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Civics EOC Review – Part 1

Civics EOC Review – Part 1

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Civics EOC Review – Part 1

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  1. Civics EOC Review – Part 1 Test Bank Questions

  2. I feel ready for the Civics EOC? • Strongly Agree • Agree • Neutral • Disagree • Strongly Disagree

  3. Reporting Category 1 Origins and Purposes of Law and Government

  4. The image below concerns government. Which Enlightenment idea is represented by the image? • separation of powers • checks and balances • social contract • natural law SS.7.C.1.1

  5. The quote below is from a historical document. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.How does this quote reflect the influence of Enlightenment ideas on the Founding Fathers? • They had reservations about self-government. • They were concerned with property rights. • They supported individual liberties. • They created a limited monarchy. SS.7.C.1.1

  6. Below is a newspaper headline.Which Enlightenment idea is represented by the headline? • separation of powers • checks and balances • social contract • natural law SS.7.C.1.1

  7. Which right is an example of an Enlightenment idea? • Fifth Amendment self-incrimination protection • First Amendment freedom of speech guarantees • First Amendment freedom of religion guarantees • Fourth Amendment search and seizure protection SS.7.C.1.1

  8. How are the Enlightenment ideas that influenced the Founding Fathers reflected in modern institutions? • Colonies have been re-established to preserve popular sovereignty. • Oligarchies have increased to safeguard natural rights. • The United Nations promotes universal human rights. • The European Union encourages economic stability. SS.7.C.1.1

  9. The statements below are from the 1776 Virginia Declaration of Rights.Source: Public Domain / U.S. National Archives and Records AdministrationWhich statement reflects the Enlightenment ideas of government as expressed by Montesquieu? That in all capital or criminal prosecutions a man hath a right to demand . . .evidence in his favor, and to a speedy trial by an impartial jury . . . That the legislative, executive, and judiciary department shall be separateand distinct . . . That the freedom of the press is one of the great bulwarks of liberty, andcan never be restrained . . . That a well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trainedto arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state . . . • 1 • 2 • 3 • 4 SS.7.C.1.1

  10. Which idea is from the Magna Carta? • The people should be completely free from the government. • The people should support a strong central government. • The government should give people a fair and speedy trial. • The government should have unlimited power to tax. SS.7.C.1.2

  11. The conversation below concerns lawmaking. Doug: I believe in making laws only when everyone can participate in public decision making.Nicole: I disagree with you; it is best for laws to be made by the people who have been chosen for that purpose.Which colonial principle is being discussed? • limited monarchy • self-government • social contract • natural rights SS.7.C.1.2

  12. Below is a timeline. Which writing encourages the action demonstrated in the timeline? • Common Sense • U.S. Constitution • Mayflower Compact • Articles of Confederation SS.7.C.1.2

  13. The statements below are from the English Bill of Rights, 1689.That the pretended power of suspending laws … without consent of Parliament is illegal;That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted;And that for redress of all grievances, and for the amending, strengthening and preserving of the laws, Parliaments ought to be held frequently.Source: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration Which purpose of government can be traced to these statements? • provide for the common defense • promote the general welfare • ensure domestic tranquility • establish justice SS.7.C.1.2

  14. The passage below was written by Thomas Paine in his 1776 pamphlet, Common Sense.And as he hath shown himself such an … enemy to liberty, and discovered such a thirst for ... power, is he, or is he not, a proper man to say to these colonies, "You shall make no laws but what I please"?Source: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration Based on this passage, how is the author’s view reflected in the U.S. political system? • The monarchy creates limited government. • The monarchy supports self-government. • Representatives are appointed. • Representatives are elected. SS.7.C.1.2

  15. The diagram below shows that the colonists formed some of their political views from somehistorical documents.Which phrase completes the diagram? • separation of powers • economic freedom • self-government • individual rights SS.7.C.1.2

  16. Which document addressed colonial concerns about English policies? • Declaration of Independence • Mayflower Compact • U.S. Constitution • Bill of Rights SS.7.C.1.3

  17. The stamp below is from the front page of a 1765 newspaper. Source: Library of Congress What was the significance of the stamp on the newspaper? • It demonstrated that Parliament ignored the colonists’ media communications. • It demonstrated that Parliament controlled the colonists’ press outlets. • It represented the colonists’ opposition to English tax policies. • It represented the colonists’ fulfillment of English tax policies. SS.7.C.1.3

