Columbia River Treaty Review British Columbia Perspective Northwest Hydroelectric Association - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Columbia River Treaty Review British Columbia Perspective Northwest Hydroelectric Association

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Columbia River Treaty Review British Columbia Perspective Northwest Hydroelectric Association 2013 Annual Conference Portland, Oregon February 20, 2013 Kathy Eichenberger Executive Director, Columbia River Treaty Review BC Ministry of Energy, Mines and Natural Gas

  2. Overview of BC Treaty Review Process • Builds on domestic Water Use Planning • CRT review comprehensive and inclusive • Examines a broad range of values • Public consultation • First Nations consultation • Federal, provincial and local government committees

  3. Community displacement and sustainability • Air quality • Aboriginal cultural sites • Ecosystems, fish and wildlife • Agriculture, forestry, transportation • Tourism and recreation Initial and ongoing impacts Very top of mind

  4. BC Perspective on Flood Control • Called Upon is a step backward • Difference in views between Entities • Transfer of risk from BC to US • US Effective Use - may not need to call upon Canada below 600 kcfs at The Dalles • Energy loss at small facilities in high water years: 1300-3000 GWh ($40-150M)

  5. BC Perspective on Ecosystem Management • Changes in operations to address ecosystem values over the last 15 years • Proportional drafting during low flows • Flow augmentation for fish • Dry year strategy • Adaptation to climate change

  6. BC Perspective on Sharing Downstream Benefits • Original benefits have expanded to other values • BC should not have to pay for US choices on use of flows • Value of Canadian Entitlement has diminished and will decrease over time • Ongoing costs associated with Treaty dams

  7. BC Perspective on Future of the Treaty • Founding principles of the Treaty recognized internationally – creating and sharing benefits • Treaty can be amended upon agreement by both parties – creating a new treaty is not likely feasible • Transboundary water system cannot be managed efficiently by a series of commercial agreements • If Treaty terminated BC motivated to change operations for new power, other values

  8. Questions?