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  1. Strategic Planning for CommunitiesPart 1 Tracy Johnson April 20, 2007

  2. Workshop Objectives • Overview of Strategic Prevention Framework • Need/Capacity Assessment Review • Engaging Partners • Developing a Vision Statement • Developing a Problem Statement

  3. How Can We Create a Comprehensive Plan? By using SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) which outlines the elements that should be included in a comprehensive planning model.

  4. SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention FrameworkSupports Accountability, Capacity, and Effectiveness Assessment Profile population needs, resources, and readiness to address needs and gaps Capacity Mobilize and/or build capacity to address needs Planning Develop a Comprehensive Strategic Plan Implementation Implement evidence-based prevention programs and activities Evaluation Monitor, evaluate, sustain, and improve or replace those that fail

  5. Focus of the Strategic Prevention Framework • Community development • Strategic planning • The change process at the community level

  6. The SPF Principles • Prevention is a continuum • Prevention is prevention is prevention • Successful prevention decreases risk factors and enhances protective factors • Prevention requires adoption of known effective prevention practices within a framework that works

  7. The SPF Principles(continued) • Systems of prevention services work better than service silos • Common data sets across service systems can help assess prevention efficacy and promote accountability • Recognizes the importance of States and communities • Comprehensively address substance abuse

  8. Outcomes-based Prevention • Effective prevention is grounded in a solid understanding ofalcohol tobacco and other drug consumption and consequence patterns • Documenting the nature and extent of consumption (e.g., underage drinking) and consequences (motor-vehicle crashes) at the start is critical for determining intervening variables and aligning strategies to address them

  9. Substance-related Consumption Patterns • Overall consumption • Acute heavy consumption • Consumption in risky situations • Drinking and driving • Smoking around young children • Consumption by populations/groups • Youth, college students, older adults • Pregnant women

  10. SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention FrameworkSupports Accountability, Capacity, and Effectiveness Cultural competence and sustainability are at the center of the Strategic Prevention Framework because they are integral to each step of the framework Two Common Threads Throughout the Strategic Prevention Framework

  11. Cultural Competence Can be defined as “a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes and policies that come together in system, agency or among professionals and enable that system agency or those professionals to work effectively in cross-cultural situations.” (The Lewin Group, 2002) Identified 7 Domains that reflect cultural competence- page 3.28

  12. Cultural Competence IndicatorsImmediate • Mission Statement addresses Cultural Competence. • Strategic Plan addresses Cultural Competence, including a Cultural Competence Plan. • Integration and implementation of Cultural Competence Plan • Reports to stakeholders on Cultural Competence activities/Issues • Monitoring and evaluation reports related to Cultural Competence.

  13. Cultural Competence IndicatorsImmediate • Conducts regular community/needs assessments including specific sub-populations if needed • Membership on relevant planning committees of community participants that represent groups served • Resources and capacity to collect/manage/report cultural competence-related information/data • Process for obtaining client/community input in the development of cultural competence-related plans • Participant satisfaction regarding cultural competence-related planning and Service Delivery • Staff satisfaction regarding cultural competence-related planning and service delivery

  14. The SPF and Sustainability • Sustainability is “the process of ensuring an adaptive and effective substance abuse prevention system that achieves long term results that benefit a focus population” (Johnson, Hays, Center, and Daley, 2004). • Applies to more than funding • Sustaining outcomes, not programs • Think sustainability from the beginning • Look to the system to sustain outcomes • Sustain prevention by making it everyone’s job!

  15. Prevention Planning Why create a plan for action? Planning allows us to create an objective profile of our community, identify how to focus resources and efforts, and to implement more effective strategies

  16. Focus for Communities • Across the lifespan (not just youth) • Consumption and consequences (prevent the problem associated with use) • Outcomes measured at the population level (not just program level) • Based on evidence-based research/empirical data • Appear on a Federal list • Appear in a peer-reviewed journal as effective • Demonstrate “documented effectiveness” in some other way. (Presently being clarified by SAMHSA/CSAP.)

