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Student Perspectives of the Early College Program at Indian Hills Community College

Student Perspectives of the Early College Program at Indian Hills Community College

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Student Perspectives of the Early College Program at Indian Hills Community College

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  1. Student Perspectives of the Early College Program at Indian Hills Community College Greg Kepner IACTE Conference June 28, 2011

  2. Advanced Technology Center

  3. IHCC Advanced Manufacturing

  4. IHCC Advanced Manufacturing Early College Pilot Program → 36 Credit Diploma

  5. Early College Key Concepts • Students attend both High School and IHCC • Students take required courses at High School • Students attend IHCC 3 hours per day • Junior year – students earn 18 college credits • Senior year – students earn 18 college credits • Diploma in Electronics Technician • Students can enter any of 3 programs: Lasers, Robotics, Electronics Engineering • Students can complete an A.A.S. degree in 1 year

  6. Junior Year (HS) FALL TERM Credits ELT373 DC Circuit Analysis 4 MAT742 Technical Math 2 WINTER TERM ELT378 AC Circuit Analysis 4 MAT761 Technical Math for Electronics 2 SPRING TERM ELT550 Analog Devices 4 ELT505 Power Transfer Technology 2

  7. Senior Year (HS) FALL TERM Credits CSC110 Introduction to Computers 3 COM725 Workplace Communications 2 WINTER TERM EGT420PLTW Digital Electronics3 ###### Cultural elective 3 SPRING TERM LEO101 Photonics Concepts 4 MATXXXMath elective 3

  8. After High School Graduation • Earn an Associate of Applied Science degree in 1 year after high school • Laser/Electro-optics Technology • Robotics/Automation Technology • Electronics Engineering Technology

  9. After IHCC Graduation • Accept career opportunities with companies: • Salaries ranging from $36 – 60,000 year • Insurance benefit plans • Tuition reimbursement • Performance & signing bonus • Vacations • 401K • Relocation expenses • Stock options • Overtime pay

  10. Boston Scientific Coherent, Inc. Cutting Edge Optronics Intel Corporation Kimmon LasX Laser Labs, Inc. Laserage Technology Lawrence Livermore National Lab Los Almos National Lab Metal Processing Solutions National RP Support NP Photonics Northrop Grumman Photonics Inc. Preco Laser Systems Raytheon Samsung Spectra Physics TLC Vision University of Nebraska Companies that offer career opportunities in Lasers/Photonics

  11. American Ordnance Automated Concepts Inc. Becton-Dickinson Medical Cargill Carl Zeiss IMT Corporation Electrical Contractors Engineered Plastic Components Felsomat Forte Automation Genesis Systems Group Hawkeye Group Hutchinson Technologies Intel Corporation KOMAX Automation Lomont Molding Monsanto Ortech Pella Corporation Plastics Unlimited Polarfab Samsung Vector Corporation Wellman Fansteel Wes-Tech Automation Companies that offer career opportunities in Robotics

  12. Alliant Energy Communications Engineering Cypress Semiconductor Citywide Heating and Cooling Electronic Contracting KYOU Fox TV MCG McLeod USA MUSCO Lighting NCR Rockwell-Collins Skyworks U.S. Cellular Intel Corporation Northrop Grumman Polarfab Samsung Clow Corporation Bernard Telephone Company A+ Communications Los Almos National Lab Mark Twain Rural Telephone Trion Technologies Texas Instruments OAO Alliance Atwood Electric Companies that offer career opportunities in Electronics:

  13. After IHCC Graduation • Continue education at universities with articulations: • University of Northern Iowa • William Penn University • Buena Vista University • University of Iowa • Iowa State University • Earn a Bachelor’s degree in 2 additional years

  14. First Early College Students

  15. When students were asked: “What do you like about your Early College Program” They responded with the following comments.

  16. “I like the fact that I’m earning dual credit.” Gary

  17. “The program gives me an idea about my career and if I would like to go into Lasers.” Michael

  18. “I like earning college credit and it’s fun.” Tyler

  19. “It kind of eases you into what college life is like.” Cory

  20. “It’s free and you get a head start to earn college credits.” Austin

  21. “I like it because you get an early start to a better life.” Aaron

  22. “It’s the best thing that ever came my way in my entire life. I just wish I could have started sooner.” Steven

  23. Considerations & Challenges • Transportation • Dual Credit / Concurrent enrollment • Math preparedness of students • Daily/Friday tutoring offered • Schedule considerations • Snow days, block schedules, start, end, breaks

  24. Abstract The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the experiences of 3 Early College Program students at Indian Hills Community College in Ottumwa, Iowa. The overarching theme and focus of this study is the exploration of the student’s personal educational experiences and peer interactions while participating in the Early College Program. One-on-one interviews with students provide qualitative data representing individual student experiences. The goals of the study are (a) to promote continuous improvement of the program, (b) to add to current knowledge about the program, (c) to improve practice in the program, and (d) to inform policy debate issues.

  25. The Issue • Concurrent enrollment programs have been steadily expanding in Iowa and across the United States. • The Early College Program at Indian Hills Community College is a concurrent enrollment program. • There is a need to study student experiences in concurrent enrollment programs.

