Bicycle Facility Design - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

bicycle facility design n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Bicycle Facility Design PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Bicycle Facility Design

play fullscreen
1 / 60
Bicycle Facility Design
146 Views
Download Presentation
dewey
Download Presentation

Bicycle Facility Design

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Bicycle Facility Design

  2. Design Cyclist • Novice • Children • Varying levels of ability and judgment • Speeds + lack of judgment Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  3. Design Cyclist • Recreational or occasional user Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  4. Expert Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  5. Designing bicycle facilities: Policies and Standards • Federal/National: • U.S. Access Board: Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines • FHWA: Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) • AASHTO: Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities • State and Local Manuals • Example: Oregon DOT Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  6. Types of Bicycle Facilities

  7. Paved Shoulders

  8. Paved Shoulders • any additional width is better than none • If < 4 feet, cannot designate or mark as bicycle lane • Minimum 4 feet width to be marked as bicycle facility • Must be usable Bike Lane Design Guide and www.bicylinginfo.org

  9. Paved Shoulders • > = 5 feet with guardrail, curb, or other barrier • Increase with higher bicycle usage or higher vehicle Bike Lane Design Guide and www.bicylinginfo.org

  10. Wide Lanes

  11. Wide Vehicle Travel Lanes • bicycle lane is best but wide travel lane is better than nothing • Allows motorist to safely pass cyclists while remaining in the same lane • 14 feet recommended for outside lane measured from edge line or joint of gutter pan to lane line

  12. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  13. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  14. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  15. Wide Vehicle Travel Lanes • 15 feet preferred when extra space to maneuver is required • Steep slope • On-street parking Image source: King et al, 2002

  16. Wide Vehicle Travel Lanes • 15 feet preferred when extra space to maneuver is required • Steep slope • On-street parking • Avoid lanes that are too wide, vehicles treat as two lanes • Consider creating separate bike lane

  17. Bike Lanes

  18. Bike Lanes • Portion of roadway designated by striping, signing, and pavement marking for preferential or exclusive use by bicyclists King et al, 2002

  19. Bike Lanes • 4 feet minimum with no curb and gutter • 5 feet min. adjacent to parking, next to gutter, or guardrail • 11 feet shared bike lane and parking area with no curb face • 12 feet shared bike lane and parking area with curb face

  20. King et al, 2002

  21. King et al, 2002

  22. Bike Lanes • Lane stripe • 6 inch solid white separates from vehicle lane • 4 inch optional to separate from parking spaces

  23. Bike Lane • Use only by bicyclists • Bicyclists are expected to make left turn from left turn lane and not bike lane • Why not sidewalks • Motorists are not looking for fast moving vehicles on sidewalk • Have same rights as motorist • Conflicts with pedestrian • ??? Bike Lane Design Guide. 2002.

  24. King et al, 2002

  25. King et al, 2002

  26. King et al, 2002

  27. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  28. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  29. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  30. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  31. Intersections

  32. Intersections • The recommended designs are based on the assumption that: • motorists making right turns should make their turn from as close to the right-hand curb as practicable • bicyclists going straight ahead should be to the left of right turning traffic • bicyclists turning left should turn from a left turn lane or left side lane Bike lane design guide, 2002

  33. Bike lane at uncontrolled intersection: bike lane stripes should not be extended through a pedestrian crosswalk or any street intersection (with the exception of dashed lines through some complex intersections)Bike lane at controlled intersection: bike lane stripe ends at stop line or crosswalk with right turning traffic bike lane dashed for final 50ft-200ft (15m-60m) with bus stop bike lane dashed for length of bus stop • Bike lane at intersection w/right turn lane: see diagram (on p. 29 of the AASHTO Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities, 3rd Edition) www.bicylinginfo.org

  34. Bike lane at intersection w/left turn lane: optional bike lane stripe to right of left turning vehiclesBike lane at modern roundabout: discontinue lane 35-65 feet (10m-20m) prior to low speed roundaboutBike lane at multi-lane roundabout: discontinue lane prior to roundabout; consider separated bikeway, shared use of sidewalks, grade separation or re-routing (none are especially good options)Bike lane at high speed interchange: see diagram (on p. 63 of the AASHTO Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities, 3rd Edition) www.bicylinginfo.org

  35. Bike lane design guide, 2002

  36. Bike lane design guide, 2002

  37. Bike lane design guide, 2002

  38. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  39. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  40. Other Barriers and Roadway Hazards Affecting Bicyclists

  41. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  42. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  43. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  44. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  45. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  46. Other Program and Facilities that Benefit Bicyclists

  47. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  48. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  49. Shared Use Path Design(also termed Multi-Use Trails and Bike Paths) Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

  50. Image source: FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation