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“ All learning has an emotional base. ” Plato PowerPoint Presentation
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“ All learning has an emotional base. ” Plato

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  1. “All learning has an emotional base.”Plato The Office of Talent Development

  2. Framework for TeachingDomain 2Classroom Environment Office of Talent Development April 9, 2013 The Office of Talent Development

  3. Outcomes • Review Components in Domain 2 • Increase teacher capacity by understanding, sharing, and discussing strategies for the importance of establishing a culture for learning and managing student behavior • Examine some classroom management strategies in order to implement effective preventions and interventions strategies for misbehavior. • Collaborate with Colleagues The Office of Talent Development

  4. Agenda PART I What Kind of Fruit are You? PART II Taking a Deeper Look at Domain II What are the Implications? PART III Conga Line Questions PART IV A.A.R. (After Action Review) Exit Ticket The Office of Talent Development

  5. Revisit the NORMS The Office of Talent Development

  6. P.E.M.D.A.S. Participate fully, put phones on vibrate Exchange Ideas Make an Effort to Listen Dialogue equally, do your best Ask Questions, Attention to Attitude Share your insight and support each other, self monitor, self reflect sidebar conversations The Office of Talent Development

  7. P.E.M.D.A.S. Expectation Please Engage in Meaningful Discussion with Active Self reflection! The Office of Talent Development

  8. PART I • What Kind of Fruit are You? The Office of Talent Development

  9. What learning is natural to you?

  10. What Kind of Fruit Are You? Directions: • Read across each row and place a 4 in the blank that best describes you. • Now place a 3 in the blank for the second word that best describes you. • Do the same for the final words using a 2 and a 1.

  11. Fruit, report to your corners 11

  12. Natural abilities… Learn best when… May have trouble… Expand their styles… Are there any melons?

  13. Are there any melons? Natural abilities includes: • Debating points of view • Finding solutions • Analyzing ideas • Determining value or importance Melons learn best when they: • Have access to resources • Can work independently • Are respected for intellectual ability • Follow traditional methods Melons may have trouble: • Working in groups • Being criticized • Convincing others diplomatically To expand their styles Melons need to: • Except imperfection • Consider all alternatives • Consider others feelings

  14. Are there any Bananas? • Natural abilities… • Learn best when… • May have trouble… • Expand their styles…

  15. Are there any Bananas? Natural abilities include: • Planning • Fact-finding • Organizing • Following directions Bananas learn best when they: • Have an orderly environment • Have specific outcomes • Can trust others to do their part • Have predictable situations Bananas may have trouble: • Understanding feelings • Dealing with oppositions • Answering “what if” questions To expand their styles, Bananas need to: • Express their own feelings more • Get explanations of others views • Be less rigid

  16. Who are my oranges? • Natural abilities… • Learn best when… • May have trouble… • Expand their styles…

  17. Who are my oranges? Natural abilities includes: • Experimenting • Being Independent • Being curious • Creating different approaches • Creating change Oranges learn best when they: • Can use trial and error • Produce real products • Can compete • Are self-directed Oranges may have trouble: • Meeting the limits • Following a lecture • Having few options or choices To expand their styles, Oranges need to: • Delegate responsibilities • Be more excepting of others’ ideas

  18. Last but not least the grapes • Natural abilities… • Learn best when… • May have trouble… • Expand their styles…

  19. Last but not least the grapes Natural abilities includes: • Being reflective • Being sensitive • Being flexible • Being creative • Preference for working in groups Grapes learn best when they: • Can work and share with others • Balance work with play • Can communicate • Are noncompetitive Grapes may have trouble: • Giving exact answers • Focusing on one thing at a time • Organizing To expand their styles, Grapes need to: • Pay more attention • Not rush into things • Be less emotional when making some decisions

  20. Establishing a Culture • How do you establish a culture to support those learners that are not like you? • You have 10 minutes to discuss, brainstorm and chart how you can support those student learners that are not like you.

