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Mrs. Ramsey Vilonia HS. Introduction. More accidents occur in the kitchen than any other room of the home. Most accidents can be prevented with some thought, pre-planning and attention to detail. We will be covering: How to prevent injuries in the kitchen. How to prevent food-borne illness.

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slide1

Mrs. Ramsey

Vilonia HS

introduction
Introduction
  • More accidents occur in the kitchen than any other room of the home. Most accidents can be prevented with some thought, pre-planning and attention to detail. We will be covering:
    • How to prevent injuries in the kitchen.
    • How to prevent food-borne illness.
preventing injuries
Preventing Injuries
  • Common injuries in the kitchen:
    • Cuts
    • Burns & Fires
    • Electric Shock
    • Falls
    • Poisoning/Chemical Hazards
preventing cuts
Preventing Cuts
  • Using knives safely:
    • A sharp knife is safer than a dull knife.
    • Use an acrylic cutting board, and cut food away from your body.
    • If the knife falls, jump back and let it drop.
    • Never use a knife to open cans or pry lids.
    • Wash and store knives and other sharp objects separately from other utensils.
preventing cuts1
Preventing Cuts
  • Removing broken glass safely:
    • Sweep broken glass into a dustpan immediately.
    • Wipe the area with several layers of damp paper towel to remove glass chips.
    • Place broken glass and damp paper towels in a paper bag and place the bag in a trash container.
first aid in the case of a cut
FIRST AID IN THE CASE OF A CUT
  • Cover wound with clean cloth and apply pressure. If minor clean with soap and water.
preventing burns
Preventing Burns
  • Using cookware safely:
    • Turn the handles of cookware inward on a range.
    • Use thick, dry potholders when handling hot pans.
    • Open lids, like a shield, away from your body to avoid steam burns.
    • Pull out the oven rack first when removing hot cookware from the oven.
    • Remember that the heating elements on electric ranges remain hot for a long time after being turned off.
preventing burns1
Preventing Burns
  • Using a microwave oven safely:
    • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions, especially for cooking and heating times to avoid burns from overheated foods.
      • Do not use excessive amounts of time to heat water or liquids to avoid “super heating” (past boiling temperature) which can cause liquids to “explode” under certain conditions.
    • Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for appropriate cookware.
      • Use potholders to remove hot cookware. Heated food and steam can make even “microwave safe” cookware hot.
      • Never place metal or aluminum products in the microwave!
    • Open lids or remove plastic wrap away from you to avoid steam burns.
    • Microwaves should not be operated when they are empty.
  • The FDA has regulated microwave oven manufacturing since 1971. As long as the microwave oven meets FDA standards and is used as directed it is said to be safe.
first aid for burns
FIRST AID FOR BURNS
  • Immediately run cold water over a burn.
preventing electric shock
Preventing Electric Shock
  • Unplug any electrical appliance, like a toaster, before removing food or objects that have become stuck in the appliance.
  • Unplug electrical appliances from the outlet by grasping the plug, not the cord.
  • Keep cords away from heat sources or from hanging over the edge of the counter.
  • Dry hands completely before operating electrical appliances.
preventing electric shock1
Preventing Electric Shock
  • Keep electrical appliances away from water.
  • Don’t use lightweight extension cords with small appliances.
  • Don’t overload electrical outlets.
  • Don’t use damaged appliances.
first aid in the case of electric shock
First Aid in the Case of Electric Shock
  • Do not touch the person if they are connected to the

power source.

  • Disconnect the appliance or turn off the power causing

the shock.

  • Use a non-conducting material (rope, dry cloth,

wooden pole) to pull the person away from the

electrical source.

  • Call for help.
preventing falls
Preventing Falls
  • Avoiding falls, bumps & bruises:
    • Clean up spills immediately with paper towels.
    • Keep cupboard doors and drawers closed or shut when they are not in use.
    • Use a ladder/stool to retrieve high or hard-to-reach objects.
    • Use non-skid rugs.
    • Keep floor clear of clutter
first aid in the case of a fall
FIRST AID IN THE CASE OF A FALL
  • If you suspect a broken bone do not move the person.
  • Make person comfortable.
  • Do not give them anything to eat or drink.
preventing fires
Preventing Fires
  • Avoiding fires in the kitchen:
    • Store oils away from the stove.
    • Wear short or close-fitting sleeves while cooking.
    • Tie back long hair when cooking.
    • Keep towels, potholders, paper towels, and other flammable materials away from the stove and oven.
    • Clean up grease build-up from the stove, oven and the exhaust fan regularly.
    • Avoid leaving the kitchen while cooking.
    • Have a smoke detector near the kitchen.
preventing fires1
Preventing Fires
  • Putting out small fires in the kitchen:
    • Small Pan Fires
      • Use a larger lid to smother the flame.
    • Grease Fires
      • Use baking soda to put out the fire — water or flour will only make the flames larger.
    • Clothing Fires
      • If your clothes catch on fire - Stop, Drop & Roll!
    • Fire Extinguishers
      • Always have fire extinguishers or baking soda readily available in the kitchen in case of fires.
putting out fires
Putting out Fires

Don’t forget to use your ARMS!!!

