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LD/ADHD Initiative Executive Functions Modules. Session Three Strategy Sheets Elementary. Executive Functions Session 3 Strategy Sheet Elementary How Do I Develop Emotional Control Skills?. Definition: Emotional Control. Impact: Emotional Control.

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Ld adhd initiative executive functions modules

LD/ADHD Initiative Executive Functions Modules

Session Three

Strategy Sheets

Elementary


Executive functions session 3 strategy sheet elementary how do i develop emotional control skills
Executive Functions Session 3 Strategy Sheet ElementaryHow Do I Develop Emotional Control Skills?

Definition: Emotional Control

Impact: Emotional Control

Loses emotional control out of embarrassment, sadness, frustration or anger

Does not know how to cope when frustrated

Needs built-in breaks to keep under control

  • Modulates emotional responses

  • Handles frustration or difficult tasks

  • Can regulate the intensity of one’s emotions to match the intensity of the event

LD/ADHD Initiative

Department of Special Education and Student Services, HCPSS

What might this look like in your classroom?


Executive functions session 3 strategy sheet elementary how do i develop emotional control skills1
Executive Functions Session 3 Strategy Sheet ElementaryHow Do I Develop Emotional Control Skills?

Environmental Supports

Teaching Strategies

Use teachable moments to help students to recognize situations that trigger or early signs for emotional outbursts/feelings of frustration

Provide opportunities and ways to to discuss upcoming situations or events that may provoke an emotional reaction

Teach calming strategies and help students learn what coping mechanisms work best for them

Teach students to count to 10 before acting. Practice this by counting together aloud before making a decision.

Build independence by having students control their own emotions (taking a walk or giving themselves a time out) Practice strategies until they are internalized

Teach students a concrete, simple metaphor for measuring anger/other feelings (“thermometer” or “Speedometer”)

Make sure verbal and written directions are clear and given one at a time

Model “stopping” behavior or take a “time away” and verbalize strategies used to calm down and generate new ideas to help in future similar situations

Talk about situations that have led to emotional outbursts in a non-threatening setting and manner. Choose a situation when students are relaxed and therefore more receptive to discuss what happened.

  • Identify, reduce or eliminate triggers

  • Manage antecedents (situations, peers or tasks) that appear to produce emotional changes or outbursts Some situations, peers, or tasks may need to be avoided or limited until students experience more success

  • Post clear rules and expectations for behavior and predictability/consistency

  • Give student a script to follow

  • Remove student from problem situation

  • Use visual cues

  • Model effective strategies for emotional control i.e., take a deep breath

  • Provide external supports such as a safe place to go when upset/angry (coordinate with student services staff), as appropriate

LD/ADHD Initiative

Department of Special Education and Student Services, HCPSS

What might this look like in your classroom?


Executive functions session 3 strategy sheet elementary how do i develop working memory skills
Executive Functions Session 3 Strategy Sheet ElementaryHow Do I Develop Working Memory Skills?

Definition: Working Memory

Impact: Working Memory

Remembers only the first and last things in a series of directions

Forgets what they are doing in the middle of things or has trouble remembering things, even for a few minutes

Has difficulty retelling a story

Easily confused with multi-step math problems

  • Holding information in mind for the purpose of completing a specific and related task, recalling directions, retaining steps to a task, remembering routines

LD/ADHD Initiative

Department of Special Education and Student Services, HCPSS

What might this look like in your classroom?


Executive functions session 3 strategy sheet elementary how do i develop working memory skills1
Executive Functions Session 3 Strategy Sheet ElementaryHow Do I Develop Working Memory Skills?

Environmental Supports

Teaching Strategy

Use “warm-up” activities that trigger prior knowledge when introducing a new topic or switch topics

Generate options from memorizing and provide opportunities for students to choose which one works best for them

Practice verbal memory skills: rehearsal (whispering directions), chunking (whittle down two-step instructions to one), or mnemonic devices (“every good boy does fine” EGBDF to remember the spaces on a music staff)

Have students remember information in their minds from previous game experiences, rehearse strategies (talk to themselves) to navigate new steps, complete multi-step actions and keep in mind sequences and goals

Have students repeat or paraphrase what they have heard or understood to check for accuracy and provide an opportunity for rehearsal

Teach self-initiated “comprehension checking” strategies

  • Use visual memory aides: agenda books/calendars, notebooks, (to do lists), electronic devices and apps (i-pad, phone)

  • Provide a written checklist of steps required to complete a task

  • Use verbal reminders (e.g., from parent, teacher paraeducator, peer)

  • Use visual reminders: drawings, photographs, colorful pictures or graphic organizers for sequential tasks, word walls and posters

  • Encourage students to ask for help from others

  • Simplify or chunk directions

  • Create a safe environment

  • Use short, simple, direct instructions

  • Establish eye contact prior to giving essential instructions or new material

  • Emphasize that it is okay to ask the teacher to repeat instructions

  • Reduce distractions in the environment that can tax or disrupt working memory

LD/ADHD Initiative

Department of Special Education and Student Services, HCPSS

What might this look like in your classroom?