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Ethics in the Helping Profession. Think, Pair and Share: What are some questions re: ethics you have?. General Considerations. Ethical obligations are different than legal obligations 5 Principles form the foundation of ethical standards: Autonomy Nonmaleficence Beneficence Justice

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ethics in the helping profession

Ethics in the Helping Profession

Think, Pair and Share:

What are some questions re: ethics you have?

general considerations
General Considerations
  • Ethical obligations are different than legal obligations
  • 5 Principles form the foundation of ethical standards:
    • Autonomy
    • Nonmaleficence
    • Beneficence
    • Justice
    • Fidelity
specific ethical standards
Specific ethical standards
  • Dual Relationships
  • What is it?
  • What is the problem: Power imbalance
  • Potential negative impact:
    • Biased treatment
    • Exploitation
    • Whose needs drive the helping process?
    • Group dynamics change
slide4
Physical contact-from the NASW code
    • Social workers should not engage in physical contact with clients when there is a possibility of psychological harm to the client as a result of the contact (such as cradling or caressing clients). Social workers who engage in appropriate physical contact with clients are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries that govern such physical contact.
slide5
3. Competence
  • Stay within your scope of training. Exceptions you may encounter:
    • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
    • Dealing with childhood sexual abuse
    • Family or couples counseling
    • Medication recommendations
  • Recognize cross-cultural limitations.
slide6
4. Confidentiality
  • Client’s right to privacy
  • Inform client of the right and the limitations
  • As an intern…
  • Exceptions to this right
7 exceptions to confidentiality
7 Exceptions to confidentiality
  • Release of information
  • Court subpoena
  • Duty to warn: imminent threat to a specific person
  • Danger to self
  • Danger to others/property due to mental illness
  • Suspicion of dependent adult abuse
  • Suspicion of child abuse

http://www.dshs.wa.gov/ca/safety/abuseWhat.asp?1 1-866-End-Harm

rcw defining abuse
RCW defining abuse
  • RCW 9A.16.100Use of force on children -- Policy -- Actions presumed unreasonable. It is the policy of this state to protect children from assault and abuse and to encourage parents, teachers, and their authorized agents to use methods of correction and restraint of children that are not dangerous to the children. However, the physical discipline of a child is not unlawful when it is reasonable and moderate and is inflicted by a parent, teacher, or guardian for purposes of restraining or correcting the child. Any use of force on a child by any other person is unlawful unless it is reasonable and moderate and is authorized in advance by the child's parent or guardian for purposes of restraining or correcting the child.     The following actions are presumed unreasonable when used to correct or restrain a child: (1) Throwing, kicking, burning, or cutting a child; (2) striking a child with a closed fist; (3) shaking a child under age three; (4) interfering with a child's breathing; (5) threatening a child with a deadly weapon; or (6) doing any other act that is likely to cause and which does cause bodily harm greater than transient pain or minor temporary marks. The age, size, and condition of the child and the location of the injury shall be considered when determining whether the bodily harm is reasonable or moderate. This list is illustrative of unreasonable actions and is not intended to be exclusive.
  • [1986 c 149 § 1.]
ethical decision making model
Ethical Decision Making Model
  • Identify the problem
  • Identify potential issues
  • Look for relevant ethical codes
  • Consider applicable laws and regulations, including agency policy.
  • Seek input from others.
  • Generate possible courses of action.
  • Identify the consequences of each possible action.
  • Make a decision, keeping the principles in mind.
  • Follow up on the outcome and evaluate.