Aim

Release pin

Measure distance of 10 ft

Squeeze and spray

PASS the Fire Extinguisher

  • Pull
  • Aim
  • Squeeze
  • Spray
preventing poisoning
Preventing Poisoning
  • Using household chemicals safely:
    • Keep drain cleaners, household cleaners, and other products which contain poisons in their original containers.
    • Read all product labels and only use as intended.
    • Store dangerous products out of the reach of children and pets, and away from food items.
    • Don’t mix cleaning products together. Mixing some chemicals may cause a hazardous reaction.
    • Follow the manufacturers directions when handling insect control chemicals.
chemical hazards

Labels

CAUTION

Corrosive

Avoid Contact

Chemical Hazards
  • Pay attention to the labels:
    • Hazard
      • Potentially dangerous.
    • Flammable
      • Anything that ignites easily or is capable of burning rapidly.
    • Use and Care Instructions
      • Instructions written by manufacturers to inform consumers how to use and care for the product.
    • Caustic Cleaner
      • Household cleaner that may burn or corrode the skin on contact.
    • Poisonous
      • Capable of harming or killing if ingested.
preventing injury to children
Preventing Injury to Children
  • Childproofing your kitchen:
    • If you have children under the age of 2 in the house, use a safety gate to the kitchen.
    • Remove small magnets from the refrigerator to prevent choking accidents.
    • Put a cover over the garbage disposal switch.
    • Move household chemicals out of children’s reach and/or put safety latches on all cupboards.
    • Store knives out of the reach of children.
    • Teach children about kitchen safety!
safety phone numbers
Safety Phone Numbers
  • Every kitchen should have a list of important phone numbers in case of an emergency.
  • Safety phone numbers include:
    • Fire Department
    • Ambulance/Emergency Medical Care
    • Family Doctor
    • Poison Control Center

1-800-222-1222

preventing choking
Preventing Choking
  • Chew food thoroughly before swallowing.
  • Avoid talking or laughing with food in your mouth.
  • If choking occurs:
    • Do the Heimlich maneuver (procedure that removes food or other obstacles form a choking person’s airway) if necessary.
    • Someone who can cough, breathe, or talk is not choking.
    • If the person looses consciousness, do not attempt the Heimlich.
    • Call for help.

6.4, 6.5

food borne illness
Food-borne Illness
  • A food-borne illness is a disease transmitted by food, the source of which is bacteria, or toxins produced by bacteria.
  • Symptoms are flu-like including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and other reactions, lasting a few hours to several days.
food borne illness1
Food-borne Illness
  • Some bacteria is safe and commonly eaten, such as yeast in bread, bacteria in yogurt, and mold in blue cheese.
  • By proper handling of food, illness can be prevented.
risky foods for food borne illness
Risky Foods for Food-borne Illness
  • Risky foods are foods that are most likely to cause food-borne illness. Risky foods include:
    • Raw meat, poultry, eggs, milk (unpasteurized) and shellfish.
    • Raw fruits & vegetables which have been processed in unsanitary conditions (especially sprouts and unpasteurized fruit juices).
    • Cooked plant products like pasta, rice and vegetables.
    • Unpasteurized dairy products (soft cheeses).
  • Extra care must be taken to avoid food-borne illness when handling these foods.
food borne illnesses
FOOD-BORNE ILLNESSES

