What does it mean to Analyze Literature ? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

what does it mean to analyze literature n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
What does it mean to Analyze Literature ? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
What does it mean to Analyze Literature ?

play fullscreen
1 / 95
What does it mean to Analyze Literature ?
188 Views
Download Presentation
fadey
Download Presentation

What does it mean to Analyze Literature ?

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. What does it mean toAnalyze Literature? Your Guide to Successful critical thinking skills while reading a major piece of writing

  2. Analyzing Literature • What does it mean to analyze? • Definition: • Verb: to break down a topic into smaller parts and determine how the parts relate to each other. • Noun (analysis): an explanation of the separation of a whole into its smaller parts

  3. Literary Analysis • How does this apply to Literature? • Well . . . . • Consider what you are reading (short story, novel, etc . . .) as the ‘whole’ piece you will break up into smaller pieces.

  4. Literary Analysis • How does this apply to Literature? • THEN . . . • the smaller pieces are literary elements that make up the whole story.

  5. Literary Analysis • How does this apply to Literature? • All of this together will equal an analysis of a piece of literature! • AKA: a Literary Analysis!!! (which is a piece of writing in itself)

  6. Literary Analysis • How to perform the analysis: • Know how to identify theme while reading the story. • Pull citations from the story and write them down in a notebook every time an example of theme shows up (coming soon).

  7. What isTheme? Understanding the message the author is sending to the reader

  8. Theme • Definition: • the main idea, or message the writer shares in the writing

  9. Theme • Characteristics: • is usually an observation about life or human nature (how people behave) • is not directly stated in the writing, the reader needs to infer the theme. • is NOT the moral of the story

  10. Theme • Characteristics: • what the main character observes about life is usually the theme • is NOT the moral of the story

  11. Theme • What readers do with theme: • many literary analysis’ are written to prove the theme of a piece of writing. • This is what you will be doing throughout the unit: learning how to analyze literature to prove its theme.

  12. Theme • Universal Theme: • a theme that applies to anyone regardless of race, gender, age, religion, time frame, etc . . .

  13. Theme Let’s brainstorm some examples!

  14. Theme • Something to remember: • Theme is NOT what the story is about! • Let’s look at how to tell the difference . . .

  15. Theme • A story is written about Anna, who is scared to start at a new school, but soon makes many friends. • What is this story about? • Anna being scared to start at a new school. • What could be a theme, or message from this story? • don’t fear the unknown, making friends is easier than it seems, etc . . .

  16. Theme • A story is written about Jerry who is peer pressured to tag on the school and gets caught. • What is this story about? • Jerry getting caught tagging. • What could be a theme, or message from this story? • Be strong enough to do the right thing, friends who ask you to do something wrong aren’t your friends, etc . . .

  17. Theme • A story is written about a Mike who thinks his neighbor is creepy, but gets to know him and finds out he’s really cool. • What is this story about? • Mike getting to know his neighbor. • What could be a theme, or message from this story? • Don’t judge a book by its cover

  18. What is a Literary Analysis?

  19. Literary Analysis • What is it? • A close look at a literary work, then a breakdown of that work. • Most times, the breakdown is of the theme of the work. • This is what you will be doing when writing your literary analysis.

  20. Literary Analysis • A Literary Analysis consists of: • An introduction • At LEAST 3 examples • A conclusion

  21. Literary Analysis • Basically . . . • You will make a statement about the theme of a piece of literature . . . AND • Use quotations and examples from the literature to support and explain your statement

  22. Literary Analysis • How does it work? • The author of an analysis starts with a thesis statement. • A thesis statementis a single sentence in the introduction of a literary analysis that makes a statement about the work. • In your case, you will be stating the theme of the work.

  23. Literary Analysis • How do I write a Thesis Statement? • First, you have to understand the theme you have chosen to write your Literary Analysis about. • I have chosen to write about inhumanity, which is people not treating other people as humans.

  24. Literary Analysis • How do I write a Thesis Statement? • Then, you decide how the theme connects with the protagonist. • The protagonist, Elie, both experienced and witnessed inhumanity while at the concentration camps.

  25. Literary Analysis • How do I write a Thesis Statement? • Finally, decide what statement you can make about the two? • Elie realized that when people are put in life or death situations, they can treat other people cruelly. People will do this because they know it will help them survive.

  26. Literary Analysis • Introductory Paragraph • Once the thesis statement is written, the rest of the introduction to the literary analysis can be written. • How does that happen? What needs to be included in an introduction? Let’s find out . . .

