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The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership . Global Health Council Conference Tuesday 14 June 2011 Hellen Gelband CDDEP. The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership--GARP.

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the global antibiotic resistance partnership

The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership

Global Health Council Conference

Tuesday 14 June 2011

HellenGelband

CDDEP

the global antibiotic resistance partnership garp
The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership--GARP

The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP) aims to address the challenge of antibiotic resistance by developing actionable policy proposals in four low- and middle-income countries: India, Kenya, South Africa and Vietnam

why garp
Why GARP?
  • Antibiotic resistance has been defined by high-income countries. Why it matters:
    • Access
    • Cost
  • Action takes place at the country level
    • Local knowledge
    • Locally-generated research
    • Sustainability
key elements
Key Elements
  • CDDEP organization
  • International Advisory Group
  • Working Groups in each country
  • Affiliations with premier medical and research organizations
  • Coordinators +/-
  • All sectors represented (human/animal, public/private sectors; urban/rural)
international advisory group iag
International Advisory Group--IAG

Keith Klugman, Emory University, Atlanta, Chair

ZulfiqarBhutta, Aga Khan University, Karachi

Adriano Duse, University of the Witwatersrand, Chair, GARP-South Africa NWG

NK Ganguly, National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi, Chair, GARP-India NWG

David Heymann, Health Protection Agency, London

Dean Jamison, University of Washington

Samuel Kariuki, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Chair, GARP-Kenya NWG

Nguyen Van Kinh, National Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Hanoi, Chair, GARP-Vietnam NWG

Eric Simoes, University of Colorado

international advisory group iag1
International Advisory Group--IAG

Keith Klugman, Emory University, Atlanta, Chair

ZulfiqarBhutta, Aga Khan University, Karachi

Adriano Duse, University of the Witwatersrand, Chair, GARP-South Africa NWG

NK Ganguly, National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi, Chair, GARP-India NWG

David Heymann, Health Protection Agency, London

Dean Jamison, University of Washington

Samuel Kariuki, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Chair, GARP-Kenya NWG

Nguyen Van Kinh, National Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Hanoi, Chair, GARP-Vietnam NWG

Eric Simoes, University of Colorado

interesting and useful findings
Interesting and Useful Findings
  • In all GARP countries, sufficient data can be found to support high levels of antibiotic resistance, at least in some places
  • No GARP country has a functioning surveillance system to monitor trends
  • Information on antibiotic use in animals is incomplete
  • Most studies concentrate on urban areas and hospitals
policy ideas
Policy Ideas

Reducing Antibiotic Demand

  • Vaccines
  • Infection control in hospitals
  • Eliminating some animal use (e.g., growth promotion)

Altering Antibiotic Supply

  • Restricting sales of advanced drugs (e.g., carbapenems in India)
evidence based change in policy and practice the garp strategy
Evidence-Based Change in Policy and Practice: The GARP Strategy
  • All options identified, a small number chosen
  • Thorough and transparent analysis
    • Feasibility, cost, acceptability, etc.—specific to the country situation
  • Presented to the right people and organizations
  • Local supporting evidence, when possible

The Critical Path

evidence based change in policy and practice the garp strategy 2
Evidence-Based Change in Policy and Practice: The GARP Strategy [2]
  • Becoming a trusted source
  • Seizing opportunities for input
    • E.g., news stories about infections, antibiotic resistance, drug prices
  • Persistence

Opportunist Path

garp phase 2 the next 3 years
GARP Phase 2: The Next 3 Years
  • Deepening the relationship in the GARP founding countries
  • Expanding the partnership: GARP phase 2 countries
  • Structuring the partnership itself
  • Developing tools: PneuMOD, DRI
  • Developing a sustainable plan for the future
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