BOTULISM

FOOD SOURCE: IMPROPERLY PROCESSED HOME-CANNED LOW-ACID FOODS, PROCESSED MEATS

SYMPTOMS: DOUBLE VISION, INABILITY TO SWALLOW, RESPIRATORY PARALYSIS THAT CAN LEAD TO DEATH

APPEAR: 4 TO 36 HOURS AFTER EATING

food borne illnesses1
FOOD-BORNE ILLNESSES

E. COLI

FOOD SOURCE- UNDERCOOKED GROUND MEAT, UNPASTEURIZED MILK, CONTAMINATED WATER, VEGETABLES GROWN IN COW MANURE

SYMPTOMS- BLOODY STOOLS, STOMACHACHE, NAUSEA

APPEARS- 12 TO 72 HOURS AFTER EATING

LAST- 4 TO 10 DAYS

food borne illnesses2
FOOD-BORNE ILLNESSES

SALMONELLOSIS

FOOD SOURCES- RAW POULTRY, MEAT, EGGS AND DAIRY PRODUCTS

SYMPTOMS- SEVERE HEADACHE, NAUSEA, ABDOMINAL PAIN, DIARRHEA, FEVER

APPEAR- 8 TO 12 HOURS AFTER EATING

LAST- 2 TO 3 DAYS

food borne illness2
FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS

STAPHYLOCOCCAL

FOOD SOURCES- MEATS, POULTRY, CREAM PIES, EGG, CHICKEN, POTATO AND MACARONI SALADS

SYMPTOMS- ABDOMINAL CRAMPING, NAUSEA, DIARRHEA

APPEAR- 30 MINUTES TO 8 HOURS AFTER EATING

LAST- 1 TO 2 DAYS

6.3

food borne illness3
FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS

TRICHINOSIS- A FOOD PARASITE THAT CAUSES A DISEASE FOUND IN RAW OR UNDERCOOKED PORK

* RARE IN THE UNITED STATES

SYMPTOMS: MUSCULAR ACHE, FEVER

PREVENTION- COOK PORK TO AN INTERNAL TEMPATURE OF 160°F

6.3

food borne illnesses3
Food Borne Illnesses
  • Listeriosis
    • Infection rare
    • Most frequently affects pregnant women in their last trimester, newborns, and children and adults whose immunity is weakened by diseases such as cancer or AIDS
    • Can be transmitted through soil and water. 
    • Also caused by ingesting certain foods, such as deli meats and cold cuts, soft-ripened cheese, milk, undercooked chicken, uncooked hot dogs, shellfish, and coleslaw made from contaminated cabbage.

6.3

food borne illnesses4
Food Borne Illnesses
  • Perfringens Poisoning
    • Clostridium perfringens is one of the most commonly

reported foodborne illnesses

    • Sometimes it is called the "food service germ"
    • Food served in quantity and left for long periods on a steam table or at room temperature can cause this illness.
    • Intense abdominal pain and diarrhea begin 8 to 22 hours

after eating foods that contain these bacteria.

    • Usually over within 24 hours but less severe symptoms

may last longer for some people – especially very young

or older people.

    • Often confused with the "24-Hour Flu."
preventing food borne illness
Preventing Food-borne Illness
  • To fight bacteria that may cause food-borne illness, follow these steps to food safety:
    • Cookfoods thoroughly to destroys harmful bacteria that may be present in food.
    • Separatefoods to avoid cross-contamination!
    • Chill- follow the COOL rules!
    • Cleanhands, surfaces and produce.
preventing food borne illness1
Preventing Food-borne Illness
  • CLEAN hands, surfaces and produce!
    • Hands:

Wash hands with hot, soapy water.

Scrub hands, wrist and fingernails for at least 20 seconds.

Rinse with hot water.

Dry with a paper towel.

Wash hands before and after handling food; and after using the bathroom, handling pets, or changing diapers.

preventing food borne illness2
Preventing Food-borne Illness
  • CLEAN hands, surfaces and produce!
    • Surfaces:
      • Use paper towels to clean kitchen surfaces (throw germs away).
      • Wash cutting boards, counters and utensils with hot, soapy water.
      • Wipe up spills in the refrigerator, microwave and stove immediately.
    • Produce:
      • Wash raw produce under running water. Use a small vegetable brush to remove surface dirt.
      • Cut away any damaged or bruised areas.
clean
Clean

Keep hair tied back and avoid touching it.

  • Cover an open sore or cut with rubber gloves.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes and wash hands immediately.
  • Wash hands thoroughly after handling raw meat.
  • Use paper towels to clean raw meat juices, throw paper away and clean area.
  • Wash dish cloths and sponges daily.
preventing food borne illness3
Preventing Food-borne Illness

COOK FOOD TO THE PROPER

INTERNAL TEMPERATURE

6.2

preventing food borne illness4
Preventing Food-borne Illness
  • COOKfoods thoroughly to destroys harmful bacteria that may be present in food:
    • Foods are properly cooked when heated for a long enough time at a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria.
      • Ground Beef - Cook to an internal temperature of 160° F; should no longer be pink.
      • Meat & Poultry - Cook until juices run clear. Roasts & steaks to at least 145° F. and Poultry 170°F (pieces) to 180° F (whole).
      • Eggs - Cook until the yolk and whites are firm.
      • Seafood - Cook until opaque and flakes easily with a fork.
      • Leftovers - Reheat quickly at a high temperature. Internal temperature should be at least 165° F. Bring sauces, soups and gravies to a boil.
slide51
Cook

Keep hot foots hot (above 140 degrees F)

Do not partially cook foods and then set aside or

refrigerate to complete the cooking later.

Dispose of bulging, leaking or damaged cans.

Use only clean, fresh, unbroken eggs.

