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Universal Design for Learning: A framework for good teaching, a model for student success. Craig Spooner, ACCESS Project Coordinator The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University. BIG Question #1. Who are your students?. Student Diversity. Ethnicity & Culture ESL/Native language

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universal design for learning a framework for good teaching a model for student success

Universal Design for Learning: A framework for good teaching, a model for student success

Craig Spooner,

ACCESS Project Coordinator

The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University

big question 1
BIG Question #1

Who are

your

students?

student diversity
Student Diversity
  • Ethnicity & Culture
  • ESL/Native language
  • Nontraditional
  • Gender
  • Learning Styles
  • Disabilities
ethnicity culture
Ethnicity & Culture*

*CSU Facts at a Glance, 2009-2010

esl native language
ESL / Native Language
  • Potential barriers to comprehension
    • For both students and instructors
    • Affects written and verbal communication
language quiz 1
Language Quiz 1

What is your good name, sir?

  • Full name
  • Last name
  • Nickname or pet name
language quiz 2
Language Quiz 2
  • I say there are 100 Crore stars in the sky. You say the stars number 10,000 Lakh.

Do we agree?

    • 1 lakh* = 100,000
    • 1 crore = 10,000,000
nontraditional students
Nontraditional Students

Percentage of undergraduates with nontraditional characteristics: 1992–93 and 1999–2000

nontraditional students1
Nontraditional Students
  • Highly motivated & Achievement oriented
    • Finances and family are two of the biggest concerns
    • Strong consumer orientation
    • Need flexible schedules
  • Integrate learning with life and work experiences
  • Prefer more active approaches to learning
  • Relatively independent
    • Lack of a cohort, “student life” experience
men women
Men & Women*

*CSU Facts at a Glance, 2009-2010

learning styles
Learning Styles
  • Visual
    • Visual-Linguistic (reading and writing)
    • Visual-Spatial (graphs and pictures)
  • Auditory (listening)
  • Kinesthetic (touching and moving)
disabilities
Disabilities
  • Both short-term and long-term, apparent and non-apparent
    • Mobility Impairments
    • Blindness/Visual Impairments
    • Deafness/Hearing Impairments
    • Learning Disabilities
    • Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD)
    • Autism Spectrum Disabilities
    • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
    • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
disabilities1
Disabilities
  • National statistics*
    • 11.3% of undergraduates report some type of disability
  • Colorado State University**
    • 8%–11% (ACCESS research, 2007-10)
    • Non-apparent disabilities are by far the largest proportion and growing
    • Even among students who say they have a disability, few seek accommodations

*National Center for Education Statistics, 2008; U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2009

**Schelly, Davies & Spooner, Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, in press.

big question 2
BIG Question #2

Who are

your

students?

How do you reach and engage diverse students?

universal design for learning
Universal Design for Learning

Universal Design for Learning (UDL)is a set of principles and techniques for creating inclusive classroom instruction and accessible course materials.

teaching

technology

history of udl
History of UDL
  • Universal Design (UD)
    • Accommodate the widest spectrum of users without the need for subsequent adaptation
    • Access to public buildings, city streets, television…
  • Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
    • Inclusive pedagogy
    • Applies to both teaching and technology
udl s 3 principles
UDL’s 3 Principles
  • Represent information and concepts in multiple ways (and in a variety of formats).
  • Students are given multiple ways to express their comprehension and mastery of a topic.
  • Students engage with new ideas and information in multiple ways.
1 representation
#1: Representation
  • Presenting ideas and information in multiple ways and in a variety of formats
    • Lectures
    • Group activities
    • Hands-on exercises
    • Text + Graphics, Audio, Video
    • Usable electronic formats (e.g., Word, PDF, HTML)
what makes a document universally designed
What makes a document Universally Designed?
  • Searchability
  • Copy and Paste
  • Bookmarks or an Interactive TOC
  • Text to Speech capability
  • Accessibility
a tale of two pdf documents
A Tale of Two PDF Documents

Scanned

OCR and Tags

udl tech tutorials
UDL Tech Tutorials
  • Microsoft Word
    • Styles and Headings
    • Images
  • PowerPoint
  • Adobe PDF
  • HTML
  • E-Text

http://accessproject.colostate.edu

2 expression
#2: Expression
  • Students expressing their comprehension in multiple ways
    • “Three P’s”: Projects, Performances, Presentations
    • Mini-writing assignments
    • Portfolios/Journals/Essays
    • Multimedia (text/graphics/audio/video)
3 engagement
#3: Engagement
  • Engaging students in multiple ways
    • Express your own enthusiasm!
    • Challenge students with meaningful, real-world assignments (e.g., service learning)
    • Give prompt and instructive feedback
    • Use classroom response systems (i>clickers)
    • Make yourself available to students during office hours in flexible formats
csu psychology undergraduates what helps you learn
CSU Psychology Undergraduates: What helps you learn?
  • Information presented in multiple formats
  • Instructor actively engages students in learning
  • Instructor relates key concepts to the larger objectives of the course
  • Instructor begins class with an outline
  • Instructor summarizes key points
  • Instructor highlights key points of instructional videos
csu psychology undergraduates what engages you
CSU Psychology Undergraduates: What engages you?
  • Strategies that increase engagement
    • i>clicker questions
    • Asks questions
    • Videos
    • Partner/group discussion and activities
    • In-class mini writing assignments
big question 3
BIG Question #3

Who are

your

students?

How do you reach and engage diverse students?

What are CSU’s

Goals?

goals of the university
Goals of the University
  • Access, Diversity, and Internationalization
  • Accessibility for students with physical, learning and other disabilities
  • Active and Experiential Learning Opportunities
  • Student Engagement Outcomes
  • Learning Outcomes (e.g., critical thinking)
  • Retention and Graduation
the access project
The ACCESS Project
  • Funded by U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education
    • Grant #P333A080026
  • Our Goal:
    • Ensuring that students with disabilities receive a quality higher education
  • Our Method:
    • Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
    • Student Self-Advocacy
published udl resources
Published UDL Resources

Burgstahler, S., & Cory, R. (2008). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

Rose, D., et al. (2006). Universal design for learning in postsecondary education: Reflections on principles and their application. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 19(2), 135-151.

Schelly, C. L., Davies, P. L., & Spooner, C. L. (in press). Student Perceptions of Faculty Implementation of Universal Design for Learning. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability.

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Thank you!Website: accessproject.colostate.eduCraig Spoonercraig.spooner@colostate.edu 970-491-0784

The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University

Funded by U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education

Grant #P333A080026