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  1. Learning beyond lecturesUsing VLE groups and organizations to encourage student engagement • Dr. Sarah Underwood • & Catherine Bell • UoL L&T Conference 2011

  2. Welcome Dr. Sarah Underwood Lecturer in Enterprise Omair Jamal LEC Virtual Intern Catherine Bell LUBS E-learning officer With thanks to Liam Patterson (LEC intern Summer 2010), Alex Edwards & Laura Paraskeva (current VLE interns)

  3. Objectives Rationale for project Moving from tutor-led to student-led VLE group areas Developing the Leeds Enterprise Centre Organization Introducing our Virtual Interns

  4. LEC modules are designed to help students enhance transferrable skills that top employers are seeking in graduates. For example: Organisation & Planning, Communication skills, Networking, Team working, Creative thinking, Innovative ideas, Adaptability, Leadership, Negotiation Leeds Enterprise Centre

  5. Enterprise Curriculum Suite of Enterprise elective offered to all undergraduate students

  6. Our ‘education philosophy’ Plan Network Negotiate Evaluate Mine Others

  7. Research into VLE usage… Tutors using the VLE to • Compliment classroom work encourages independent and deep learning • Disseminate/repeat information, encourages students to develop a dependent and surface approach to learning (Biggs, 1999; Love & Fry, 2006) Student engagement with the VLE has the potential to • increase their motivation (Kozma, 1991; Reeves, 1997; De Lange et al,2003) • result in improved academic outcomes (Richardson, 2000; Kember, 1995, Tinto, 1993)

  8. From our own research… (Survey of 100 undergraduate students) A positive perception towards learning using the VLE - 97% find the VLE very useful or fairly useful The VLE is also regularly accessed - 82% accessing the VLE 2-3 times a week or more

  9. Moving from tutor-led to student-led VLE group areas

  10. VLE Facilitated Group Projects

  11. Continued engagement… Christmas day

  12. Developing the Leeds Enterprise Centre Organization An extension of the group areas Facilitating exchange that spans modules and year groups

  13. Introducing our Virtual Interns ~ 2 hours per week Remote working Purpose of role: To promote the use of, and generate interest in, the LEC VLE organisation To contribute to forum discussions relating to enterprise topics Signposting relevant information available online or within the University

  14. Developing the Leeds Enterprise Centre Organization Please navigate to your VLE homepage and select the Leeds Enterprise Centre organisation

  15. Points of interest (?) 1. 2. 3. 4.

  16. Transferability… • Group areas can be used to support a range of different learning outcomes • have applicability across all modules (in any department) • Does the use of a VLE organisation to connect otherwise unlinked modules increase student engagement….? • Watch this space!

  17. Thank you!

  18. References Biggs, J. B. (1999) Teaching for Quality Learning (Buckingham: SRHE and Open University Press). De Lang, P. et al (2003) Integrating a virtual learning environment Into an introductory journal, 12 (1), pp. 1-14. Kember, D. (1995) Open Learning Courses for Adults: A model of student progress (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications) Kozma, R. B. (1991) Learning with media, Review of Educational Research, 61(2), pp. 179-211. Love, N. Fry, N. (2006) Accounting Students’ Perceptions of a Virtual Learning Environment: Springboard or Safety Net?. Accounting Education: an international Journal Vol. 15, No. 2, 151-166. University of the West of England, Bristol, UK Reeves,T. (1997) Evaluating what really matters in computer based education, as at http://educationau.edu/archives/cp/reeves.htm Richardson, J.T. (2000) Researching Student Learning: Approaches to Studying in Campus Based and Distance Education (Buckingham: SRHE and Open University Press). Tinto, V. (1993) Leaving college: Rethinking the courses and curse of student attrition, 2nd Ed (New York: Harper Collins Publishers).