  17. SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention FrameworkSupports Accountability, Capacity, and Effectiveness Assessment Profile population needs, resources, and readiness to address needs and gaps Capacity Mobilize and/or build capacity to address needs Planning Develop a Comprehensive Strategic Plan Implementation Implement evidence-based prevention programs and activities Evaluation Monitor, evaluate, sustain, and improve or replace those that fail

  18. Needs/Capacity Assessment Refresher How to gather community data?

  19. Step 1 – Assessment What is Assessment? • Assessment of substance use and related problems of substance use Assessment requires us to explore rates and patterns of ATOD use and abuse as well as related problems (consequences). • Prevalence data • Incidence data • Consequence data • Assessment of resources, gaps, and readiness • Leads to recommendations regarding community priorities

  20. Why do we need to do an assessment? • It answers the question, “What is going on in my community?” • More specifically, it identifies: • How big and what type of a substance use problem do I have in my community? • What resources currently exist in my community that are addressing the identified problems related to substance abuse? • What is supporting the substance abuse problem in my community? • How ready is my community for prevention?

  21. How do I conduct an assessment? • Create a needs assessment profile • Define your community and Mobilize your community • Assess available resources and gaps in services • Implement a community readiness tool

  22. What Is Community Readiness and Why Is It Important?Community readiness is the extent to which a community is adequately prepared to implement a substance abuse prevention program. A community must have the support and commitment of its members along with needed resources to implement an effective prevention effort. Because community readiness is a process, factors associated with it can be objectively assessed and systematically enhanced. (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1997)

  23. Why Increase Community Readiness? Effectiveness Enduring, coordinated, and comprehensive efforts at the local level are more likely to have the desired impact if prevention professionals work with local citizens and community leaders from many segments of the community in planning, coordinating, and implementing the prevention effort. Continuity Prevention programs are more likely to succeed and continue to operate when they are created by local citizens and tailored to the needs and resources of the local community.

  24. Community A Community B

  25. Background •Growing awareness among prevention practitioners that understanding a community’s level of readiness is key to implementing successful substance abuse prevention strategies • Three components of needs assessment: 1. Knowledge of actual substance use rates in the community 2. Prevention resource infrastructure in the community 3. Residents’ attitudes and community norms Minnesota Institute of Public Health, Mounds View, MN

  26. Readiness Assessment Tools • Community Readiness Survey, Tri-Ethnic Center for Prevention Research (www.triethniccenter.colostate.com) • Community Readiness Survey, MIPH • Organizational Readiness for Change, Lehman, Greener and Simpson • Community Readiness Inventory (NIDA)

  27. Using Findings from the Community Readiness Survey Identify prevention strategies appropriate to residents’ attitudes • Select strategies appropriate to residents’ attitudes • Select strategies easily understood by residents • Inform community leaders about respondents’ attitudes Inform general public about respondents’ attitudes. Inform community leaders about respondents’ attitudes.

  28. Steps to Changing Behavior Increase Awareness Change in Attitude Change in Behavior

  29. Questions to Consider • Has your community used ATOD consequence data in the past as part of its Assessment process? • Is community level consequence data readily available? What is the utility of the currently available data? • How does community readiness impact prevention planning and interventions?

  30. Questions to Consider • What seems to influence the prevalence rates of use? (risk and protective factors) • Once you have completed an assessment, how much more refined will your target population be? • Do you anticipate that your target population will change through the assessment?

