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Political Cartoons. Visual Protests. Origins of the political cartoon. Began as caricatures in the time of Leonardo da Vinci (1400s)

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political cartoons

Political Cartoons

Visual Protests

origins of the political cartoon
Origins of the political cartoon
  • Began as caricatures in the time of Leonardo da Vinci (1400s)
  • Editorial elements (aka commentary) emerged in the time of Martin Luther (1500s) where he used ‘political cartoons’ in his pamphlets to rail against the Catholic Church
  • Makes its way to North America with works by Benjamin Franklin (1750s)
the high point of political cartoons
The high-point of political cartoons
  • The 19th and 20th century are times of great change in many parts of the world, especially related to politics, therefore political cartoons feature prominently in pamphlets, magazines, and newspapers
what s the point of a political cartoon
What’s the point of a political cartoon?
  • Takes serious issues and presents them in a funny way that is more socially acceptable
    • Doesn’t seem as harsh or critical as an editorial or an article communicating the same message or point of view
  • Designed to affect the viewer's opinion
  • Thus appeal and influence are key!
steps to analyze a political cartoon
STEPS TO ANALYZE A POLITICAL CARTOON

Read pgs 216-217 in textbook & make notes

step 1 establish a knowledge base
STEP 1: ESTABLISH A KNOWLEDGE BASE

Who is pictured in the cartoon?

What aspects do you recognize?

What does the caption say?

What wording is used in the cartoon?

step 2 identify the issue
STEP 2: IDENTIFY THE ISSUE

Using info from Step 1 answer the following:

What is the subject or message of the cartoon?

What particular issue is being identified?

What makes you think this?

What ‘evidence’ can you provide from the cartoon to support your determination?

step 3 determine devices
STEP 3: DETERMINE DEVICES

What stands out to you in the cartoon?

What ‘characters’ are in it? How do they look?

Remember to consider:

  • Caricature
  • Analogy
  • Symbols
  • Facial expressions & gestures
  • Words
step 4 identify bias
STEP 4: IDENTIFY BIAS

What is the cartoonist’s point of view?

Positive? Negative? (Rarely if ever is a cartoonist neutral!)

Remember to consider:

  • National/regional/local
  • Political
  • Racial/ethnic
  • Economic
  • Gender
  • Personal values
slide16
"Now mother's all-Canadian boy can go wave his all-Canadian flag while his all-Canadian father reads his all-Canadian magazine, and his all-Canadian mother watches her all-Canadian T.V., and we develop our all-Canadian culture...“ (Leonard Norris, Vancouver Sun, March 23, 1956)
slide17
STEP 1:

STEP 2:

STEP 3:

STEP 4:

who says we don t have national color and character leonard norris vancouver sun nov 16 1956
Who says we don’t have national color and character? (Leonard Norris, Vancouver Sun, Nov. 16, 1956)
slide19
STEP 1:

STEP 2:

STEP 3:

STEP 4:

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