  18. The political cartoon below was created by Benjamin Franklin in1754.Source: Library of Congress Which action did colonists use this cartoon to support? • Declaring independence from the British monarchy. • Declaring loyalty to the British monarchy. • Dissolving colonial legislatures. • Dissolving colonial charters. SS.7.C.1.3

  19. The quotes below are from historical documents. What is the relationship between these concepts? • Both declare to the world why the colonists wanted freedom from England. • Both represent actions taken by the colonists to enforce English policies. • Both are in response to English policies imposed upon the colonists. • Both are responses by England to the actions of the colonists. SS.7.C.1.3

  20. Why did Parliament eventually repeal the Stamp Act, which taxed goods such as newspapers and playing cards? • The colonists established a blockade against British goods. • The colonists were able to produce their own goods. • The colonists started destroying British goods. • The colonists began boycotting British goods. SS.7.C.1.3

  21. The diagram below describes a cause that led to the writing of the Declaration of Independence.Which action completes the diagram? • Colonial agricultural trade increases. • Colonial religious devotion increases. • Colonial demand for political change increases. • Colonial demand for military assistance increases. SS.7.C.1.3

  22. The passage below is from a historical document.We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.Source: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration Which document contains this passage? • Declaration of Independence • Articles of Confederation • English Bill of Rights • U.S. Constitution SS.7.C.1.4

  23. The passage below is from a historical document.We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights....Source: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration What is the main idea of this passage? • Only citizens can enjoy the rights guaranteed by a government. • People have rights that cannot be denied by any government. • Government must equally distribute power among people. • Government is necessary to promote equality. SS.7.C.1.4

  24. The passage below is from a historical document....That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it....Source: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration Based on the passage, where should governments get their power? • from the legislative branch • from the executive branch • from elected leaders • from the public SS.7.C.1.4

  25. Below is a diagram. Which statement completes the diagram? • It is the role of government to determine natural rights. • It is the role of government to protect natural rights. • People establish natural rights. • People possess natural rights. SS.7.C.1.4

  26. What is one way that the ideas stated in the Declaration of Independence are evident today? • equal employment opportunities • voting rights amendments • selective service • term limits SS.7.C.1.4

  27. The passage below was written by Thomas Paine in his 1776 book, Common Sense.Based on this passage, with which complaint against the king from the Declaration ofIndependence would Thomas Paine agree? • persecuting immigrant groups • taking away religious rights • taking away political rights • persecuting racial groups SS.7.C.1.4

  28. The diagram below shows steps leading to a historical event.Which event completes the diagram? • Declaration of Independence • Articles of Confederation • Annapolis Convention • Whiskey Rebellion SS.7.C.1.5

  29. Which weakness of the Articles of Confederation led to Shays’s Rebellion? • The national government lacked the power to regulate trade. • The national government lacked a national court system. • The national government lacked central leadership. • The national government lacked the power to tax. SS.7.C.1.5

  30. What was the state-level response to Shays’s Rebellion? • Judicial protection against taxation without representation. • Taxes were declared unconstitutional. • Executive regulation of farm trade. • Debt relief was enacted. SS.7.C.1.5

  31. Why was the government’s authority to regulate commerce a weakness of the Articles of Confederation? • The president’s authority to collect taxes unfairly burdened the poor. • The national court system unfairly prosecuted trade laws. • The states’ authority to impose taxes decreased trade. • The legislature gave too much power to larger states. SS.7.C.1.5

  32. The passage below is from a historical document.Art. II. Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled. Source: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration How does the U.S. Constitution address concerns that resulted from the government described in this passage? • The new government could enforce treaties between the states. • The new government could settle disputes between the states. • The new government could regulate trade between the states. • The new government could levy taxes between the states. SS.7.C.1.5

  33. How did the U.S. Constitution solve a problem created by the Articles of Confederation? • It avoided the issue of states’ rights. • It allowed the states to elect representatives. • It prevented the amendment of federal laws. • It enabled the federal government to collect taxes. SS.7.C.1.5

  34. Which part of the U.S. Constitution states the six purposes of government? • Bill of Rights • Article IV • Preamble • Article I SS.7.C.1.6

  35. The statement below was made by President Lyndon B. Johnson during an address to the nation on March 31, 1968. I shall not seek, and I will not accept, the nomination of my party for another term as your President.Source: Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library Which intention of the Preamble is reflected in the statement? • Government holds frequent elections. • Government exists to serve the people. • Government promotes the general welfare. • Government provides for the common defense. SS.7.C.1.6