  31. SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention FrameworkSupports Accountability, Capacity, and Effectiveness Assessment Profile population needs, resources, and readiness to address needs and gaps Capacity Mobilize and/or build capacity to address needs Planning Develop a Comprehensive Strategic Plan Implementation Implement evidence-based prevention programs and activities Evaluation Monitor, evaluate, sustain, and improve or replace those that fail

  32. Step 2 – Capacity: What is it? Types and levels of resources needed to address identified needs including: • Human resources • Technical resources • Management and Evaluation Resources • Financial resources

  33. Capacity: Why Is it Important? The resources, people, partnerships, coalitions, and skills are essential to the successful implementation of prevention plans

  34. Capacity: What does it involve? • Mobilizing resources • Engaging stakeholders • Partnerships with the community • Building coalitions • Developing readiness • Focus on cultural competency, sustainability and evaluation

  35. Capacity: Resources and Gaps Resources and gaps in resources is a coalitions capacity to engage in prevention efforts: Examples of capacity include: • Number of community organizations collaborating on addressing ATOD-related problems • Leadership within the coalition and the community to engage in solving ATOD and other related problems • Prevention knowledge at the community level • Resources that are allocated and available to address ATOD problems

  36. Questions to Consider • What type of prevention intervention planning has occurred in your community in the past? • What types of resources will your community need in order to develop a strategic plan?

  37. Why Assess Capacities? • Will help make a realistic match between the needs identified and the capacities (e.g. infrastructure, funding, etc.) necessary to address them. • Will reveal strengths and shortfalls in key resource categories (e.g. human, fiscal, technical, community collaboration). • Will provide an opportunity to address any shortfalls in advance.

  38. Who Watched These? What is the correct order of the first year they appeared on TV. ?

  39. 1 2 3 4 5 6 66 70 74 75 79 89

  40. Priorities for Sale How to assemble , engage, and get buy in from a planning team?

  41. Assembling, Engaging and Getting Buy in of a Team • Set Your Sights missions, values, goals, or resources are in line with your prevention strategy. • Get Started ongoing process • Make Contact by sharing information materials, lessons learned, eval. report) • Become Known attend receptions, forums, conferences, and committee meetings

  42. Assembling, Engaging and Getting Buy in of a Team • Be Heard Most listeners will not digest more than a few major points. Develop a script; • Gain Agreement All partners need to understand and agree on their roles. So, put agreements in writing. • Join Forces As you begin recruiting partners, you may discover that some local agencies and organizations are involved in similar prevention efforts

  43. Assembling, Engaging and Getting Buy in of a Team • Networking or communication links Minimal involvement (mainly to share information) • Publicity Partners may serve as channels, or go-betweens, to help spread information • Endorsement Partners publicly endorse each other's programs to broaden appeal or lend credibility

  44. Assembling, Engaging and Getting Buy in of a Team • Coordination Partners remain self-directed but conduct mutually beneficial activities and work together with a common purpose • Co-sponsorship Partners share their resources • Collaboration Partners work together from beginning to end to create a vision and to carry out a program

  45. Assembling, Engaging and Getting Buy in of a Team • Defining a shared mission, vision, and goals. • Maintaining a high level of trust and mutual respect. • Making decisions jointly. • Contributing staff time and other resources.

  46. Assembling, Engaging and Getting Buy in of a Team • Committing to build knowledge, skills, and systems by seeking or offering technical assistance • Staying in close contact with a partner, • Listening carefully to what is communicated and. providing regular and consistent feedback, • Encouragement, guidance, and recognition help to sustain partnership

  47. Questions to Consider • Who are some of the key stakeholders in your community? • Are all of the key stakeholders actively involved in planning and implementing successful prevention interventions? • Who is involved in evaluating the capacity to meet identified needs? • Is cultural competence deliberately assessed as part of current capacity evaluations?

  48. Kinds of Coalitions Distinctions by: • Structure—centralized, decentralized • Geography—single community, multi-community • Resources—funded coalitions, non-funded coalitions • Also: Coalitions of interest (affinity groups)

  49. Common coalition questions spoken and unspoken • Why are members leaving? • We have ownership issues, who makes the decisions? • How can we have a more diverse membership • How can we get more people involved? • How will we know we were successful?

  50. Community Prevention Systems • Bring the power of individual citizens and institutions together • Create a comprehensive plan that everyone in the community has a stake in and owns • Hold community institutions accountable