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A webinar series with Christian van Nieuwerburgh, Professor of Coaching and Positive Psychology

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  1. A webinar series with Christian van Nieuwerburgh, Professor of Coaching and Positive Psychology • ‘Context, Culture and Positive Psychology: • Reflecting on Advanced Practice’ 7th, 23rd, 30th June and 7th July 2017

  2. Webinar 2: • ‘Coaching in Professional Environments’ Christian van Nieuwerburgh 23rdJune 2017

  3. [alternative title to webinar] Executive Coaching:It’s all about the context @christianvn

  4. Our time together

  5. Your opinion Is coaching the same in every context?

  6. Exploring this topic • 17 chapters • 25 case studies • 42 contributors (van Nieuwerburgh 2016)

  7. The contexts • Financial services industry • Professional services firms • Local government sector • Healthcare sector • Schools and colleges • Higher education sector (van Nieuwerburgh 2016)

  8. Your experience of coaching in… • Financial services industry • Professional services firms • Local government sector • Healthcare sector • Schools and colleges • Higher education sector

  9. What emerged as consistent… • External coaches for senior leaders • Internal coaches for middle leaders • Growing interest in “coaching cultures” • Increasing recognition of importance of “soft skills” • Good quality training is important • Previous industry experience important to clients (van Nieuwerburgh 2016)

  10. What might have been different? What would you expect to emerge as different in the various professional contexts?

  11. What emerged as different… • The level of formality • Expectations about professionalism of coach • Attention given to Return on Investment/Expectation • Extent to which “general improvement” of practice is sufficient • Relative priority of wellbeing of staff • Level of commitment to coaching supervision for internal coaches (van Nieuwerburgh 2016)

  12. Your reflections How does this echo your own experiences or understanding? What comments or questions do you have?

  13. So what about “coaching cultures”?

  14. Defining “coaching cultures” “Coaching is the predominant style of managing and working together…where a commitment to grow the organisation is embedded in a parallel commitmentto grow the people in the organisation” (Clutterbuck & Megginson2005)

  15. Defining “coaching cultures” “A coaching culture exists in an organisation when a coaching approach is a key aspect of how the leaders, managers, and staff engage and develop all their people and engage their stakeholders” (Hawkins 2012)

  16. Defining “coaching cultures” “coaching cultures exist when a group of people embrace coaching as a way of making holistic improvements to individuals and the organisationthrough formal and informal coaching interactions” (Gormley& van Nieuwerburgh 2014)

  17. Time for reflection What would you need to experience at work to believe that you were part of a “coaching culture”?

  18. And what is the best way of creating a “coaching culture”?

  19. Three critical factors (Bersin et al. 2011)

  20. 7 stages of creating coaching cultures (Hawkins 2012)

  21. Creating coaching cultures • An organic, emergent approach that recognises the complexity of organisations and human beings? (van Nieuwerburgh & Passmore 2012)

  22. 1. What is the case for a coaching culture?

  23. 2. How can we transfer what is powerful?

  24. 3. What will be different when it is achieved?

  25. Some experiences from practice

  26. What about you?

  27. Towards a philosophy of coaching? • Relationships characterised by mutual respect • Encouragement of personal responsibility • Assumption that people can change their own futures An explicit and genuine intention to create the right conditions for people to flourish?

  28. A case study: Education (van Nieuwerburgh & Campbell 2015)

  29. Final thoughts… Positive side effect? Intended consequence?

  30. ANY QUESTIONS? • Webinar 2: • ‘Coaching in Professional Environments’ Christian van Nieuwerburgh 23rd June2017

  31. References • Bersin& Associates, LLC (2011). High impact performance management: Maximising performance coaching. Bersin Associates. • Clutterbuck, D. & Megginson, D. (2005). Making coaching work: Creating a coaching culture. London: CIPD. • Gormley, H., & van Nieuwerburgh, C. (2014). Developing coaching cultures: a review of the literature. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 7(1), 90-101. • Hawkins, P. (2012). Creating a coaching culture. Maidenhead: Open University Press. • van Nieuwerburgh, C. (ed.)(2016). Coaching in professional contexts. London: Sage. • van Nieuwerburgh, C. & Campbell, J. (2015). A global framework for coaching in education. CoachEd: The Teaching Leaders Coaching Journal, 1: 2-5. • van Nieuwerburgh, C. & Passmore, J. (2012). Creating coaching cultures for learning. In C. van Nieuwerburgh (Ed.), Coaching in education: Getting better results for students, educators, and parents. London: Karnac.pp. 153-172.

  32. THANK YOU! • Webinar 2: • ‘Coaching in Professional Environments’ Christian van Nieuwerburgh 23rd June2017