  26. Purpose • The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the experiences of 3 Early College Program students at Indian Hills Community College in Ottumwa, Iowa.

  27. Research Goals • To promote continuous improvement of the program. • To add to current knowledge about the program. • To improve practice in the program. • To inform policy debate issues.

  28. Research Questions • What is the Early College Program experience? • How do Early College Program students interact with their peers? • How do Early College Program students value their education? • How do Early College Program students intend to transfer or utilize their education?

  29. Literature Review Map The Phenomena of Dual Enrollment Programs Smith, 2007; Kisker, 2006; Bailey, Morest, 2006 Types of Programs Student Experiences Early College Programs Lieberman, 2004; Newton, 2008; Glick, 2006; Smerdon, Means, 2005; National High School Center, 2007; Wolk, 2005; Best Practices of Dual Enrollment Squires, Case, 2008; Cech, 2008; Marcy, 2006 Post Secondary Enrollment Opportunities (PSEO) Smith, Place, Biddle, Raisch, Johnson, Wildenhaus, 2007 Sethna, Wickstrom, Boothe, Stanley, 2001 Career Academies Kemple, Willner, 2008; U.S. Department of Education, 2006 Benefits of Dual Enrollment Karp, Hughes, 2008; Harnish, Lynch, 2005; Born, 2006; Andrews, 2004; Miller, 2001; Newton, 2008; Palaich, Augenblick, Anderson, Rose, 2006 Dual Enrollment Outcomes Gertge, 2008; Lekes, Bragg, Loeb, Oleksiw, Marszalek, Brooks-LaRaviere, Zhu, Kremidas, Akukwe, Lee, Hood, 2007; Andrews, Barnett, 2002 Policy Considerations Krueger, 2006; Kisker, 2006; Boswell, 2000; Challenges of Dual Enrollment Farrell, Siefert, 2007 Need for Further Study: Policy for Future Dual Enrollment Programs Question: Should dual enrollment programs be expanded and supported for high school students?

  30. Significance of Concurrent Enrollment • Concurrent enrollment is important because there are now concurrent enrollment programs in all 50 states and this phenomena is still growing. • Concurrent enrollment is important to secondary and post-secondary leaders, faculty, administrators, student services, students, citizens, policymakers, educators, and researchers.

  31. Methodology • Qualitative study • Method: Narrative research design • Central phenomenon: Student experiences • Focus: Student perspectives • Sample: Purposeful, convenience, typical • Data collection: Student interviews

  32. Data Collection Procedures • Permission to interview participants • IHCC Institutional Review Board • IHCC Administrative gatekeepers • Participant interviews • 3 willing participants • Digitally recorded interviews • Held on-site at IHCC • Confidentiality maintained using alias names

  33. Data Analysis • Interviews transcribed • Preliminary exploratory analysis • Data coded for themes and categories • Divided into segments • In vivo codes identified • Interconnections and layers revealed • Descriptions built to represent perspectives

  34. Validation Methods • Triangulation • 3 Early College study participants • Early College instructors • IHCC administrators • Member checking for accuracy • External audit of study • Dean, Advanced Technology Division • Assistant to the President, Governmental Affairs • Project Director, Community Based Jobs Training

  35. Findings • College atmosphere • Schedules • Peer interactions • Growth and maturity • Academic rigor • Challenges

  36. Findings (continued) • Career development • Educational aspirations • Financial savings • Future earnings • Likes and dislikes • Recommendations • Reflections

  37. How did you interact with students from other high schools?

  38. How did you interact with students from other high schools? Ben Adkins: We kind of at first stuck around with the people from my own school and then eventually after a while we all kind of came together.

  39. How did you interact with students from other high schools? Thomas Underwood: When you’re in high school, you don’t want to mix with other high schools, it’s like a rivalry, but when you’re here, you’re in a team. Before we were done with high school we had already made friends with people from these other high schools.

  40. How were you treated by instructors and students?

  41. How were you treated by instructors and students? Norman Vandenburg: Everyone was really nice and they helped you out. They accepted you.

  42. How did you interact with college freshman?

  43. How did you interact with college freshman? Ben Adkins : At first it was kind of, you know, like, different because you were with some people that were older, but it was actually a good experience because it made you feel like you were actually like, in college.

  44. Was the age difference an issue?

  45. Was the age difference an issue? Norman Vandenburg: I don’t think it was a problem. It was kind of, kind of nice to be in class with some older people who’ve had a lot of experience out in the real world and knowledge and stuff like that. I think it was a good experience.

  46. Do you think maturity is an issue at the junior versus senior level?

  47. Do you think maturity is an issue at the junior versus senior level? Thomas Underwood : There is a lot of people that would be scared to go to college as a junior or a senior because they just don’t think that they can handle it. They need to realize that this isn’t harder than high school because you get to do what you like. In high school, you get to do things that you don’t like so you don’t want to be there.

  48. Did instructors have the same academic expectations for you?

  49. Did instructors have the same academic expectations for you? Thomas Underwood : We were just like everybody else in Business Essentials. We were expected to do the exact same thing.

  50. Did instructors have the same academic expectations for you? Norman Vandenburg: Yeah, uh-huh, even if we were, some of us were still playing sports in high school so we had to play at sports that night, still the same expectations.