Process Implementation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

enan
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Process Implementation PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Process Implementation

play fullscreen
1 / 10
Download Presentation
123 Views
Download Presentation

Process Implementation

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Process Implementation TWELVE

  2. Foote proposes process of • Recognise employees have knowledge to share • Use knowledge to enhance marketing operations • Use knowledge to create new value propositions • Armbrecht suggest “six imperatives” of • Instill knowledge value across workforce • Seek to enhance tacit knowledge access • Develop search and retrieval systems • Promote creative thinking • Capture explicit learning • Create supportive culture TWELVE

  3. Knowledge is often fragmented and difficult to share • Need to convert tacit into explicit knowledge • Explicit knowledge must then: • Be stored • Refined and classified • Employee roles defined • IT support systems established • IT has critical role in knowledge form conversion and exploitation TWELVE

  4. Some knowledge (e.g. arm policies) is highly stable • Other knowledge (e.g. customer data) is continually undergoing change • Change requires effective database integration systems to support employee interaction • Culture heavily impacts acceptance and usage of knowledge by employees TWELVE

  5. Can also have problem of varying sub-cultures across different departments • Prevailing culture of “knowledge is power” is barrier to knowledge sharing • Critical dependence upon trust to ensure effective knowledge sharing • Have to manage both horizontal and vertical knowledge exchange TWELVE


  6. Effective exploiters of external knowledge know: • Supports innovation • Permits questioning of fundamental beliefs • Permits emergence of more effective strategies • One source of external knowledge is to form alliances with other organisations • Emphasis on alliances as firms seek to become global operations TWELVE

  7. Early alliance theory based on exploiting each other’s cost advantages • Increasing acceptance that alliances are about acquiring new knowledge • Firms like to create legal agreements to protect knowledge rights • Outcomes depend on whether both seek mutual benefit or one or other hopes to win knowledge acquisition race TWELVE

  8. Through alliances inter-firm learning occurs • If both committed to alliance get learning symmetry • Asymmetrical learning where one more committed to learning than other • Risk of asymmetrical learning is one party learns and departs alliance to become new source of competition TWELVE

  9. Symmetrical learning parties often have different learning objectives • Learning process is easier if partners are not in direct competition in any markets • Knowledge transfer requires transparency and receptivity • Societal cultures can be different and can be an obstacle in trust creation TWELVE

  10. Employee behaviour such as belief in self versus belief in team can be a barrier • Attitudes towards speed of action and decision-making can be a barrier • Participatory versus autocratic management styles can be a barrier TWELVE