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“Oops, I should have retired five years ago!”. Dementia warnings and retirement considerations. The Good, the Bad, and the ??? (I just can’t remember.). Dementia. Memory loss Loss of other thinking skills (language, orientation, judgment, etc.)

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oops i should have retired five years ago

“Oops, I should have retired five years ago!”

Dementia warnings and retirement considerations.

dementia
Dementia
  • Memory loss
  • Loss of other thinking skills (language, orientation, judgment, etc.)
  • Severe enough to impair abilities to perform everyday tasks
  • Represents a decline from previous functioning
some potential causes of dementia
Some potential causes of dementia
  • Degenerative
  • Vascular
  • Metabolic/endocrine
  • Nutritional
  • Toxic
  • Infectious
  • Structural
things that can be mistaken for dementia
Things that can be mistaken for dementia
  • Depression
  • Delirium
  • Substance intoxication or withdrawal
  • Chronic schizophrenia
  • Severe sensory handicap
alzheimer s disease is the most common form of dementia approximately 2 3 of all cases
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia (approximately 2/3 of all cases).
  • Approximately 4 million Americans suffer from dementia
  • 5% of all individuals over age 65
  • Almost half of people over age 85
warning signs of alzheimer s disease
Warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease
  • Difficulty performing familiar tasks
  • Problems with language
  • Disorientation
  • Decreased judgment
  • Memory loss
  • Problems with abstract thinking
  • Misplacing items
  • Changes in mood or behavior
  • Personality changes
  • Loss of initiative
diagnosis
Diagnosis
  • History
  • Physical and neurological exam
  • Neuropsychological testing
  • Blood tests
  • Brain scans
treatment
Treatment
  • Aricept, Exelon, or Reminyl
  • Antidepressants
  • Anti-anxiety medications
  • Vitamin E
issues
Issues
  • Job performance
  • Driving
  • Management of financial affairs
  • Management of personal affairs
  • Wandering
  • Nursing home
increased longevity
Increased Longevity
  • In 1900, the average life expectancy at birth for a newborn baby was roughly 47years.
  • Presently, it is 74 for men and 81 for women.
  • During most of human history, only one in ten people lived to the age of 65.
  • In contemporary America, 8:10 people live past their 65th birthday.
extended high functioning
Extended high functioning
  • Not only are we living longer, we are maintaining a higher level of physical health and mental functioning as we age.
  • We are experiencing physiological old age later in life.
retirement
Retirement
  • In 1900, Americans lived 1.2 years in retirement;
  • In 1997, they averaged 17 years in retirement;
  • With life expectancies increasing, more people will live 20 years in retirement.
slide14

Lawyer Retirement Survey, Oregon State Bar 11% of the lawyers surveyed do not plan to ever retire. They plan to continue to practice full-time or part-time until they die or are no longer capable of practicing.

lawyer retirement survey
Lawyer Retirement Survey
  • 30% plan to continue practicing law part-time after age 65 mainly for the stimulation, sense of purpose, and satisfaction it provides.
  • 11% plan to continue practicing law part-time after age 65 primarily for the income it will provide.
lawyer retirement survey16
Lawyer Retirement Survey
  • 18% of lawyers surveyed plan to retire completely and no longer work for pay by age 65;
  • almost 60% plan to do so by age 70;
  • about 40% plan to continue to practice law or work after age 70.
slide17

Hopes and Dreams 71 % of lawyers envision retirement as a time to begin a new chapter in life.

ending losses
Ending & losses
  • Usefulness & value
  • Intellectual stimulation
  • Loss of daily structure
  • Earned income
  • Loss of identity
maintaining a social network
Maintaining a social network

A University of Michigan study of 100 recent retirees reported that the most powerful predictor of life satisfaction after retirement was the size of a person’s social network.

special thanks to
Special thanks to:
  • Mike Long, Oregon Attorney Assistance Program
  • Pat Funk, Oregon Attorney Assistance Program
  • Ann Marie Hake, M.D., Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Terry Harrel, Director, Indiana Judges and Lawyers Assistance Program
montana lawyer assistance program
Montana Lawyer Assistance Program
  • Mike Larson, Director
  • PO Box 1443, Dillon, MT 59725
  • 1-888-385-9119
  • mlarson@montanabar.org