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Neurological disorders . Ashley Iafrate & Francesca Scalise. What is a neurological disorder?. A disorder of the nervous system Neurological disorders effect 3 main parts of the body: the brain, the spine and nerves . Neurological disorders .

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neurological disorders

Neurological disorders

Ashley Iafrate & Francesca Scalise

what is a neurological disorder
What is a neurological disorder?
  • A disorder of the nervous system
  • Neurological disorders effect 3 main parts of the body: the brain, the spine and nerves
neurological disorders1
Neurological disorders
  • These disorders include epilepsy, Alzheimer disease and other dementias, stroke, migraine and other
  • headache disorders, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, neuro-infections, brain tumours, traumatic disorders of the nervous system such as brain trauma, and neurological disorders as a result of malnutrition.
  • Hundreds of millions of people worldwide are effected by neurological disorders
  • What is the most common neurological disorder?
  • Alzheimer's disease
cerebral palsy
cerebral PALSY
  •  "Cerebral palsy" literally breaks down as cerebral = "of the brain" and palsy = "lack muscle control".
  • A lack of muscle control due to an injury to the developing brain.
equity understanding cerebral palsy
Equity- understanding cerebral palsy
  • Barriers to those with cerebral palsy:
  • Inaccessible buildings and transportation
  • Societal attitudes,
  • Exclusion from education
  • Exclusion from employment opportunities
  • When you meet someone with CP:
  • Language and attitudes are very important.
  • take a moment to determine how the individual communicates (symbol board, voice synthesizer etc.)
  • -For many people with CP the muscles around the mouth and throat can be challenging to control. Do not mistake slow, slurred or halting speech as an indication of someone’s' intelligence. It can be very frustrating for someone with CP to be 'talked down to' by their peers 
technology resources
Technology/resources
  • When you meet someone with CP:
  • Language and attitudes are very important.
  • take a moment to determine how the individual communicates (symbol board, voice synthesizer etc.)
  • For many people with CP the muscles around the mouth and throat can be challenging to control. Do not mistake slow, slurred or halting speech as an indication of someone’s' intelligence. It can be very frustrating for someone with CP to be 'talked down to' by their peers 

The speech synthesizer is a device that is used to translate text characters into sounds that approximate the sound of human speech

Communication boards are an inexpensive and practical mode by which an individual can communicate. This system does not involve any mechanical parts. A picture of an object (a hairbrush, a toy, food, or printed words) can represent what the person is attempting to say

community agency liaisons support
Community/Agency/Liaisons/Support
  • The Ontario Federation for Cerebral Palsy (OFCP) is an organization committed to supporting independence, inclusion, choice and full integration of all persons with cerebral palsy (CP) in Ontario.
  • At the provincial level, they improve the quality of life and wellbeing of persons with cerebral palsy in Ontario. 
  • Housing Fund provides financial support to assist Member Groups with the purchase of various forms of housing to accommodate persons with cerebral palsy.
  • Research Fund- Cures, causes, prevention, improved treatment and/or understanding of cerebral palsy. 
  • Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital is Canada’s largest children’s rehabilitation hospital. Our vision is to create a world of possibility for kids with disability.
slide8

What is Tourette’s Syndrome?

  • Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by tics: involuntary, rapid, sudden movements or vocalizations that occur repeatedly in the same way.
  • The cause has not been established and as yet there is no cure.
equity understanding tourette s
Equity- understanding Tourette's
  • As a teacher, we should be aware that:
  • students with Tourette’s syndrome may have different types of tics, it is important to know how they are classified.
  • Simple tics: sudden, brief movements that involve a limited number of muscle groups
  • Occur in a single or isolated fashion and are often repetitive (eye-blinking; shoulder shrugging; facial grimacing, head jerking; yelping and sniffling)
  • Also, teachers need to remember that other disabilities can occur with TS: Obsessive compulsive disorder, Attentive Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity (AD/HD), Learning Disabilities Sleep disorders
community agency liaisons support1
Community/Agency/Liaisons/Support
  • Tourette's Syndrome Foundation of Canada
  • Tourette Syndrome foundation of Ontario
  • Their mission is to identify the cause of, find the cure for and control the effects of Tourette Syndrome. 
  • Resources and referrals to help people and their families cope with the problems that occur with TS. 
  • Raise public awareness and counter media stereotypes about TS
  • Programs offered: Medical & Treatment/Science & Research, Education, Education Advocacy, various resources for adults and youth
resources technology
Resources/technology
  • Recording Devices Can Help Students Retain Information
  • Pre-Recording Class Presentations on Video Can Reduce Stress
  • Word Processors and Speech-to-Text Software Are Useful for Writing Tasks
  • Reader Software Makes Reading Easier for Students with Visual Tics
case study 1 cerebral palsy
Case study #1- cerebral palsy
  • Ralph is a grade 4 student . He has severe cerebral palsy;
  • therefore, he cannot speak, but uses a
  • communication board. Ralph has no cognitive
  • problems and is quite bright. He uses a wheelchair
  • and requires assistance to place his hands on the
  • controls.
    • What could you do to help Ralph`s learn more effectively in your class and in his other classes?
    • How would you accommodate Ralph`s needs?
    • How would you approach Ralph`s situation? (Appropriate etiquette)
case study 2 tourette s syndrom e
CASE STUDY #2: Tourette's syndrome
  • Jane is a 9 year old girl with Tourette's. She often makes
  • sniffling noises and shrugs her shoulders repeatedly
  • during class. During a test, students were complaining
  • about the noises she was making. As a teacher how
  • would you handle this situation?
  • What modifications/accommodations should be in place?
accommodations modifications tourette s syndrome
Accommodations & modifications- Tourette’s syndrome
  • Classroom Environment:
    • Use seating chart to allow for any movement tics
    • Eliminate all unnecessary items from the student’s desk to prevent
    • distractions
    • Have a duplicate set of text books for the child to keep at home
    • Use a study corral if needed
    • Give students ample notice that a transition is coming
    • Provide a written schedule on the desk of the student who has TS

Classroom Behaviors:

Sit the student with TS next to a responsible student so distractions are limited

Reward forgetful students for remembering rather than punish them for

forgetting

Ignore behaviors that are minimally disruptive

Provide modifications for behaviors that are disturbing (e.g. foam on desk if

they tap they tap their pencil, tennis balls on chair legs).

Have a code or private signal to use for the student when his/her behavior is

unacceptable

assessment
Assessment
  • Tests and Grading:
  • Give extra time to finish test or turn in homework if necessary
  • Reduce amount of work (e.g.: odd numbers or half the problems)
  • Allow extra time, read the test to them, allow oral responses
  • Provide movement breaks during the test if necessary
  • Part of the grade could be based on individual effort or improvement
accommodations modifications cerebral palsy
Accommodations & modifications- Cerebral palsy
  • Students who use wheelchairs, or crutches, or who tire easily, may find it difficult moving around the classroom
  • Academic activities which take place away from school (trips) may pose problems. Consider supplementary tasks, films, or videos as options to field trips.
  • Students with a mobility disability may sometimes wish to use their own furniture (sloped writing tables, various seating options)
  • Some students may need to use a tape recorder to take notes in older grades.
  • Extra time and deadline extensions
assessment1
Assessment
  • Students with a mobility disability may need particular adjustments to assessment tasks. Once you have a clear picture of how the disability impacts on performance you can consider alternative assessment strategies.
  • Oral examination (presenting answers on tape) is alternatives to the conventional written paper
  • Allow extra time for the student to listen to and refine or edit responses.
  • For some students the combination of written and oral examination will be most appropriate. Allow students to write answer plans or make outline notes, but then to answer the question orally.
  • Students may need to use a personal computer or a personal assistant in an examination.
  • Allow extensions to assignment deadlines if extensive research involving physical activity (for example, frequent trips to the library or collection of data from dispersed locations) is required.