seven question l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Seven question PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Seven question

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 10

Seven question - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 146 Views
  • Uploaded on

Seven question. Miriam Zukas Lifelong Learning Institute University of Leeds. The theorisation of employability The relationship of discipline to employment areas Theories of skill? Theories of learning? Assumptions of transfer

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Seven question


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
seven question

Seven question

Miriam Zukas

Lifelong Learning Institute

University of Leeds

slide2
The theorisation of employability
  • The relationship of discipline to employment areas
  • Theories of skill?
  • Theories of learning?
  • Assumptions of transfer
  • Relations between fields (education, employment) and habitus (including social, cultural, economic capital)
  • Institutional/employment rigging and ranking
theorisation of employability
Theorisation of employability

Brown, Hesketh and Williams (2003)

duality of employability:

absolute employability – do students have appropriate skills, knowledge and commitment to do the job in question?

relative employability – depends on supply and demand; eg 300,000 graduates for fewer than 15,000 elite jobs in 2001.

Employability=relative chances of acquiring and maintaining different kinds of employment

the relationship of discipline to employment areas
The relationship of discipline to employment areas

Clegg and Bradley (2006)

PDPs and ideal types:

employment (sport and leisure management, business studies)

professional (health and education)

academic (humanities, social sciences, parts of engineering)

Complex relationship too with pedagogic identities (Malcolm and Zukas, 2006)

theories of skill
Theories of skill?

Len Holmes (2001)

Graduate identity rather than employability? Link to performance and identity, rather than skill.

Knight and Yorke (2003)

Forget ad hoc initiatives (placements, PDPs, enterprise modules) and skill

USEM instead (understanding, skills, efficacy beliefs, metacognition)

Employability as process rather than goal

theories of learning
Theories of learning?

Assumes learning as acquisition of something (skill, employability)

If learning is participation (Sfard 1998), then employability emerges from legitimate peripheral participation in communities of practice (Lave and Wenger, 1991) – ie apprenticeship

assumptions of transfer
Assumptions of transfer

Tennant (1999) – three traditions:

Psychological tradition – transfer as tightly controlled and focused

Expertise tradition – domain-specific knowledge in expert performance

Situated learning perspectives – learning as ‘integral and inseparable aspect of social practice’ (Lave and Wenger 1991, p 31)

Reflection on action misconstrued – ‘the purpose is not to learn from talk as a substitute for legitimate peripheral participation; it is to learnt to talk as a key to legitimate peripheral participation’. (Lave and Wenger 1991, p 108-9)

slide8
Relations between fields (education, employment) and habitus (including social, cultural, economic capital)

Bourdieu

Hodkinson and Hodkinson

Colley and Hodkinson

Bowman

institutional employment rigging and ranking
Institutional/employment rigging and ranking

Brown, Hesketh and Williams (2003)

consensus theory;

conflict theory;

positional conflict theory:

institutional rigging and ranking

references
References

Bowman H (2005) ‘It’s a year and then that’s me: masters students’ decision-making’ Journal of Further and Higher Education 29(3) 233-249

Brown, P Hesketh A and S Williams (2003) ‘Employability in a knowledge-driven economy’, Jnl of Education and Work, 16(2) 107-126

Clegg, S and S Bradley (2006) ‘Models of personal development planning: practices and processes’, British Educational Research Journal 32(1) 57-76

Hodkinson, P et al (2005) http://www.tlrp.org/pub/documents/HodkinsonRBFinal.pdf

Holmes, L (2001) ‘Reconsidering graduate employability: the ‘graduate identity’ approach’ Quality in Higher Education 7 (2) 111-119

Knight, P T and M Yorke (2003) ‘Employability and good learning in higher education’, Teaching in Higher Education, 8 (1) 2003 3-15

Lave, J and E Wenger (1991) Situated learning: legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge University Press.

Malcolm, J and M Zukas (2006) ‘Pedagogic learning in the pedagogic workplace’ in R Edwards (ed) Learning outside the academy: international perspectives. Routledge

Sfard, A (1998) ‘On two metaphors for learning and the dangers for just choosing one’ Educational Researcher 27(2) 4-13

Tennant, M (1999) ‘Is transfer of learning possible?’ In D. Boud and J. Garrick (Eds) Understanding workplace learning. Routledge 165-179.