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Intervention in Natural Environments: Setting the Stage for a Lifetime of Learning. Kat Stremel Pip Campbell Sheila Pearson. Challenges to Implementation. Theoretical Frameworks Preservice Training Service Provider Knowledge Service Provider Experience & Skills.

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Intervention in Natural Environments: Setting the Stage for a Lifetime of Learning


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intervention in natural environments setting the stage for a lifetime of learning

Intervention in Natural Environments: Setting the Stage for a Lifetime of Learning

Kat Stremel

Pip Campbell

Sheila Pearson

challenges to implementation
Challenges to Implementation
  • Theoretical Frameworks
  • Preservice Training
  • Service Provider Knowledge
  • Service Provider Experience & Skills
a framework of implementation
A Framework of Implementation
  • Source: Core intervention practices
  • Communication Link #1: Training, coaching, supporting interventionists and teachers
  • Communication Link #2: Collaborating, coaching, supporting families as major providers
  • Destination: Child/Youth and families within home, communities, daily routines and activities

(Based on Fixsen et al. 2005)

core components of natural environment practice
Relationships with families

Assessment in the environment

Identification and use of locations, settings, activities/routines

Outcomes-based Decisions

Environmental arrangements and adaptations

Child-individualized intervention strategies

Evaluation

Generalization

Core Components of Natural Environment Practice
critical qualities of child assessment
Asset & interest based

Acceptable to families

Authentic: Observed in natural environment

Typical behavior across routines

Reflect different perspectives, including families

(Based on Neisworth and Bagnato – 2005)

Accommodate the child’s motor and sensory development

Sensitive to show progress

Materials validated

Critical Qualities of Child Assessment
identification and use of locations settings activities and routines
Identification and Use of Locations, Settings, Activities, and Routines
  • Family routines
  • Parenting routines
  • Child routines
  • Play
  • Physical play
  • Entertainment
  • Family rituals and celebrations
  • Socialization activities

(Dunst, Hamby, Trivette, Raab & Bruder, 2000)

outcomes based decision making
Outcomes Based Decision-Making
  • Increasingaccess to locations, settings, activities
  • Increasing participation
  • Increasing family enjoyment
  • Building relationships or skills for development
  • Decreasing behavior that interferes with learning
  • Promoting acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of learning skills
environmental arrangements adaptations assistive technology
Environmental Arrangements, Adaptations & Assistive Technology
  • Children with physical and sensory disabilities
  • Common “Wait to Fail” strategies in EC
  • Resources for families
development of child individualized intervention strategies
Development of Child-Individualized Intervention Strategies
  • Families best know the interests and characteristics of their children
  • Service providers should know which intervention techniques (evidence-based practice) works best for which child, for what purpose, under what circumstance.
  • Natural environment practice is only as effective as the intervention techniques that are individually designed for children
meet cass at 2 years of age
Meet Cass at 2 years of age
  • OSEP-Funded Early Childhood Program
  • Parent Participation…”this makes sense so I don’t rush through the activities Cass enjoys to “work” on her therapy, but aren’t you asking me to be her Speech Therapist, OP, PT, Early Interventionist and still give her a bath?”
  • Initially identified 32 skills to target during undressing, bathing, hair drying routine.
early skills areas to target
Early Skills Areas to Target
  • Vision
  • Hearing
  • Physical
  • Communication
  • Cognitive
  • Health
cass bathing routine
Cass: Bathing Routine
  • Increase participation in continued movement
  • Increase head control
  • Increase reach to grasp
  • Increase grasping objects
  • Increase visual fixation
  • Increase response to voice
  • Increase anticipation through touch and object cues (adaptations)
cass at 19 years of age
Cass at 19 years of age
  • Skill areas that remain critical
teaching strategies that remain relevant
Teaching Strategies that remain relevant
  • Partial or full participation
  • Responsiveness to self-determination & self-initiations
  • Opportunities for choice making
  • Opportunities for higher forms/functions of communication
  • Consistent prompts, cues, waiting for responses
  • Reinforcement and feedback
  • Utilization routines and activities for learning
components for implementation
Components for Implementation
  • Selection of practitioners who are qualified to carry out child interventions
  • Provision of preservice or inservice training
  • Use of ongoing consultant/coaching within the environments where interventions will be practiced
  • Assessments of practitioner performance
  • Evaluation of the Early Intervention Program (Campbell)
  • Provision of administrative support and leadership

(Fixsen et al. 2005)