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Arabidopsis thaliana. Katie Dalpozzo. Model Organism. Small (20 cm),unremarkable spindly weed, with tiny, white, four-petalled flowers Six week lifespan No immediate agricultural importance and is not thought to cure any disease

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arabidopsis thaliana

Arabidopsis thaliana

Katie Dalpozzo

model organism
Model Organism
  • Small (20 cm),unremarkable spindly weed, with tiny, white, four-petalled flowers
  • Six week lifespan
  • No immediate agricultural importance and is not thought to cure any disease
  • Prolific seed production and easy cultivation in restricted space
  • A large number of mutant lines and genomic resources
genome
Genome
  • 5 chromosomes, 25, 498 genes, and 140 million bases
    • Smallest genome of any plant
  • First complete genome sequence of a plant
  • Useful plant-specific gene functions for crop enhancement
    • Grow crops in salty or metallic soils or in very cold or hot climates
sequence
Sequence
  • Sequenced by Arabidopsis Genome

Initiative (AGI)

Started in 1996, planned to finish by 2004, but actually finished in 2000

  • Current and future research done by The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR)
  • 8,811 articles on Arabidopsis