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  1. The Value of Aviation Internship Programs Louis A. Scala Department of Aviation Farmingdale State University of New York

  2. Introduction/Welcome • Louis A. Scala • Associate Professor. • Department of Aviation. • Farmingdale, State University of New York.

  3. Objective of Today’s Program • We want you to leave today’s session with some basic knowledge about: • Aviation related internships. • The advantages of aviation related internships. • Sources of interns and • Partnerships and/or assistance available to develop an internship program.

  4. Objective of Today’s Program • We also want you to hear some success stories about aviation internships consider implementing an internship program at your airport.

  5. Lou Scala’s Story: • Aviation High School. • SUNY Farmingdale—Aerospace Technology • New York University. • College of Aeronautics. • AMT Instructor.

  6. Lou Scala’s Story • SUNY Farmingdale • Assistant Professor • Aircraft Systems • Aircraft Powerplants • My transition in the Brave New World of Airports! • Diamond Jim Brady’s daughter. “My daddy works at JFK.” • The birth of “field trip learning in the classroom.” (Waldvogel)

  7. Lou Scala’s Story • Academic Leave (1999) • AAAE ASOS class at JFK…meeting Steve Quilty and his advice! • Technical Knowledge and • Practical Experience is essential.

  8. Lou Scala’s Story • Steve Quility influenced the development of the BS Degree in Airport Management at Farmingdale, State University of New York.

  9. Lou Scala’s Story • Professor Scala’s mentors: • Bill DeGraff. • Guilermo Felix. • Ken Kroll. • Hugh Jones. • Stephen Williams. • Warren Kroppell • Bob Junge. • Al Graser.

  10. Lou Scala’s Story • Professor Scala’s mentors: • Pam Phillips • Tom Felix • Jen Dermody • Daisy Mather • Al Werner. • Evelyn Martinez. • Vincent Cimino (Honorable Obi Wan! ).

  11. Lou Scala’s Story • BS Degree in Airport Management: • Liberal Arts and Science. • Business Management. • Aviation Core Courses. • Airport Management Courses. • Internships Needed! • Goal: • AAAE C.M. Certification for FSUNY Grads

  12. Internship—Success Stories  • Evelyn Martinez • Dowling College • Mentor Pam Phillips • PANYNJ Intern • Mentor—Vince Cimino • Intern FAA Airports Division • Presently working with FAA Airports Division as a ACSI and Compliance Officer.

  13. Internship—Success Stories  • Louis Lorate • Vaughn College • Mentor—Vince Cimino • Intern FAA Airports Division • Presently working with FAA Washington ADO as a Community Planner

  14. Internship—Success Stories  • Courtney Liedler • SUNY Farmingdale • Mentor—Vince Cimino • Intern FAA Airports Division • Presently working with the NTSB as an Accident Investigator

  15. Internship—Success Stories  • Mahendra Raghubeer • Vaughn College • Mentor—Vince Cimino • Intern FAA Airports Division • Presently working with FAA NYADO as a Community Planner

  16. Internship—Success Stories  • Ryan Heeralall • SUNY Farmingdale • Mentor—Vince Cimino. • Intern FAA Airports Division • Presently working with FAA contractor and is assigned to the FAA Eastern Region Runway Safety Program.

  17. Internship—Success Stories  • Shedrock Neil • SUNY Farmingdale • Mentor—Vince Cimino. • Intern FAA Airports Division • Presently working with Delta Airlines at LGA

  18. Internship—Success Stories  • Monica Romero • SUNY Farmingdale • Mentor—John Lauth • Presently working with AvPorts FRG Financial/Administration Department.

  19. Internship—Success Stories  • Michael Simon • SUNY Farmingdale • Mentor—Bill L./John Lauth • Presently working with AvPorts FRG as an Airport Operations Coordinator.

  20. Internship—Success Stories  • Shawn Byers • SUNY Farmingdale • Mentor—Vince Cimino. • Intern FAA Airports Division • Presently working with AvPorts FRG as an Airport Operations Coordinator. • Presently working as an Operations Supervisor at BWI/TM airport.

  21. Internship—Success Stories  • Khern Forde • Vaughn College • Presently an Airport Operations Coordinator at Teterboro Airport, NJ.

  22. Internship—Success Stories  • Michelle Grasso • SUNY Farmingdale • Mentor—Vince Cimino • Intern FAA Airports Division • Former Operations Coordinator at Westchester County Airport. • Presently FAA Airports Division Airport Safety Certification Assistant.

  23. Internship—Success Stories  • Joanna Zyskowska • SUNY Farmingdale • Vaughn College • Mentor—Vince Cimino • Intern at FAA Airports Division. • Terminal 4 Operations Coordinator • Presently Airport Operations Coordinator Westchester County Airport, NY

  24. Internship—Success Stories  • Arianne Reyes • Vaughn College • Mentor—Vince Cimino • Intern at FAA Airports Division. • Presently an Airport Operations Coordinator at Teterboro Airport, NJ.

  25. Internship 101 • An internship is a learning opportunity for a student to explore a career. • It is usually a temporary situation. • Some internships are paid and others are offered for credit. (Long Island Works Coalition)

  26. Internship 101 • Internships are designed to teach students how to combine theory and applicable skills to solve complex problems. (Sikorsky)

  27. Internship 101 • An internship is typically a one-time work or service experience done by a student who has attained at least some academic preparation in a professional field.

