Crete Instruction Content Segments February 19, 2014 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Crete Instruction Content Segments February 19, 2014

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  1. Crete InstructionContent SegmentsFebruary 19, 2014 Toby Boss ESU 6

  2. Purpose • Review the MRL instructional model • Discuss Observation of Routines • Content Lesson Segments • DQ 2 Interacting with New Content • DQ 3 Practicing and Deepening • Plan activities for the next session

  3. Resources • http://creteinstruction.wikispaces.com/home • http://esu6craftknowledge.wikispaces.com

  4. “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” Alvin Toffler 2001 An American writer and futurist

  5. Great Educators…. • Are first and foremost learners who have a teachable spirit. • Are constantly looking to improve their skills in the craft of teaching and learning.

  6. The Complexity of Teaching • “After 30 years of doing such work, I have concluded that classroom teaching … is perhaps the most complex, most challenging, and most demanding, subtle, nuanced, and frightening activity that our species has ever invented. ..The only time a physician could possibly encounter a situation of comparable complexity would be in the emergency room of a hospital during or after a natural disaster” • Lee Shulman, The Wisdom of Practice

  7. “What Matters Very Much is Which Classroom?” “If a student is in one of the most effective classrooms, he/she will learn in 6 months what those in an average classroom will take a year to learn. And if a student is in one of the least effective classrooms in that school, the same amount of learning takes 2 years.” Deborah Loewenberg Ball, Dean of Education, University of Michigan

  8. Three Critical Interventions (COMMITMENTS) • A system of clear learning goals connected to student feedback and evaluation at the classroom, school, and district levels • Ensuring effective teaching in every classroom. • Building background knowledge for all students.

  9. What must a district or school do? • Develop a common language of teaching. • Provide opportunities for focused feedback and practice. • Provide opportunities for observing and discussing effective teaching. • Require individual teacher growth and development plans on a yearly basis.

  10. Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, 2007

  11. The Highly Engaged Classroom, 2011 pages 17-18 Fixed mindset: Talents are carved in stone Growth mindset: Qualities are things to be cultivated through effort and can change through application and experience Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success,2007

  12. Where should a school or district begin? • Develop a common language of teaching

  13. The Art & Science of Teaching 10 “design questions” teachers ask of themselves as they plan a unit of instruction.

  14. The Art and Science of Teaching

  15. Art and Science by the numbers • 41 instructional elements within… • 9 lesson design questions embedded in… • 3 segments for every lesson.

  16. ENACTED ON THE SPOT Student Engagement INVOLVES ROUTINES Learning Goals and Feedback Rules and Procedures ADDRESSES CONTENT IN SPECIFIC WAYS Teacher/Student Relationships Adherence to Rules and Procedures Interacting With New Knowledge Generating/ Testing Hypotheses Practicing and Deepening High Expectations

  17. The Art and Science of Teaching Learning Goals and Feedback Interacting with New Knowledge Practicing and Deepening Generating and Testing Hypotheses Student Engagement Establishing Rules and Procedures Adherence to Rules and Procedures Teacher-Student Relationships High Expectations Page 7, The Art & Science of Teaching

  18. Lesson Segments • “Thin slices” of instruction • Those involving routines • Those involving content • Those enacted on the spot

  19. The Art and Science of Teaching Routine Segments INVOLVES ROUTINES Learning Goals and Feedback Rules and Procedures

  20. Segments that are routine components of every lesson • Rules and procedures (Q 6) • Communicating learning goals (Q1) • Tracking student progress (Q1) • Celebrating success (Q1)

  21. Cognitive Routines • Critical for getting students to interact with content we want them to learn… • Cognitive routines are critical routines for learning at all ages…

  22. Cognitive Routines • Attention and Refocus Signal • Transition Signal • Strategies to group and re-group learners

  23. Reflection Discussion • How did you use the model for observations? • What routines did you observe? • What did you learn?

