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The Liturgy of the Word

The Liturgy of the Word

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The Liturgy of the Word

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  1. The Liturgy of the Word There are virtually no changes to the English texts we use for the Liturgy of the Word, except for the Creed.

  2. However, there are minor changes to the words that the priest, and deacon if there is one, say in a quiet voice preceding and concluding the proclamation of the Gospel. In the new text the priest asks that the deacon proclaim it “worthily and well” and if the priest proclaims the Gospel, he refers to the “holy Gospel”, not just the “Gospel.”

  3. The text after the Gospel, which the priest says in a low voice, is changing very slightly to this: “Through the words of the Gospel may our sins be wiped away.” (This new translation will not affect the Scripture readings. The Scripture readings are in separate volumes entitled the Lectionary for Mass and the Book of the Gospels. A new translation for these is also under way…..)

  4. The Profession of Faith: CREED The words we say to profess our faith in the Creed are changing. You will probably notice more changes in this text than in any other words you say at Mass.

  5. The new translation aims to reflect the Latin more faithfully and to express our common faith with more precision. Take a look at the chart which compares the current and new translations for the Nicene Creed. The bold print shows the differences at a glance.

  6. The Current Translation: We believe in one God the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all that is seen and unseen. We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ the only Son of God, eternally begotten of the Father God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made, one in Being with the Father.

  7. Through him all things were made. For us men and for our salvation he came down from heaven: by the power of the Holy Spirit he was born of the Virgin Mary, and became man. For our sake, he was crucified under Pontius Pilate; he suffered death and was buried. On the third day he rose again in accordance with the Scriptures; he ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

  8. He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead, and his kingdom will have no end. We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life, who proceeds from the Father and the Son. With the Father and the Son he is worshipped and glorified. He has spoken through the Prophets.

  9. We believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church. We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins. We look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come. Amen.

  10. New Translation: I believe in one God, the Father almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all things visible and invisible.

  11. And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the Only Begotten Son of God, born of the Father before all ages. God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made, consubstantial with the Father; through him all things were made. For us men and for our salvation he came down from heaven, and by the Holy Spirit was incarnate of the Virgin Mary, and became man.

  12. For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate, he suffered death and was buried, and rose again on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures. He ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father. He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead and his kingdom will have no end.

  13. And in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life, who proceeds from the Father and the Son, who with the Father and the Son is adored and glorified, who has spoken through the Prophets. And one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church. I confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sins and I look forward to the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come. Amen.

  14. EXPLANATIONS: You will notice that the Creed begins with “I” instead of “We.” The Creed is still the faith of the entire Church, but each of us proclaims it to assert our personal faith together with other believers. “I believe” is a literal translation of the Latin word “Credo”. You will also notice that the words “I believe” occur only once at the very beginning.

  15. In our current translation we say the words “We believe” four times. In Latin the word “Credo” appears only once at the beginning, and it supplies the main verb for all the phrases that follow. In the revised translation, the Creed begins with “I believe” – translation of Credo (singular); and said only once. and the word “And” unites the various parts of the Creed that follow.

  16. “Of all things visible and invisible”(“visibilium… et invisibilium”) The choice of these words over “seen and unseen” makes the meaning more precise. Some things that are visible by nature are actually unseen at certain times and places. Your relatives who live across the country are visible, but unseen to you. We believe that God is the maker not only of things we cannot see for whatever reason, but also of things that are in fact invisible – for example, the saints and angels who occupy a place in our belief and worship.

  17. “Only Begotten”(“Unigenitum”) These words translate the Latin more fully. They reaffirm our faith that Jesus not merely materialized as the Son of God, but that he was intentionally begotten; his presence has always been part of the divine plan. It replaces the current: “Only Son”

  18. “Born of the Father before all ages”(“Ex Patrenatum ante ominasaecula”) This replaces the words “eternally begotten of the Father,” and makes the meaning more precise. Jesus dwelled with the Father before time began.

  19. “Consubstantial”(“Consubstantialem” In the entire revised translation of Mass, this is probably the word that is most challenging. It replaces the expression “one in Being,” and it describes the relationship between Jesus and the Father. The question of how Jesus relates to the Father has immense importance.

  20. Heresies have divided Christians over this very issue. The early Church Councils forged a vocabulary that carefully articulates orthodox faith, and they chose this word to express the dogma of Jesus’ divinity. The Latin word means “having the same substance,” which is even more fundamental than “one in Being.”

  21. “Incarnate”(“Incarnatusest”) This word replaces the word “born” in the current translation. It means something like “given flesh.” It professes our belief that the Word became flesh in the womb of the Virgin Mary. Our current translation could be misunderstood to state that the Word became flesh when Jesus was born.

  22. “Suffered death”(“Passus”) This replaces two verbs in the current translation, “suffered, died.” The Latin is ambiguous. Literally, it says, “he suffered and was buried,” and the word “suffered” implies his dying. Because the verb “died” is not there in Latin, “suffered death” seems a better way to express what happened to Jesus. The point is that he really died, and that is what gives his Resurrection its full meaning.

  23. “Adored”(“Adoratur”) The new translation chooses this word to replace “worshipped”. It more closely reflects the Latin word.

  24. “I confess”(“Confiteor”) This replaces “We acknowledge,” and is a more forceful expression. In this context, “confess” means “profess belief in” – not “express sorrow for sins.” It is stronger than “acknowledge” because it involves the heart, not just the head. “Confiteor” is singular = “I confess”.

  25. “I look forward to the resurrection”(“”Exspectoresurrectionem”) At the end of the Creed, instead of saying merely that we “look for the resurrection,” we say we “look forward to” it. This is a clearer translation of the Latin, but it resounds with confidence. With confidence we state belief in God who gives us faith.

  26. In the Apostles’ Creed: “He descended into hell” This is the more literal translation of the Latin “ad inferos”. (It is not “ad mortuos”) (It replaces: “He descended to the dead”.) “Hell” = was identified in the past as place where Adam and all ancestors waited for the death of Christ to open Heaven = “limbo; but some authors say it can mean place of the “lost sheep” (the real “hell”).

  27. The Liturgy of the Eucharist Preparation of the Gifts: The Liturgy of the Eucharist begins with the Preparation of the Gifts. This part of Mass is brief, and there are only a very few alterations to the words used. The words of the priest, though, differ slightly to emphasise that we are in the act of offering the bread and wine. “Bread to offer” becomes “the bread we offer you”and similarly with the “wine we offer you”.

  28. After he washes his hands, the priest invites you to pray. His invitation is slightly different: “Pray, brethren (brothers and sisters), / that my sacrifice and yours / may be acceptable to God, / the almighty Father.”

  29. You will notice here the expansion from the words “our sacrifice” to “my sacrifice and yours.” In keeping with the Latin text, this implies that more than one sacrifice is being offered. On the one hand, the Mass is a single sacrifice offered by all present. On the other hand, each baptised member of the assembly is offering a sacrifice, in keeping with his or her priestly role.

  30. Your response to this plea changes by the addition of one single word: “holy” “May the Lord accept the sacrifice at your hands / for the praise and glory of his name, / for our good / and the good of all his holy Church.” The word holy (“sanctae”) appears in Latin, so it is being added to the English. The revision fills out the sense of dialogue and echoes the description of the Church in the Creed.

  31. TO BE CONTINUED……. PADAYONON……..