

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jurisdiction over the spectrum
Jurisdiction Over The Spectrum
  • Federal Communications Commission
    • Non-federal users
    • Commercial, private, state and local public safety
  • National Telecommunications and Information Administration (Dept. of Commerce)
    • Federal government users
  • Memorandum of Understanding
    • Joint Use Spectrum

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unlicensed devices
Unlicensed Devices

Bluetooth

Cordless Phones

Spread Spectrum

Wifi/802.11

Baby Monitors

Remote Entry

WLAN

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ultra wideband uwb
Ultra-Wideband (UWB)

30 kHz

Analog Cellular Voice Channel

6 MHz

TV Channel

28 - 100 MHz

Unlicensed Spread Spectrum Devices

1000 - 3000 MHz

Ultra-Wideband Devices

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ultra wideband uwb1
Ultra-wideband (UWB)

Policy Considerations

  • Interference
  • Federal vs. Non-Federal Spectrum Management
  • Licensed vs. Unlicensed

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ultra wideband uwb2
Ultra-Wideband (UWB)

Potential UWB Applications

  • Ground Penetrating Radars
  • Through-the-Wall Imaging Systems
  • Vehicular Radar Systems
  • Peer-to-Peer Communication Systems
  • Identification tags
  • Location tracking
  • Security systems
  • Short range voice, data and video

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ultra wideband uwb3
Ultra-wideband (UWB)
  • First Report and Order establishes different technical standards and operating restrictions for three types of UWB devices based on their potential to cause interference
      • Imaging Systems
      • Vehicular Radar Systems
      • Communication Systems

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slide11

UWB Emission Limits

GPRs, Wall Imaging, & Medical Imaging Systems

GPS Band

Operation is limited to law enforcement, fire and rescue organizations, scientific research institutions, commercial mining companies, and construction companies.

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slide12

UWB Emission Limits

Vehicular Radar Systems

GPS Band

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slide13

UWB Emission Limits

Indoor Communications Systems

/MHz

3.1

10.6

1.99

GPS Band

0.96

1.61

Equipment must be designed to ensure that operation can only occur indoors or it must consist of hand-held devices that may be employed for such activities as peer-to-peer operation.

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slide14

UWB Emission Limits

Outdoor Communication Systems

/MHz

3.1

10.6

1.99

3.1

10.6

1.99

GPS Band

0.96

1.61

Equipment must be hand-held.

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uwb testing measurement
UWB Testing/Measurement
  • Measurement of Ambient Emissions: Measure existing ambient RF emissions at typical and representative locations for comparison to UWB limit.
  • Measurement of Emissions from Existing Consumer Devices: Measure emissions from both intentional and unintentional electromagnetic radiators and compare data to UWB limits.

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slide16

Initial Results: Ambient NoiseOffice Space

Ambient levels are elevated by approximately 4-10 dB above the limit equivalent.

Peak

RMS

Equivalent Line

This plot depicts measured emissions in the GPS L1 frequency band (1575.42 ± 12 MHz) in the work area of a business that utilizes a large number of personal computers in an open area. Measurements made at FCC Laboratory in Columbia, MD August 2002

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slide17

Initial Results: Ambient NoiseLAN Server Room

Ambient levels vary between 6-18 dB above the limit equivalent.

Peak

RMS

Equivalent Line

This plot depicts measured emissions in the GPS L1 frequency band (1575.42 ± 12 MHz) in a mid-sized LAN server room where a high density of computer electronics were operating. Measurements made at FCC Laboratory in Columbia, MD August 2002

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slide18

Initial Results: Consumer DevicesDesktop Computer

RMS

Background Noise

Equivalent Line

This plot depicts the radiated emissions into the registered GPS L1 frequency band (1575.42 ± 12 MHz) from a state-of-the art desktop computer that is marketed by a leading manufacturer.

Measurements made at FCC Laboratory in Columbia, MD June 2002

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slide19

Initial Results: Consumer DevicesElectric Drill

Radiated emissions range from 2 dB below the UWB equivalent limit to spikes that are up to approximately 8 dB above the equivalent limit. These emissions are classified as incidental emissions and are observed to be impulsive in nature.

RMS

Equivalent Line

Background Noise

This plot depicts radiated emissions in the GPS L1 frequency band (1575.42 ± 12 MHz) from an electric drill at a distance of two meters, employing RMS averaging. UWB emission limit is assumed to be the most restrictive., i.e. limits defined for indoor systems in the 960-1610 MHz band. Measurements made at FCC Laboratory in Columbia, MD August 2002

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cognitive radios
Cognitive Radios

New Capabilities

  • Functions previously performed in hardware, such as, generation of transmitted radio signal, are performed in software
  • Can be programmed to operate on or with any frequency, any bandwidth, any modulation or transmission format

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cognitive radios1
Cognitive Radios

Characteristics

  • Frequency Agility
  • Power Emission Flexibility
  • Detection Capability
  • Spectrum Efficiency
  • GPS

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cognitive radios2
Cognitive Radios

Policy Considerations

  • Spectrum can be parceled in time, space, and frequency
    • In the past, we have licensed in space and frequency
    • Technology is now providing the time dimension
  • Facilitate interoperability, ie. Public safety
  • Promote secondary markets

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power line carrier technology
Power Line Carrier Technology
  • Possible new option for broadband to the home (“last mile”)
  • Examine potential rule changes to facilitate deployment
  • Protect incumbent spectrum users from spurious emissions
  • Establish rules and test procedures

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spectrum policy task force
Spectrum Policy Task Force
  • Led by Office of Engineering & Technology
  • Public Input
  • Findings and Recommendations

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spectrum policy task force1
Spectrum Policy Task Force
  • June 2002 – Formation of Task Force
  • June 2002 – Public Notice
  • August 2002 – Public Workshops
    • Unlicensed Devices and Experimental Licenses
    • Interference Protection
    • Spectrum Efficiency
    • Spectrum Rights and Responsibilities
  • November 2002 – Task Force Report Issued

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spectrum policy task force2
Spectrum Policy Task Force

Principal Findings:

  • Spectrum access is a much more significant problem than scarcity
  • Spectrum can be parceled in space/power, frequency, and time
  • Technology is allowing systems to be much smarter and more tolerant to interference than in the past
  • Spectrum rights and responsibilities are not always clearly defined
  • Migrate to an exclusive and commons models whenever possible, except when there are compelling public interest reasons to use the command-and-control model

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fcc 2003 spectrum task force agenda
FCC 2003 Spectrum Task Force Agenda
  • Unlicensed PN
  • Receiver Standards NOI
  • Secondary Markets
  • Additional 255 MHz. Unlicensed Spectrum @ 5.8 GHz.
  • Cognitive Radio
  • Noise Temperature
  • 30 MHz. @ 2 GHz. Re-allocation

EJT