  21. PART II • Taking a Deeper Look at • Domain II • What are the Implications? The Office of Talent Development

  22. 2b. Establishing a Culture for Learning What is your definition for a “culture for learning?” The culture for learning refers to the atmosphere and energy level in a classroom, where students are engaged in important work. 1 minute Quick Write

  23. What are the elements of Establishing a Culture for Learning (2b.)? • Importance of the Content • Expectations for Learning and Achievement • Student Pride in Work

  24. Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Component 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning Elements: Importance of the content, Expectations for learning and achievement, Student pride in work

  25. PART III • Conga Line The Office of Talent Development

  26. Conga Line Questions • What are the implications of classroom environment? • How do you convey to the students the sense that the work they are learning in the classroom is important? • What strategies do you use to cultivate and reinforce student curiosity?

  27. 2b. Establishing a Culture for Learning The culture for learning refers to the atmosphere and energy level in a classroom, where students are engaged in important work. 27

  28. 2d. Managing Student Behavior • Think about the last few weeks of school. • List one classroom management strategy that has worked well for you and one classroom management strategy that did not work. Share with a partner your strategies and the reasons why they worked or did not work.

  29. What is Classroom Management? Classroom management refers to the practices and procedures used by a teacher to ensure that teacher instruction and student learning will take place. In other words, what actions or strategies are you using to maintain order in the classroom?

  30. Why is classroom management important? According to 50 years of research, it is the number one factor governing student learning.

  31. The Effective Teacher has a Well-Managed Classroom! What Does Effective Classroom Management Look Like? What Does Effective Classroom Management Sound Like What Does Effective Classroom Management Feel Like?

  32. The Characteristics of a Well-Managed Classroom • Students are deeply engaged in their work. • Students know what is expected of them and they are successful. • Time is spent on task, with little confusion, or disruptions. • The climate is positive, cooperative, and work-oriented.

  33. How Can A Teacher Become an Effective Manager?

  34. 2d Managing Student Behavior

  35. The number one problem in the classroom is not discipline; it is the lack of procedures and routines”. Harry Wong Misbehavior often results because students have not been taught procedures and routines.

  36. Procedures and Routines • Procedures are how things are done. • Routines are procedures that are practiced and are done automatically by students.

  37. What are some procedures that are addressed in well-managed classroom? • Entering the classroom • Leaving the classroom • Tardy to class • Getting to work immediately • Participating in class discussions • Coming to attention • Passing in papers

  38. Procedures and Routines • Must be taught, rehearsed, and modeled for the students • Some procedures must be taught in the beginning of the year

  39. How to Teach Procedures • Explain the procedures • Rehearse them with the students • Reinforce the procedure

  40. Results of the implementation of effective procedures/routines • Reduction of discipline problems • Increased time on task and fewer disruptions • Order is established and maintained • Automatic desired student behavior without prompting

  41. Preparation Room is ready, lesson is ready, and the teacher is ready • Clear student expectations Students know before lesson begins what they are responsible for learning • Time on Task Discipline Plan is established and followed consistently and assignments are posted every day. • Work-oriented climate Procedures and routines have been taught and practiced.

  42. Discipline What is it? It is about how the student behaves. Every effective teacher has a discipline plan! If you do not have a discipline plan, then you plan to fail. Harry Wong

  43. Discipline Why do I need a discipline plan? To create a • Safe, orderly environment • Respectful, work-oriented environment

  44. Essential Elements of the Discipline Plan • Rules/Expectations Limit the number. Make them specific rather than general Post them. Send them home to the parents. Enforce them consistently. • Consequences Make sure the consequence is fair. • Rewards

  45. The Four Goals of Misbehavior • Attention-Seeking Behavior • Power-Seeking Behavior • Revenge-Seeking Behavior • Avoidance-of-Failure Behavior

  46. Guidelines for Intervention • Focus on the behavior, not the student. • Take charge of negative emotions. • Avoid escalating the situation. • Discuss misbehavior later. • Allow students to save face.

  47. When the Goal is Attention!Interventions Strategy 1: Minimize the Attention • Refuse to respond • Give the “Eye” • Stand close by • Use Name Dropping • Send a General/Secret Signal • Use an “I” message

  48. Attention Seeking Behavior Strategy 2: Clarify Desired Behavior • State “Grandma’s Law” • Use “Target-Stop-Do”

  49. When the Goal is Power! • The Rumbling Stage: Make a Graceful Exit • The Eruption Stage: Use time Out • The Resolution Stage: Set Consequences

  50. Prevention/Intervention Activity • Role-Play