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Clinical Conferences as an Evaluation Method

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  1. Clinical Conferences as an Evaluation Method Margaret Delks BSN, RN, BC NUGR 550 Dr. May November, 2011

  2. Food for Thought… • What is your experience with Clinical Conferences? • When and where do you feel Clinical Conferences are best utilized? • Unit setting? Clinical student debriefing? • What do you feel are advantages/disadvantages of Clinical Conferences?

  3. Educator Challenges • Emphasis of educational activities • Meet facility needs and goals • Enhance patient outcomes • Facilitate excellence in nursing practice • Maintain cost efficiency • Provide support and validation for programs

  4. Clinical Conferences • Shared information about a patient case, clinical scenario, clinical issue, clinical practice • Usually via presentation in a group format • Discussion among group members facilitated by a leader • Captures domains of learning- cognitive, psychomotor, affective • Support adult learning theory/principles • Learner focus is desired

  5. Clinical Conferences • Conference Types • Student presented clinical practice issue or case study • Student competency evaluated on presentation and facilitation of group • Educator presented clinical issue case study • Student competency evaluated on participation and subsequent performance/testing • Pre and Post conferences traditionally used in nursing • Nursing school • Orientation

  6. Criteria for Evaluation • Clinical Reasoning- strength of the clinical conference • Process of discussion and conclusions • Knowledge level- • presentation delivery • questioning and answers- testing/quiz • development of plan of care • Communication skills-excellent method of evaluation • Level and quality of communication • Verbal, non-verbal, written, technology • Learner participation

  7. Criteria for Evaluation • Attitude- open forum for feedback will reveal • Direct observation of discussion/results • Written evaluation • Use of rubric • Choices of topic/subject matter • Formative- evaluation during course or module (better) • Summative- final presentation (difficult for poor speakers)

  8. Criteria for Evaluation • Validity- Clarity around expectations • Rubrics, objectives- what you want the learner to do • Reliability- Much variability • Learner dependent • Nurses differ based on experience, ethics, world view

  9. Criteria for Evaluation • Educational Effect- Preparation and participation may influence • Feasibility- not only feasible- recommended method • Practicality- very practical and relevant • Efficiency- in the clinical setting with practice topics • Acceptability- can be disparity between educator and learners • Generalizability- Wide variability, not best method

  10. Conclusion • Clinical conferences good choice to evaluate many criteria • Cognitive, affective domains • Knowledge level, communication skills, attitude • Best for formative but can use for summative • Feasibility, practicality, efficiency and acceptability • May not be best choice for psychomotor domain, validity and reliability, educational effect and generalizability

  11. Conclusion • Supports adult learning theory • Need clear objectives, expectations and desired outcomes • Use rubrics or other evaluation tools • Best for clinical topics • Strong for flexibility and adaptability

  12. References • Anderson, L. W., Krathwohl, D. R., & Bloom, B. S. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. New York, NY: Longman. • Billings, D. M., & Halstead, J. A. (2009). Teaching in nursing a guide for faculty (3rd ed.). St. Louis, MO.: Saunders Elsevier. • Gaberson, K. B., & Oermann, M. H. (2010). Clinical teaching strategies in nursing (3rd ed.). New York, NY.: Springer. • Holmboe, E. S., & Hawkins, R. E. (2008). Practical guide to the evaluation of clinical competence. Philadelphia PA.: Mosby Elsevier. • Hsu, L. L. (2007). Conducting clinical post-conference in clinical teaching: a qualitative study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 15251533. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01751.x • Knowles, M. S., Holton, E. F., II, & Swanson, R. A. (2005). The adult learner the definitive classic in adult education and human resource development (6th ed.). Burlington, MA: Elsevier. • Polit, D. E., & Beck, C. T. (2008). Nursing research generating and assessing evidence for nursing practice (8th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. • Yehle, K. S., & Royal, P. A. (2010, July/August). Changing the post clinical conference: new time, new place, new methods, equal success. Nursing Education Perspectives, 31(4), 256-258. Retrieved from www.EBSCOhost.com