  28. Internship 101 • The student: • Can be an advanced undergraduate or graduate student • Works in a professional setting under the supervision of at least one practicing professional…Many offer pay, but quite a few don’t. • Most are done for academic credit. (JobWeb.com, National Association of Colleges and Universities)

  29. Internship 101 • “Historically the intern or apprentice, included those wishing to develop skills which would provide a lifelong profession by apprenticing themselves to a “master craftsman.” (Sikorsky)

  30. Internship 101 • In order to become skilled at a particular trade…an individual would work side by side with a more experienced professional who was willing to take the time to teach his specialty in a “hands on” fashion. • Such apprenticeships…continue to this very day. (Sikorsky)

  31. Internship 101 • Examples of internships and apprenticeships: • Construction and building trades (Journeyman to Master). • Medical profession (Internship to Residency). • Legal profession (Clerkship). • Graduate studies (Fellowships).

  32. Internship 101 • Many of the best colleges in the U.S. have concluded that internship training is vital for students to become experts in their respective course of study. (Sikorsky)

  33. Internship 101—Co-ops • A cooperative education experience is generally completed by a student over more than one semester. • It includes work assignments related to the participant’s academic and career interests. • Co-op students are almost always paid, and their work is considered productive to the employer.

  34. Internship 101—Co-ops • The typical program plan is for students to alternate terms of full-time classroom study with terms are full-time, discipline-related employment. • Most co-op programs involve some sort of academic credit. (JobWeb.com)

  35. Internship 101—Practicum • A practicum is generally a one-time work or service experience done by a student as a part of an academic class. • “Virtual Internships in Airport Operations Management” for AVN 470 and APM 485 Classes. • Some practicums offer pay, but many don’t. • Almost all are done for academic credit. (JobWeb.com)

  36. Internship 101—Externships or Job Shadowing Experiences • An externship or job shadowing experience allows a student to spend between a day and several weeks observing a professional on the job (i.e. Shadowing ACSI Vince Cimino). • Such experiences are unpaid, however some colleges and universities pick up travel and/or living expenses.

  37. Internship 101—Externships or Job Shadowing Experiences • Externships and job shadowing experiences are generally not done for academic credit. (JobWeb.com)

  38. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Interns usually have a strong desire to learn. • Internships provide: • Job experience for the student. • Networking opportunities. • A “taste and see” potential employee evaluation opportunity for the organization. (Long Island Works)

  39. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • In an article entitled, Internship Programs: A Win-Win Business Opportunity. Katherine Rupp, Marketing Manager for the LI Works Coalition, observed several advantages: • Shared Value. • Staff Support. • Name Recognition. • Saves Employment Costs. • Good for the Economy.

  40. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Shared Value: • An internship is a short term work experience which emphases hands on and professional development for the student. • In return for this learning experience, students provide assistance to their host organizations by completing tasks and projects of real business value. • Internships can be paid or unpaid.

  41. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Staff Support: • Internship benefit’s your organization • Provides your organization with talented and trained assistance without adding to your headcount, and allows for better utilization of full-time personnel. • Interns can perform professional and paraprofessional duties: • Short term projects. • Contribute to long term projects and staff support.

  42. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Name Recognition: • Helps to generate a positive community image • FAA summer program for high school students. • Summer of Aviation at Republic (SOAR). • Internship program can increase the name recognition of the airport and provide a means for forging bonds with local schools and colleges. • This form of community involvement demonstrates an interest in the future of local students and the local economy by promoting workforce readiness.

  43. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Saves Employment Costs: • Gives businesses a chance to evaluate potential employees while they are still in school: • Charles Seliga, Stewart International Airport. • Employers offer full-time employment to 56.9% of their interns (National Association of Colleges and Employers). • This lowers the recruitment and training costs.

  44. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Saves Employment Costs: • Internships are a useful recruitment tool. • They give an employer/supervisor the opportunity to train and interact with the intern on a regular basis, providing them with a much clearer picture of the potential employee than an interview would. • Gives the intern a realistic picture of the potential working environment before accepting a position, cutting down on turnover. (Rupp)

  45. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Good for the Economy: • Internships give students a professional edge by providing them with real business experience while they are still in school. • Internship programs also strengthen the future workforce by increasing the number of available workers with the professionalism and skills businesses look for.

  46. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Good for the Economy: • Skilled successful professionals strengthen both the organization they work for through productivity and the community in which they live through financial assets gained from their careers. • Note: The “Multiplier Effect.”

  47. Internship 101—Advantages of Internships • Interns are useful computer savvy individuals. • Interns are usually highly motivated and eager to start gaining valuable work experience. • Internships provide career guidance to the intern and networking opportunities between the students and airport professionals.

  48. Internship 101—Disadvantages of Internships • Internships are not for everyone. • It takes a student who is willing to put in the time and an airport that has a need to put an aspiring airport professional to productive use. (Hopper)

  49. Internship 101—Getting Started • Many schools and college career centers can provide specific information a business needs to host one of there interns. • Educational institutions often have programs requirements in place for students if the internships are for credit. (Rupp)

  50. Internship 101—Getting Started • Businesses can request interns directly or from a school or visit websites of organizations that offer assistance. (Rupp)