  24. ENACTED ON THE SPOT Student Engagement INVOLVES ROUTINES Learning Goals and Feedback Rules and Procedures ADDRESSES CONTENT IN SPECIFIC WAYS Teacher/Student Relationships Adherence to Rules and Procedures Interacting With New Knowledge Generating/ Testing Hypotheses Practicing and Deepening High Expectations

  25. The Art and Science of Teaching Content Segments ADDRESSES CONTENT IN SPECIFIC WAYS Interacting with New Knowledge Generating/ Testing Hypotheses Practicing and Deepening 25

  26. Content Segments • Interact with new knowledge • Practice and deepen content • Generate and test hypothesis

  27. The Art and Science of Teaching INVOLVES ROUTINES Learning Goals and Feedback Rules and Procedures ADDRESSES CONTENT IN SPECIFIC WAYS Interacting with New Knowledge

  28. If the segment involves new knowledge what do you expect to see? • Previewing activities • Identify critical information • Info presented in small chunks • Students processing each chunk in small groups • Students summarizing and taking notes after content has been introduced • Students reflecting on their learning

  29. Activity • Think about a unit you are going to teach in the next few weeks. • What will be the learning goal? • Consider how you will use the concepts we present with this learning goal.

  30. If the segment involves new knowledge what do you expect to see? • Previewing activities • Identify critical information • Info presented in small chunks • Students processing each chunk in small groups • Students summarizing and taking notes after content has been introduced • Students reflecting on their learning

  31. Previewing • Students work with content prior to actual formal presentation or critical input. • Important for those coming with little or no background knowledge.

  32. Graphic “Advanced” Organizers • Very effective for new material critical input. • Help students organize their thoughts small, logical chunks. • Usable in all content areas.

  33. Effects of Different Learning Experiences Nuthall 1999

  34. New Learning Occurs Best When.. • Learners have a basic, personal connection with a new concept. • Have an opportunity to do their own thinking and attach learning to their own experiences. • The brain is stimulated to find possible previous patterns that relate to new learning. • Smilkstein; We’re Born to Learn 2003

  35. The Brain Looks for Patterns • Classification: A is an example of B • Causal: A causes B • Difference: A is unlike B • Similar: A is similar to B • Sequence: A occurs before B Sousa; How the Brain Learns 3rd Edition

  36. Common Advanced Organizers: • Story Maps • K-W-L Maps • Venn Diagrams

  37. Free Graphic Organizer Sites • http://freeology.com/graphicorgs • http://www.eduplace.com/graphicorganizer

  38. Reflection • Self assess on the reflective guide: • What do I typically do to preview new content? Page 9 • Discuss: • How will you preview content related to your learning goal?

  39. If the segment involves new knowledge what do you expect to see? • Previewing activities • Identify critical information • Info presented in small chunks • Students processing each chunk in small groups • Students summarizing and taking notes after content has been introduced • Students reflecting on their learning

  40. Identifying Critical Information • Explaining why content is important. • Signals students to which content is critical and which is non-critical • Teaching important vocabulary • Teacher cues students to important information

  41. Reflection • Self assess on the reflective guide: • What do I typically do to identify critical information? Page 7 • Discuss • How will you identify critical information related to your learning goal? • What important vocabulary will you need to teach?

  42. If the segment involves new knowledge what do you expect to see? • Previewing activities • Identify critical information • Info presented in small chunks • Students processing each chunk in small groups • Students summarizing and taking notes after content has been introduced • Students reflecting on their learning

  43. Some ideas for chunking… • King of Queens • ABCs

  44. Chunking helps us remember… • Pythagorean Theorem • a2+b2=c2 • Right triangles, hypotenuse, legs, square roots, exponents • Color wheel • Primary, secondary, and tertiary colors • Mixing techniques • Other ways we naturally chunk information to assist in remembering • 402-761-3341 • License plates • Social security numbers

  45. A Memory Task • I am going to quickly read a list of 10 things you might find in your desk. • After I have read the list you will write down as many of the items as you can.

  46. Paper clips • Stapler • Marker • Sticky notes • Notepad • Pencil • Ruler • Calculator • White out • Glue

  47. Primacy–RecencyEffect During a learning episode we remember best that which comes first, second best that which comes last, and least that which comes just past the middle. What does this look like in your classroom?