  27. Literary Analysis • I.P. – What should be included: • Who and What the analysis is discussing • Who = the name of the author • What= the title of the book People reading your analysis have to know who and what you are discussing ! ! !

  28. Literary Analysis • I.P. – What should be included: • Background information on the novel • This is considered a short summary of the novel • Should contain something interesting about the novel (this is considered a hook)

  29. Literary Analysis • I.P. – What should be included: • When all of this information is gathered and written down, it is put together to form the introductory paragraph! ! !

  30. Literary Analysis Now that you have written the introduction for your analysis, it is time to support that thesis statement! How do you do that? Let’s find out . . .

  31. Literary Analysis • Your thesis statement makes a statement about the novel Night. • Your next step is to prove and support statement.

  32. Literary Analysis • This is where your citations come in. • The citations are proof from the novel that your chosen theme exists. • In your example paragraphs, you will Introduce these Citations and Explain why they are important to the theme.

  33. Literary Analysis • Your 3 example paragraphs will go in this order: • Beginning of story • Middle of story • End of story

  34. Literary Analysis • Step One: • Introduce: • This step discusses where in the novel the citation occurs and what is going on in the novel for it to have happened. • Remember: you are writing this analysis for someone who has never read the book, so you MUST be clear as to what is going on in the book.

  35. Literary Analysis • Step One: • Introduce: • Example: • In the beginning of the novel, Elie explains how strong his faith is in his religion . He shows this when he has a discussion about praying with Moishe the Beadle.

  36. Literary Analysis • Step Two: • Citation: • This step provides proof from the novel. • This will occur as an effective direct quotation from the novel. • Once the quotation is put in the analysis, it must be cited (shown where it came from). Directly after the quote, you will write the page number of where the quote came from.

  37. Literary Analysis • Step Two: • Citation: • Example: • Moishe asked Elie why he prayed, and Elie found this to be very strange. All he could think of was, “Why did I live? Why did I breathe?” (4).

  38. Literary Analysis • Step Three: • Explanation: • This step discusses why the quotation is proof of the theme. • The reader of your analysis needs to know why you chose the quote that you chose, which is why you explain it.

  39. Literary Analysis • Step Three: • Explanation: • Example: • The fact that Elie compares praying to living and breathing shows his devotion to his faith. He sees his faith as an important piece of his life. He also finds it strange that someone of the same faith as him would ask such a question.

  40. Literary Analysis • Concluding: • As always, paragraphs need to be wrapped up. • Example: • Elie shows the readers of Nightthat it is evident he has a very strong faith in his Jewish religion.

  41. 1. 2. 6. 3. 4. 5. 7. 8. 9. 10. Introduction: In the beginning of the novel, Elie explains how strong his faith is in his religion. He shows this when he has a discussion about praying with Moishe the Beadle. Citation 1: Citation 2: Moishe asked Elie why he prayed, and Elie found this to be very strange. All he could think of was, “Why did I live? Why did I breathe?” (4). Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: The fact that Elie compares praying to living and breathing shows his devotion to his faith. He also finds it strange that someone of the same faith as him would ask such a question. He sees his faith as an important piece of his life. Conclusion: Elie shows the readers of Night that it is evident he has a strong faith in his Jewish religion.

  42. 1. 2. 6. 3. 4. 5. 7. 8. 9. 10. Introduction: Citation 1: Citation 2: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: Conclusion:

  43. 1. Introduction: Introduction 2. Citation #1: Citation #2: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation: Explanation:

  44. 1. Introduction: 2. Citation #1: Explanation: Explanation:

  45. Literary Analysis Conclusion Paragraph How to wrap up a literary analysis.

  46. Literary Analysis • Conclusion Paragraph: • Wraps up the whole literary analysis. • Is a last chance for you to comment on the theme and character you are writing about.

  47. Literary Analysis • Conclusion Paragraph: • Should include: • The thesis statement (restated) • Important information from the novel that helps explain how the thesis statement was proven.

  48. Literary Analysis • Conclusion Paragraph: • Let’s look at some examples for the book Green Eggs and Ham. • Important Info: • Unnamed character won’t try green eggs and ham • He finally does • Thesis Statement: • Trying new things can be good and create new experiences.

  49. Literary Analysis • Conclusion Paragraph: • Here are some ideas to use: • By applying your theme, explain how the protagonist has changed from the beginning of the story to the end.

  50. Literary Analysis • Conclusion Paragraph: • Bad Example: • The character in Green Eggs and Ham changed because he got annoyed at Sam I am and tried the food.