slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Race, Hispanic Origin, and Socioeconomic Status: Motor Vehicle Occupant Death Rates and Risk Factors Among Adults PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Race, Hispanic Origin, and Socioeconomic Status: Motor Vehicle Occupant Death Rates and Risk Factors Among Adults

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 13

Race, Hispanic Origin, and Socioeconomic Status: Motor Vehicle Occupant Death Rates and Risk Factors Among Adults - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 638 Views
  • Uploaded on

Race, Hispanic Origin, and Socioeconomic Status: Motor Vehicle Occupant Death Rates and Risk Factors Among Adults Elisa R. Braver, Ph.D Background: Previous Research on Race/Hispanic Origin and Motor Vehicle Deaths Conflicting data – some studies found higher risk, some did not

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Race, Hispanic Origin, and Socioeconomic Status: Motor Vehicle Occupant Death Rates and Risk Factors Among Adults' - elina


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Race, Hispanic Origin, and Socioeconomic Status: Motor Vehicle Occupant Death Rates and Risk Factors Among Adults

Elisa R. Braver, Ph.D

background previous research on race hispanic origin and motor vehicle deaths
Background: Previous Research on Race/Hispanic Origin and Motor Vehicle Deaths
  • Conflicting data – some studies found higher risk, some did not
  • Most studies did not consider extent of exposure to vehicle travel
    • One study: observed large increase in death rates per vehicle-mile of travel among black and Hispanic male teenagers in U.S. (Baker et al., 1998)
objectives of study
Objectives of Study
  • Are black, Hispanic, and low socioeconomic-status (SES) adults in U.S. at higher risk of dying in motor vehicle crashes when they travel in vehicles?
  • If there is an excess risk among blacks and Hispanics, is it due to average lower SES?
  • Are risk factors for occupant deaths more common among adults who are black, Hispanic, or of lower SES?
data sources
Data Sources
  • 1995 Fatality Analysis Reporting System (census of fatal crashes in U.S.) linked with death certificate data
  • 1995 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (telephone sample of national travel patterns)
methods
Methods
  • Education was SES indicator
    • Less than high school
    • High school only
    • Greater than high school
  • Racial/ethnic categories
    • Non-Hispanic white
    • Non-Hispanic black
    • Hispanic
  • Ages 25-64
  • Passenger vehicle occupant death rates calculated per vehicle trip
  • Risk factors among fatally injured drivers compared by:
    • Race/Hispanic origin
    • Gender
    • SES
slide6
1995 Passenger Vehicle Occupant Deaths per 10 Million Trips by Race/Hispanic Origin and SESFor Both Genders, Ages 25-64

< high

school

high

school

> high

school

white

black

Hispanic

Race/Hispanic Origin

Education Level

slide7
1995 Passenger Vehicle Occupant Deaths per 10 Million Trips by SES and Race/Hispanic OriginMen,Ages 25-64
risk factors
Risk Factors

Belts

  • Non-use common among all drivers killed in crashes
  • Less use among low-SES drivers killed in crashes (men’s use rates: 19% if had no high school degree, 42% if had education beyond high school)
  • Blacks: lower use rates than whites if they had at least a high school degree (men with education past high school: 36% if black; 42% if white)
  • Hispanics: use rates  whites with same education
risk factors9
Risk Factors

Alcohol

  • Alcohol-impaired driving common among all male drivers killed in crashes
  • More common among low-SES drivers killed in crashes (men: 60% if had no high school degree, 40% if had education beyond high school)
  • Hispanic men: non-significant increases within same SES groups (high school degree only: 61% if Hispanic, 56% if white)
  • Black men: non-significant decreases if had at least a high school degree (high school degree only: 52% if black)
conclusions
Conclusions
  • Socioeconomic status: strongest determinant of occupant mortality risk per trip
  • Blacks, especially black men, and Hispanic men had higher overall occupant death rates per trip than whites
  • SES explained higher risk of Hispanic men, partly explained it among blacks. Higher SES less protective among blacks
  • Non-use of belts and alcohol-impaired driving explains some but not all of the excess risk observed among blacks, Hispanics, low SES adults.
public health implications
Public Health Implications

Need

  • Public knowledge of belt and alcohol laws, perception that laws will be enforced
  • Enforcement that is impartial and community-wide; should include community organizations in planning of programs
  • Stronger belt laws
  • More effective enforcement of alcohol-impaired driving laws (sobriety checkpoints are underused)
slide13

White

Black

Hispanic

1995 Passenger Vehicle Occupant Deaths per 10 Million Trips by SES, Gender, and Race/Hispanic OriginAges 25-54

Men

Women