Impact of Social Supports on Psychological Well Being - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

elina
impact of social supports on psychological well being l.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Impact of Social Supports on Psychological Well Being PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Impact of Social Supports on Psychological Well Being

play fullscreen
1 / 11
Download Presentation
Impact of Social Supports on Psychological Well Being
265 Views
Download Presentation

Impact of Social Supports on Psychological Well Being

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Impact of Social Supports on Psychological Well Being Barbra Bentley Qiana Cryer Danielle Fuller Tessa Mattie Alesha Oesterbo Briana Quinlan

  2. Background and Theory • Definition of fatherhood has shifted. • Research tends to be biased. • More Research is Needed! • For Clarification • Outdated Theory • Influence Policy Issues

  3. Background and Theory • Parental Acceptance-Rejection Theory (PARTheory) • Children of all cultures require warm parenting • 26% of children’s well being is determined by perceived acceptance from caregivers • In the African American community, social support, often stems from extended kin

  4. Research Question/Hypothesis • It is hypothesized that if a child has a greater level of perceived social support, then their psychological well being will be positively impacted.

  5. Results • Sources of Social Support Scale (SOSS) • Personality Assessment Questionnaire (PAQ) • Cross-sectional design • Two-tailed, bivariate Pearson’s correlation

  6. Results • Our results supported our hypothesis. • Results yielded a significant correlation ~ p= .00 • There was a weak and negative relationship~ r= -.28

  7. Discussion ~ Findings • Significant relationship between social support and psychological well being. • Findings were consistent with the hypothesis. • Findings were consistent with theoretical views.

  8. Discussion ~ Limitations • Cross-sectional Design • The Sample • Self-reported Data

  9. Discussion ~ Implications • Social Work Practice • Theory • Increased Research Knowledge Base • Policy • Program Expansion

  10. References • Coley, R. L. (2001). (In)visible men: Emerging research on low-income, unmarried, minority fathers. American Psychologist, 56(9), 743-753. • Elliott Brown, Karin A., Parker-Dominguez, T., & Sorey, M. (2000). Life stress, social support, and well-being among college-educated african american women. Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, 9(1/2), 55-73. • Griffin, M. L., Amodeo, M. A., Clay, C., Fassler, I., & Ellis, M. A. (2006). Racial differences in social support: Kin versus friends. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 76(3), 374-380. • Hamer, J. (2001). What it means to be daddy: Fatherhood for black men living away from their children. (pp. 1-55). New York: Columbia University Press. • Koeske, G. F., & Koeske, R. D. (N.D.). The sources of social support scale: Description, utility, and psychometric properties. Unpublished manuscript. • Lamb, M. (2000). The history of research on father involvement: An overview. In H. E. Peters, G. W. Perterson, S. K. Steinmetz & R. D. Day (Eds.), Fatherhood: Research, interventions and policies. (). New York: The Hawthorne Press. • Lamborn, S. D., & Nguyen, D. T. (2004). African American adolescents' perceptions of family interactions: Kinship support, parent-child relationships, and teen adjustment. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 33(6), 547-558. • McAdoo, J. L. (1993). The roles of african american fathers: An ecological perspective. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 74, 28-35.

  11. References • Morgan State University. Facts up front. Retrieved October 8, 2007 from http://www.morgan.edu/about-msu/facts.asp • Mosher, C. E., Prelow, H. M., Chen, W. W., & Yackel, M. E. (2006). Coping and social support as mediators of the relation of optimism to depressive symptoms among black college students. Journal of Black Psychology, 32(1), 72-86. • Rohner, R. P. (1986). PART's personality theory and its historical antecedents. In, The warmth dimension: Foundations of parental acceptance-rejection theory (pp. 66-87). Beverly Hills, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc. • Rohner, R. P., Kahlique, A., & Cournoyer, D. E. (2007). Parental acceptance-rejection theory, methods, evidence, and implications. Retrieved September 11, 2007 from http://www.cspar.com.uconn.edu • Rohner, R. P., & Veneziano, R. A. (2001). The importance of fatherly love: History and contemporary evidence. Review of General Psycology, 5(4), 382-405. • Taylor, R. J., Chatters, L. M., Tucker, M. B., & Lewis, E. (1990). Developments in research on black families: A decade review. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 52(4), 993-1014. • Taylor, R. D., Casten, R., & Flickinger, S. M. (1993). Influence of kinship social support on the parenting experiences and psychosocial adjustment of african-american adolescents. Developmental psychology, 29(2), 382-388. • U.S Department of Health and Human Services. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996. Retrieved September 21, 2007 from http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/ofa/prwora96.htm