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Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science

Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science

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Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science

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  1. Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science NASA Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Joint Workshop April 28, 2008

  2. Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science • Breakout session organization • Introduction • “Breakout Plenary” Talks (5 min each) • 0) Fred Huemmrich - DESDynI Field Campaigns • 1) Paula Coble – GOM Workshop summary; • 2) Carlos DelCastillo - Southern Ocean GasEx • 3) Eric Davidson - LBA • “Breakout Breakouts” (30-40 min) • Final Breakout Plenary (15-20 min) with summary from each breakout breakout

  3. Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science • There are a number of reasons for focused field campaigns • It is a successful approach to getting multidisciplinary research done to answer "tough" research questions • They can produce significant leaps forward in the science • Stimulates new model development, creating direct ties between modelers and data providers • Economies of scale, logistics, infrastructure, data systems • Longer term reasons include • Creating community, developing connections between different disciplines • Can form international ties • - Two-way exchange of science and technology between host country and US • Trains students • Develops multidisciplinary data sets that can be used in future research

  4. Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science • 1) Historically, it has been difficult to develop meaningful interactions between terrestrial and ocean carbon cycle and ecosystem studies • a. There have been a number of successful large field studies in the past (FIFE, BOREAS, LBA, JGOFS, GLOBEC, WOCE, GEOTRACES) • b. Generally conducted without land-ocean perspective, but NACP is an exception • 2) However, land-ocean margins represent key areas where new insights regarding the carbon cycle may be gained by coordinated study; • a. Continental carbon budgets fail to account for a missing carbon term that may be transported through the coastal margin with uncertain magnitude and fate • b. Changes in land ecosystem properties and land use/development may lead to changes in the export of carbon and other materials to the coastal ocean; • c. Rise in sea level will profoundly alter coastal margins and may impact the associated processing and fluxes of carbon through the coastal margin; • d. Coastal margins influence boundary conditions for continental atmospheric carbon budgets, yet their influence on atmospheric carbon is poorly understood;

  5. Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science • 3) Is their justification for a coordinated terrestrial-ocean carbon study? • a. How should field program and campaigns be designed to address this? • b. What would be the key satellite missions (e.g., GEO-CAPE, OCO) and associated data records that would support such a study? • i. Pre-launch preparations • ii. Post-launch cal/val efforts • c. How could airborne measurements play a role in such a study? • i. Lidar/Hyperspectral • ii. Radiometry • iii. Airborne flux measurements • iv. Etc.

  6. Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science • Charge to “Breakout Breakouts” • Core questions: • a. What does the carbon cycle and ecosystems community expect of this effort? • b. What are our biggest challenges in this area, and how do we address them? • c. Is our list of identified data records complete, or is something missing? • d. Does the carbon cycle and ecosystems community need to establish priorities for these and other activities, and, if so, how should they be established?

  7. Veg 3D Field Campaign

  8. DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice) A mission using InSAR and LIDAR to study hazards and global environmental change. Mission objectives: • Determine the likelihood of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and landslides. • Predict the response of ice sheets to climate change and impact on the sea level. • Characterize the effects of changing climate and land use on species habitats and carbon budget.

  9. DESDynI Field Campaign Objectives • Acquire data sets necessary to evolve the existing RADAR & LIDAR capability to map global 3-dimensional vegetation structure and biomass. • To mature the algorithms required to meet DESDynI vegetation 3-D objectives. • Develop datasets that could also support enhanced span of topics for future TE investigations.

  10. Possible Field Campaign Sites Sierras, California Northeast Appalachians Katrina, Louisiana La Selva, Costa Rica

  11. Proposed 2008 Experiments • ‘08 West Coast Swing - UAVSAR, ALOS/PALSAR • Sierra Nevada (SN) • Additional Ground Data Collection • Design new plots • Revisit existing ground plots • Visit Landsat Data Cube Chronosequence • UAVSAR overflight in September • Utilize ‘06 LVIS data • ‘08 East Coast Swing LVIS - ALOS/PALSAR • Northeast • Re-fly 1999, 2003 LVIS sites (5yr, 9yr revisit interval) • Howland, Hubbard Brook, Bartlett, Harvard Forest, GSFC • Appalachians • Fly high biomass sites (e.g. Coweeta LTER) • Gulf Coast • Fly high biomass sites • Need candidate • Fly Katrina disturbed sites • 20 existing inventories plots, pre and post Katrina • Acquire ALOS/PALSAR data

  12. Proposed 2009 Experiments • ‘09 West Coast Swing LVIS • Sierra Nevada (SN) • Additional Ground Data Collection • Revisit SN ground plots • Visit Landsat Data Cube Chronosequence • LVIS 3 yr revisit • ‘09 East Coast Swing -UAVSAR • Northeast • Fly UAVSAR • Howland, Hubbard Brook, Bartlett, Harvard Forest • Gulf Coast • Fly high biomass sites • Fly site covered in ‘08 by LVIS • Fly Katrina sites covered in ‘08 by LVIS • 20 existing inventories plots, pre and post Katrina • Continue PALSAR acquisition

  13. Field Programs, Campaigns, Airborne Science • Charge to “Breakout Breakouts” • Core questions: • a. What does the carbon cycle and ecosystems community expect of this effort? • b. What are our biggest challenges in this area, and how do we address them? • c. Is our list of identified data records complete, or is something missing? • d. Does the carbon cycle and ecosystems community need to establish priorities for these and other activities, and, if so, how should they be established?