engineering structures 101 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Engineering Structures 101 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Engineering Structures 101

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 38
Download Presentation

Engineering Structures 101 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

emmanuel-hale
117 Views
Download Presentation

Engineering Structures 101

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Engineering Structures 101 Structural Engineering: From the Beginning Professor Martin FaheyHead, School of Civil & Resource EngineeringRoom A1.10(e-mail: fahey@civil.uwa.edu.au)

  2. Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris. 1150 -1220. Example of Gothic Architecture

  3. Notre Dame de Paris. 1150 -1220.

  4. Notre Dame de Paris

  5. Notre Dame de Paris: North Rose Window. Suspended in perfect equilibrium on a web of stone, the immense north rose window remains intact after 700 years, its intricately interlocking blocks so exact they ring when struck. Though individual blocks may be removed for repairs without collapsing the whole, only minor buckling has occurred 17 m 13 m

  6. Notre Dame de Paris. Schematic sections showing the “flying butresses”

  7. Decorative features on tops of columns (statues, pinnacles, as in Notre Dame, below) have stabilising function

  8. Construction of a Gothic cathedral

  9. Bourges Cathedral, France, 1214. Most efficient flying buttress system ever constructed.

  10. Sections through various French Gothic Cathedrals, showing progressive development

  11. Amiens Cathedral, France, 1220.

  12. Thrusts in flying buttresses (left) and structure of a groin vault (above)

  13. Dome: 3-dimensional equivalent of an arch.Pantheon, Rome, 118-128 AD. Temple to “all the gods”

  14. Pantheon, Rome, 118-128 AD. Construction of the dome (concrete).

  15. Interior of dome of Pantheon is semi- circular (hemispherical)

  16. Outward thrust of the dome taken by 8 m thick composite heavy wall

  17. Pantheon: Interior. Biggest clear span until 19th century

  18. Pantheon: Interior. Light provided by circular hole (“occulus”) in the top

  19. Hagia, Sophia, Istanbul, 537 AD. Largest church for 9 centuries.

  20. Hagia, Sophia, Istanbul, 537 AD. Interior, showing support system for central dome

  21. Hagia, Sophia, Istanbul, 537 AD. Schematic showing support system for central dome

  22. Hagia, Sophia, Istanbul, 537 AD.

  23. Comparison of sizes of various domes

  24. Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence, Italy. Begun in 1296. “Segmented dome” added by Brunelleschi in 1436. 42 m span, 91 m high. Built without “centering”

  25. Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence, Italy. Begun in 1296. Dome added by Brunelleschi in 1436. 42 m span, 91 m high. Built without “centering” Shape is arch “a quinto acuto”

  26. Dome of Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence, is not hemispherical, but is made up of 8 segments.

  27. St Peter’s Basilica, Rome, Michaelangelo, 1546

  28. Dome of St Peter’s Basilica, Rome, Michaelangelo, 1546

  29. Interior of St Peter’s Basilica, Rome, showing dome resting on four arches supported by four great pillars

  30. “Hanging chain” analysis of Dome of St Peter’s, by Giovani Poleni, 1742

  31. Gateway Arch, St Louis, USA. This free-standing arch is 630 ft. high and the world's tallest. Built of triangular section of double-walled stainless steel, the space between the skins being filled with concrete after each section was placed. Looks like perfect “inverted catenary” shape.

  32. Interior of Carmel Mission. Built in 1793 it is an interesting design in that the walls curve inward towards the top, and the roof consists of a series of inverted catenary arches built of native sandstone quarried from the nearby Santa Lucia Mountains. (Carmel, California)

  33. St Paul’s Cathedral, London (1675-1708). Christopher Wren

  34. St Paul’s Cathedral Dome

  35. St Paul’s Cathedral Dome (3 domes inside each other)

  36. Hooke’s “hanging chain” concept applied to the dome of Christopher Wren’s St Paul’s Cathedral. The “lantern” on top of the dome distorts the “chain”

  37. Sources The pictures contained in this presentation were either downloaded from the Internet, or scanned in from books. The sources are too numerous to list.