  36. Why did the Framers require that the U.S. House of Representatives have the sole power to introduce tax bills? • Laws are easier to debate and pass in the U.S. House of Representatives. • Members of the U.S. House of Representatives are directly elected by the people. • Elections are more frequent and expensive for the U.S. House of Representatives. • Members of the U.S. House of Representatives are required to have legal experience. SS.7.C.1.6

  37. This newspaper headline describes an event in U.S. history. Which government purpose identified in the Preamble is reflected in the headline? • ensure domestic tranquility • promote the general welfare • secure the blessings of liberty • provide for the common defense SS.7.C.1.6

  38. The statement below is from a historical document.We the People of the United States... do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.Source: Library of Congress How is this statement reflected in the modern American political system? • Voters elect Congress members. • The Electoral College elects Congress. • Congress enforces policies. • The president enacts policies. SS.7.C.1.6

  39. In the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution, what is the meaning of the phrase “We the People?” • The people express their will through political parties. • The people express their will by directly creating laws. • Government receives taxes from the people and exists to support them. • Government receives its power from the people and exists to serve them. SS.7.C.1.6

  40. What check does the U.S. Senate have on the president? • overriding vetoes • appointing judges • declaring laws unconstitutional • refusing to confirm appointments SS.7.C.1.7

  41. The statement below was written by John Adams in April 1776.A representation of the people in one assembly being obtained, a question arises, whether all the powers of government, legislative, executive, and judicial, shall be left in this body? I think a people cannot be long free, nor ever happy, whose government is in one assembly.Source: Thoughts on Government, Letter of John AdamsWhich basic principle of American government is John Adams describing in this statement? • separation of powers • individual rights • natural laws • civic virtue SS.7.C.1.7

  42. The table below describes several powers of the U.S. government.Which two principles are described in this table? • separation of powers and checks and balances • separation of powers and popular sovereignty • federalism and judicial review • federalism and republicanism SS.7.C.1.7

  43. Which principle does the U.S. Supreme Court apply when it declares an act of Congress unconstitutional? • separation of powers • checks and balances • advice and consent • executive privilege SS.7.C.1.7

  44. Which principle supports President Eisenhower’s action to uphold the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision that public schools should be integrated? • judicial review • checks and balances • separation of powers • constitutional government SS.7.C.1.7

  45. The passage below is from Federalist No. 47, written by James Madison in 1788.. . . Montesquieu was guided . . . in saying “There can be no liberty where thelegislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or body” . . . hedid not mean that these departments ought to have . . . no CONTROL over, theacts of each other.Source: Public Domain / Project GutenbergBased on this passage, which constitutional principle does Madison describe? • separation of powers • checks and balances • popular sovereignty • judicial review SS.7.C.1.7

  46. What was the Anti-Federalists’ greatest concern about ratifying the U.S. Constitution? • The lack of a federal court system. • The lack of legislative veto power. • The lack of a strong military. • The lack of a bill of rights. SS.7.C.1.8

  47. The table below shows views about government. What title completes the table? • Patriots and Loyalists • Federalists and Anti-Federalists • New Jersey Plan and Virginia Plan • Articles of Confederation and U.S. Constitution SS.7.C.1.8

  48. Why does the U.S. Supreme Court continue to debate states’ rights? • Because the Constitution can be amended. • Because the Constitution allows judicial review. • States’ rights are not mentioned in the Preamble. • States’ rights are not enumerated in the Bill of Rights. SS.7.C.1.8

  49. The statement below appeared in a 1787 essay by James Winthrop. Source: Letters of Agrippa, No. 4What does this statement reflect? • Federalist views • Anti-Federalist views • a cause of Shays’s Rebellion • a cause of the Great Compromise SS.7.C.1.8

  50. The passage below was written by James Madison in 1787.Extend the sphere, and you take in a greater variety of parties and interests; you make it less probable that a majority of the whole will have a common motive to invade the rights of other citizens;…Source: Federalist Paper #10Based on this passage, what change in modern political society would Madison support? • Expanding the size of the Cabinet. • Expanding the size of the Electoral College. • Expanding the number of candidates in campaigns. • Expanding the role of special interest groups in campaigns. SS.7.C.1.8