Do not eat raw cookie dough or taste partially

cooked dishes containing meat, poultry, fish or eggs.

Preventing Food-borne Illness

preventing food borne illness5
Preventing Food-borne Illness
  • SEPARATEfoods to avoid cross-contamination!
    • Safely separate raw meat and seafood from other foods in your shopping cart and your refrigerator.
    • Wash hands, cutting boards, dishes and utensils after they come in contact with raw meat, poultry, eggs and unwashed produce.
    • Place cooked food on a clean plate.
    • In the refrigerator, place raw foods in a sealed container to prevent meat juices from dripping on other food.
    • Wipe up meat juice from all surfaces promptly.
slide53
Separate

Don’t taste and cook with the same spoon.

Have a separate towel for wiping hands and dishes.

In the refrigerator, place raw foods in a sealed container to prevent meat juices from dripping on other food.

Wipe up meat juice from all surfaces promptly.

Preventing Food-borne Illness

preventing food borne illness6
Preventing Food-borne Illness
  • Follow these COOL rules:
    • Keep foods out of the Danger Zone (40° F. - 140° F.)
    • Thaw foods in the refrigerator or microwave.
    • A refrigerator can be too full. Cold air must circulate to keep food safe.
  • CHILL leftovers:
    • Remember the 2-hour rule - refrigerate foods within 2 hours.
    • Divide large amounts of leftovers into smaller, low containers for quick cooling.
    • Use a cooler or ice pack to keep perishable food cold, especially on hot summer days.
    • When in doubt, throw it out!
serving food
SERVING FOOD

KEEP EXTRA FOOD EITHER “HOT” IN ANOTHER COOKING APPLIANCE OR “COLD” IN THE REFRIGERATOR

DO NOT ADD MORE FOOD TO A SERVING DISH THAT HAS BEEN OUT FOR A WHILE

food storage
FOOD STORAGE
  • REFRIGERATE FOOD IN SHALLOW CONTAINERS
  • NEVER TASTE FOOD THAT SMELLS OR LOOKS QUESTIONABLE

6.2

storing food
STORING FOOD

Quick Tips for Storing Food

  • Your refrigerator should be set at 40 °F or colder. Your freezer should be set at 0 °F or colder.
  • Freeze any fresh fish, meat, or poultry that you cannot use within a few days.

6.2

storing food1
STORING FOOD

If refrigerating meats, place on a plate or pan so that their juices will not drip onto other food. These juices can contain bacteria.

Make sure to use or freeze cooked meat that has been stored in the refrigerator within 3-4 days.

6.2

food storage1
FOOD STORAGE
  • Store raw meats no longer than 3-4 months in the freezer.
  • Store cooked meats no longer than 2-3 months in the freezer.
  • Make sure to place all raw meats and eggs on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.
technology keeping your food safe
Technology: Keeping your food safe!

Irradiation

http://www.fda.gov/opacom/catalog/irradbro.html

Pasteurization

Homogenization

you re the expert
You’re the Expert
  • You are invited to a party at a friend’s house. Your friend has been preparing snacks, but you become concerned with some of his food preparation.
  • In small groups discuss why the following are hazardous:
    • He makes a meat dish and potato salad, and leaves them sitting on the counter for over 2 hours.
    • He grills hamburgers that are still pink on the inside.
    • He uses the same knife and cutting board to slice chicken and to chop lettuce.
kitchen safety quiz
Kitchen Safety Quiz

Answer to the following questions:

1. What is one way you could get cut in the kitchen?

2. What is one way you could get burned in the kitchen? How can you avoid getting burned in that way?

3. What should always be readily available in the kitchen in case of an emergency?

4. Always _____ and _____ knives separately.

5. What are the symptoms of food-borne illness?

applying what you know
Applying What You Know
  • Create a kitchen safety poster for your kitchen at home. Identify the major causes of accidents in the kitchen and include emergency phone numbers.
  • Interview a local firefighter about his or her experience with kitchen accidents. Ask for additional tips and words of advice on preventing kitchen fires and other accidents. Write about your findings.
  • Make a safety flyer outlining the ways to make the kitchen childproof.
exploring the web
Exploring the Web
  • Here are some suggested sites you and your class may want to investigate for more information on safety in the kitchen.
    • http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/nasd/menus/tophome.html
      • NASD Home Safety.
    • http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/fdkitchn.html
      • FDA Can your kitchen pass a safety test?
    • http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/nasd/docs3/me97019.html
      • NASD Kitchen Safety.
    • http://www.foodsafety.gov/~fsg/kitchen.html
      • Food safety tips.
    • http://www.fightbac.org
      • Food Safety.
  • Teachers: Please note that these addresses are constantly changing and being updated. You may need to revise this list.