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Reflective Teaching Practices. Effective Teaching & Learning Department. “ Classrooms, unlike the rooms in which ballerinas practice, have no mirrors.” Eisner, 1998, p.160. Objectives. Practice reflection, using journal from previous quarter Identify the purpose of reflective teaching

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Reflective Teaching Practices


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    1. Reflective Teaching Practices Effective Teaching & Learning Department

    2. “Classrooms, unlike the rooms in which ballerinas practice, have no mirrors.” Eisner, 1998, p.160

    3. Objectives • Practice reflection, using journal from previous quarter • Identify the purpose of reflective teaching • Discuss the importance of data collection to improve reflective practice and provide examples • Review the process of critical reflection of practice

    4. Activity Danielson (2007) What worked well each class session? What didn’t work? What will you change going forward the next time you teach this course?

    5. Reflective teaching practice is essential because it: • Embraces a willingness to alter content and practice • Provides a framework for on-going assessment of pedagogy • Relies upon the teacher developing knowledge about how students learn • Models the metacognition we would want for our students

    6. Becoming critically reflective…Brookfield’s Four Lenses • Autobiography • Students’ Eyes • Colleagues’ Experiences • Theoretical Literature

    7. The Classroom Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ) • Developed by Stephen Brookfield (1995) • Can be used to provide repeated, anonymous opportunities for learners to reflect on regular learnings or “critical incidents” • Comprised of five open-ended questions that ask learners about: • The most engaging and distancing moments • The most affirming and confusing actions • The most surprising moments in the classroom

    8. Brainstorming Activity • Form a group of 4 or 5 • On the sheet provided • Identify as many ways the CIQ can be integrated into the classroom • Identify benefits of the CIQ (prompts are provided) • Be prepared to share some of your responses

    9. Analyzing and responding to data from the CIQ… • Look for common themes • Look for comments that indicate problems or confusions • Address issues publicly at the next class meeting • Clarify anything that needs further clarification • Debrief students on the main themes that emerged • Acknowledge any changes to teaching style made as a result of student comments

    10. “As you reflect, remember to respect and have faith in yourself and to trust the process.  Reflection is just that, a process.  Uncertainty is necessary for change to occur. Allowing yourself the time to reflect is a gift to give to yourself.  You might not arrive at answers, but will open yourself up to more questions.  This, in turn, will encourage you to continue the reflective process.” (Taken, in part, from Writing as a Reflective Practitioner with Wisdom by Gillie Bolton) (Taken, in part, from Writing as a Reflective Practitioner with Wisdom by Gillie Bolton)

    11. Are You a Reflective Practitioner? • Do you provide clear objectives for your students? • Do you offer less direction as your students learn more? • Are your class discussions focused on how knowledge has been created or on the learner and the purpose of the learning? • Do you adapt your knowledge to learners' levels of understanding and ways of thinking?

    12. Are You a Reflective Practitioner? • Do you challenge your students to do their best by creating a climate of caring and trust? • What is your biggest weakness as a teacher? • What is your greatest strength? • How can you improve the weakest elements of your teaching without compromising your areas of strength?

    13. Activity: Self-Reflection • Get a copy of the survey from the facilitator • Take a few minutes to respond • Check your score • Reflect on the following question: What do you want to change going forward in your teaching?

    14. Questions?