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Japanese Food Practices. By: Kayla Thomas, Jill Henderson, Ashley Brine. Traditional Japanese Dietary P ractices. The traditional Japanese diet was high in carbohydrates and very low in fat and cholesterol Buddhism and Shinto Decline in meat

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Japanese Food Practices


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    1. Japanese Food Practices By: Kayla Thomas, Jill Henderson, Ashley Brine

    2. Traditional Japanese Dietary Practices • The traditional Japanese diet was high in carbohydrates and very low in fat and cholesterol • Buddhism and Shinto • Decline in meat • Natural taste with minimum artificial processes

    3. Food Habits Today • Pickled fruits and vegetables are consumed nearly every meal • Eating out and take out food is increasing • Fewer Japanese style sweets and more salty snacks • Bland food • Westernized diet is increasing in Japan • Bread and butter are becoming staples • Consumption of meat, milk and eggs is increasing • Common dishes? Yakisoba, Inarizushi, Udon, Gyoza

    4. Staple Foods • Soy bean products • Important component of cuisine • Tofu • Soy sauce • Miso • Edamame • Tempura • Lactose Intolerant? • Gohan: cooked rice or “meal” • Eaten with almost every meal • Sticky • Su: rice mixed with rice vinegar • Used in sushi • Sushi and wasabi

    5. Food Etiquette • Smaller individual portions • “Itadakimasu” • Eat with chopsticks • Soups are consumed directly from the bowl • Slurping soups and noodles is permitted and may be seen as a sign of appreciation • Meals are eaten at low tables- Kotatsu • Kneeling position with heels tucked under buttocks • Shoes are removed first • Each diner is obligated to fill his or her neighbor’s glass whenever it is half empty • Hosts choice what the guest will eat

    6. Obon Festival-of the dead • Buddhist custom to honor the spirits of one's ancestors…family reunion • Cremation • Food offerings such as vegetables and fruits • Lanterns and arrangements of flower

    7. Counseling Speak slowly and clearly Avoid negative questions Ask one question at a time Be aware of your audience • Limited eye contact • Neck or tie • Silence • Better to talk too little then too much • Ambiguous and indirect • Little explanation • Proximity • Reserved to touch and space • Saving Face • Criticism is personal

    8. Inarizushi • 1-1/4 C Sticky rice • ¼ C Rice Vinegar • 1 can fried bean curd • Dry tofu pocket. Mix vinegar with rice. Stuff and serve! • Where to buy ingredients? • Riverdale, UT

    9. References • Kittler, P., & Sucher, K. (2008).Foodand culture. (5 ed., pp. 334-344). Belmont: Thomson Higher Education. • http://www.cup.org/books/kiple/japan.htm • http://asiarecipe.com/japeathistory.html • http://gojapan.about.com/cs/japanesehistory/