Good Tuesday Morning! Today is August 27, 2013. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Good Tuesday Morning! Today is August 27, 2013.

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  1. Good Tuesday Morning! Today is August 27, 2013. • issue- problem; copy of a magazine; to give • expose- to show • empire- having control of many similar and valuable things • glare- to stare • inhale- to breathe in Interesting Quote of the Day: “Success does not consist in never making blunders, but in never making the same one a second time.” --Josh Billings (American humorist) It’s International “Global Forgiveness Day.” Who needs forgiving? • Please sign in and find your seat quietly. • Copy your Vocabulary words into the Reading Keys section of your Stash book. • Copy ALL of your Homework and Test Schedule notes. • Take care of any morning needs. (Pencils, bathroom, water, check out a book, etc.) Do you have your morning books? Be sure you do because you will not be allowed to get up during class. Trivial Fact of the Day: No President of these United States was an only child from his parents.

  2. issue

  3. expose

  4. empire

  5. glare

  6. inhale

  7. Commas separate words in a series. You know this is true. Use a comma to separate three or more things in a series. I will need two cups of slime, six anchovies, three cups of pineapple juice, and a pinch of honey for my soup.

  8. Model: The soup was a masterwork, a delicate mingling of chicken, watercress, and garlic. The Tale of Despereaux Can you imagine your father selling you for a tablecloth, a hen, and a handful of cigarettes? The Tale of Despereaux YOUR TURN GUYS AND GALS!

  9. Let’s rev this up… What I wasn’t used to was having his smell back, the smoke from his Camel cigarettes, his Old Spice aftershave, and the shoe polish he used on his boots. All those father odors, filling up the house. My mother opened every window, waxed the wooden furniture, and sprayed room freshener in every corner. She scrubbed the tiles on the bathroom floor, scrubbed the dog’s water bowl, scrubbed her hair, her hands, and her face. My Father’s Summers Now…let’s model one of these!

  10. Yesterday you heard a pattern book. Today you will hear another kind of pattern book based on the alphabet. • You may decide that you would like to write an alphabet pattern yourself.

  11. What are some things that make this book interesting to read? • Think • Turn and talk with your partner

  12. This book is called Musical Instruments from A to Z. If you were going to write your own __________ from A to Z book, about what might it be? • Think. • Turn and talk to your partner.

  13. Open your writing journals, and turn to the ideas page. • Draw a line and label this section “_______ from A to Z” • Spend the next 3 to 5 minutes listing possible topics for this type of book.

  14. Share Time • Would anyone like to share some of their ideas for writing ______ from A to Z books?

  15. Independent Writing • Today you are going to write for about 25 minutes. • You have choices on what you are to write about. • Try writing a _____ from A to Z book. • Work on a piece you started earlier. • Start a new piece of writing. Remember that I will be calling some of you to the back for conferencing during this time. Bring your pencil and your writer’s notebook to the conference.

  16. Share Time • Would anyone like to share their writing from today. • Remember to show that we are caring community of writers while some are sharing.

  17. What does it really mean to summarize? • Rules to writing a really good summary • Include important ideas • Delete trivia and repeated ideas. • Collapse lists (HUH?) Paraphrase • Choose or create a topic sentence

  18. Why do we write summaries? Readers can write a summary of a text to let someone else know the main ideas

  19. Why do we write summaries? Summarizing a text helps you to understand it—as you figure out the most important ideas, your brain is engaged in understanding the text

  20. What makes a good summary? Here are four basic rules for writing a summary of nonfiction: • Include the important ideas from the text • Put ideas in your own words-paraphrase • Leave out little details and repeated information • Use the text structure of the text

  21. Include important ideas from the text This is easy to say, but sometimes hard to do! As you read, it’s important to think about what ideas are most important to the author

  22. Include important ideas from the text Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  23. Which ideas are important in this text? Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  24. Which ideas are important in this text? Even though you might have some personal connection with some of the ideas, you need to think about what’s important to the author. Look for the topic sentences and big ideas. Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  25. Which ideas are important in this text? Even though you might have some personal connection with some of the ideas, you need to think about what’s important to the author. Look for the topic sentences and big ideas. Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  26. Which ideas are important in this text? Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk. Do you agree that these are the big ideas in the text?

  27. Finding important ideas • What strategies do you use to find important ideas in a text? • Why do you think this is important for summarizing?

  28. What makes a good summary? • Include the important ideas from the text • Put ideas in your own words • Leave out little details and repeated information • Use the text structure of the text

  29. Putting ideas in your own words • Putting ideas in your own words is also called paraphrasing • Instead of just copying down the author’s words, we need to use our own words

  30. Paraphrasing There are some words that you can’t change when you paraphrase. These key words are the important words from the passage. For example, in the passage that we read, the words butterfly and caterpillar cannot be replaced

  31. What makes a good summary? • Include the important ideas from the text • Put ideas in your own words • Leave out little details and repeated information • Use the text structure of the text

  32. Trivial Details Small details can be called “trivial details”—they might be interesting, but are not important to the main ideas of the passage We do not need to include these small details in summaries

  33. What small details do you notice? Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  34. What small details do you notice? Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. While this example supports the main idea, it is not needed for a summary. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  35. What other small details do you notice? Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  36. What other small details do you notice? Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. The description of the Xerxes Society is not needed in a summary. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  37. Repeated Ideas Authors also might repeat ideas. When the same idea is restated, we only need to include it once in a summary.

  38. What makes a good summary? • Include the important ideas from the text • Put ideas in your own words • Leave out little details and repeated information • Use the text structure of the text

  39. Using text structure The text structure of a text refers to how the text is organized • Description • Cause and Effect • Chronological Order • Problem/Solution • Compare and Contrast

  40. Using text structure When you look at the text structure of a text, you can find the big ideas and see how to organize your summary • Description • Cause and Effect • Chronological Order • Problem/Solution • Compare and Contrast

  41. What is the text structure? Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  42. What is the text structure? Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. Overall, this paragraph shows the text structure of cause and effect. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  43. Text Structure in a Summary Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. In your summary, you need to show the cause and effect! If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  44. What makes a good summary? What do you remember about the four rules for writing a good summary? • Include the important ideas from the text • Put ideas in your own words • Leave out little details and repeated information • Use the text structure of the text

  45. Now, it’s your turn! Look back at the butterfly text. Can you write a summary?

  46. Write your own summary Many butterflies depend on certain plants to survive. As adults, butterflies drink nectar. But caterpillars eat leaves. Some caterpillars only eat the leaves of specific plants. Monarch caterpillars, for example, eat only milkweed. If butterflies cannot find the food source they need for their eggs, the next generation will not survive. When habitats are changed, such as when wetlands are drained or forests are cleared, butterfly populations may drop dramatically. According to the Xerxes Society, an invertebrate conservation group, over 50 kinds of U.S. butterflies are at risk.

  47. Chapter 7