‘Not Normal’ Classroom Norms Minnie Liu and Peter Liljedahl Simon Fraser University - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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‘Not Normal’ Classroom Norms Minnie Liu and Peter Liljedahl Simon Fraser University

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  1. ‘Not Normal’ Classroom NormsMinnie Liu and Peter LiljedahlSimon Fraser University

  2. “Unlike mathematics, numeracy does not so much lead toward in an ascending pursuit of abstraction as it moves outward toward an ever richer engagement with life’s diverse contexts and situations.” (Orrill, 2001, p. xviii) Numeracy

  3. “…the questions [are] more challenging, [and] require critical thinking. It gives you an opportunity to solve problems as a team and learn how to cooperate with each other. You will find yourself discovering new things while doing this task. [They] will help your group work skill, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills.” The Nature of Numeracy Tasks

  4. “…the questions [are] more challenging, [and] require critical thinking. It gives you an opportunity to solve problems as a team and learn how to cooperate with each other. You will find yourself discovering new things while doing this task. [They] will help your group work skill, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills.” The Nature of Numeracy Tasks

  5. “…the questions [are] more challenging, [and] require critical thinking. It gives you an opportunity to solve problems as a team and learn how to cooperate with each other. You will find yourself discovering new things while doing this task. [They] will help your group work skill, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills.” The Nature of Numeracy Tasks

  6. “…the questions [are] more challenging, [and] require critical thinking. It gives you an opportunity to solve problems as a team and learn how to cooperate with each other. You will find yourself discovering new things while doing this task. [They] will help your group work skill, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills.” The Nature of Numeracy Tasks

  7. “…the questions [are] more challenging, [and] require critical thinking. It gives you an opportunity to solve problems as a team and learn how to cooperate with each other. You will find yourself discovering new things while doing this task. [They] will help your group work skill, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills.” The Nature of Numeracy Tasks

  8. “…the questions [are] more challenging, [and] require critical thinking. It gives you an opportunity to solve problems as a team and learn how to cooperate with each other. You will find yourself discovering new things while doing this task. [They] will help your group work skill, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills.” The Nature of Numeracy Tasks

  9. “…the questions [are] more challenging, [and] require critical thinking. It gives you an opportunity to solve problems as a team and learn how to cooperate with each other. You will find yourself discovering new things while doing this task. [They] will help your group work skill, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills.” The Nature of Numeracy Tasks

  10. Grade 8 mathematics students (n = 30) • Mini School Program at a secondary school in Vancouver • In class observation, field notes, impromptu interviews, and survey • Grounded Theory Methods Methodology

  11. “The problems are meant to help develop the thinking involved. And to showcase that there are different ways and thinking to find an answer.” “We have to finish the questions by the end of the week and get a new one every week.” Classroom Norms(Yackel and Cobb)

  12. “The problems are meant to help develop the thinking involved. And to showcase that there are different ways and thinking to find an answer.” “We have to finish the questions by the end of the week and get a new one every week.” Classroom Norms(Yackel and Cobb)

  13. “The problems are meant to help develop the thinking involved. And to showcase that there are different ways and thinking to find an answer.” “We have to finish the questions by the end of the week and get a new one every week.” Classroom Norms(Yackel and Cobb)

  14. “The problems are meant to help develop the thinking involved. And to showcase that there are different ways and thinking to find an answer.” “We have to finish the questions by the end of the week and get a new one every week.” Classroom Norms(Yackel and Cobb)

  15. “[These are] odd questions that’s not often seen [in other math classes].” “… [Numeracy tasks] are often complicated and allow you to use your brain. Many other projects in class are basically revisits from what we’ve done … [The numeracy tasks and the projects] are on a complete different level.” Abnormal Norms

  16. “[These are] odd questions that’s not often seen [in other math classes].” “… [Numeracy tasks] are often complicated and allow you to use your brain. Many other projects in class are basically revisits from what we’ve done … [The numeracy tasks and the projects] are on a complete different level.” Abnormal Norms

  17. “[These are] odd questions that’s not often seen [in other math classes].” “… [Numeracy tasks] are often complicated and allow you to use your brain. Many other projects in class are basically revisits from what we’ve done … [The numeracy tasks and the projects] are on a complete different level.” Abnormal Norms

  18. Institutional norms “take the form of cultural theories, ideologies, and prescriptions about how society works or should work… institutionalized cultural rules define the meaning and identity of the individual and the patterns of appropriate economic, political, and cultural activity.” (Meyer et al., 1987, p. 9) Institutional Norms

  19. Students’ experiences are • Temporary • Unique • Limit students’ mathematics experiences • Regression to past experiences Institutional Norms

  20. What are some of the institutional norms in a secondary school setting (specifically in a mathematics classroom)? • How do institutional norms influence students and teachers in a secondary school setting? • Is it possible to normalize these ‘abnormal’ norms? How can this be done? Ongoing Research Questions

  21. Thank you!

  22. Contact UsMinnie Liuminniel@sfu.caPeter Liljedahlliljedahl@sfu.capeterliljedahl.com

  23. “Normative aspects of mathematical discussions that are specific to students’ mathematical activity.” (Yackel and Cobb, 1996) • Teachers’ endorsed norms, teachers’ and students’ enacted norms, students’ perceived norms (Levenson et al., 2009) Sociomathematical Norms