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Section 508 Procurement Training
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  1. Section 508 Procurement Training California State University Accessible Technology Initiative (ATI) - S508PT Day One Beginner Track 1:00 – 2:30 Workshop IT and people with disabilities, Assistive technologies Section 508 legal framework. Jon Brundage, presenter may not be reproduced without permission

  2. Topics • Overview of disabilities (vision, hearing/speech, mobility, cognitive) • What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • Assistive technologies relationship to Section 508 requirements. • Section 508 legal background and how the standards are enforced. may not be reproduced without permission

  3. Overview of disabilities (vision, hearing/speech, mobility, cognitive) • Section 508 addresses various disabilities. There are overlapping areas on concern that affect various requirements in the standards. • For example, keyboard access is a consideration in both software and web standards. may not be reproduced without permission

  4. Vision • When we think of visual disabilities, what comes to mind immediately is blindness (usually defined as a condition in which the best corrected visual acuity is 20/200, or less, or the person's visual field is 20 degrees or less). • While a great deal of accessibility efforts are centered on blindness, there are other vision issues that are considered in the standards. may not be reproduced without permission

  5. Vision • In addition to blindness, other visual disabilities include: • low vision • color blindness • other conditions such as strabismus, tunnel vision, glaucoma may not be reproduced without permission

  6. Vision-some concepts • Linearization • Visual users mayscan content in any order they wish. • Screen reader users have some limitations to overcome. may not be reproduced without permission

  7. Vision-some concepts may not be reproduced without permission

  8. Vision-some concepts may not be reproduced without permission

  9. Vision-some concepts • Context and focus • Visual users have an easier time of maintaining context (via visual association) and understanding the current focus. may not be reproduced without permission

  10. Vision-some concepts Data table may not be reproduced without permission

  11. Vision-some concepts Data table- visual intersection may not be reproduced without permission

  12. Vision-some concepts “straw view” may not be reproduced without permission

  13. Hearing/Speech • Deaf • Hard of Hearing • Difficulty with speech may not be reproduced without permission

  14. Mobility • Muscle control (Parkinson's, Multiple Sclerosis, injury) • Paralysis • Arthritis may not be reproduced without permission

  15. Cognitive • Also referred to as Developmental Disabilities • Dyslexia (difficulty with written language) • Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) • Not included in current standards, under consideration for update to 508 may not be reproduced without permission

  16. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • “Assistive technologies” is a generic term that includes Assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices may not be reproduced without permission

  17. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • Screen readers • attempts to identify and interpret what is being displayed on the screen • output to Braille or sound • sometime used by persons with developmental disabilities may not be reproduced without permission

  18. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • Popular screen readers • JAWS (“Job Access With Speech”) from Freedom Scientific • Window Eyes from GW Micro • HAL from Dolphin Computer Access may not be reproduced without permission

  19. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • Screen Magnifiers • low vision aid may not be reproduced without permission

  20. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • TTY (“telephone typewriter” or “teletypewriter”) • used when one of the parties has speech or hearing difficulties may not be reproduced without permission

  21. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • Captioning • Aid for hearing impaired • Also helps those with comprehension problems • “closed” means that the captions are displayed at the option of the viewer • “open” refers to captions that can’t be turned off or hidden may not be reproduced without permission

  22. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • Browser settings • Ability to control font appearance. • Custom style sheets • Disable JavaScript may not be reproduced without permission

  23. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • Operating system settings and built in accessories • High contrast settings. • Magnifier • On Screen Keyboard may not be reproduced without permission

  24. What Assistive technologies are and how they aid persons with disabilities. • And..... • the keyboard may not be reproduced without permission

  25. Assistive technologies relationship to Section 508 requirements. • The requirements are based in part by how Assistive technologies interact with Information technology. may not be reproduced without permission

  26. Assistive technologies relationship to Section 508 requirements. • Some examples: • Screen readers can help users understand content in HTML data tables- hence Paragraph G in 1194.22 (Web) • Hearing aid compatibility (“HAC”) allows for listening to a signal via a magnetic signal- Paragraph H in 1194.23 (Telecommunications) may not be reproduced without permission

  27. Assistive technologies relationship to Section 508 requirements. • a few more examples: • “Executable from the keyboard” Paragraph A in 1194.21(Software Applications and Operating Systems) • Captioning decoder requirements- Paragraph A in 1194.24 (Video and Multimedia Products) may not be reproduced without permission

  28. Legal background • Current laws regarding accessibility have their roots in laws passed over the years: • Section 504 of the U.S. Rehabilitation Act of 1973 • Establishes that disability rights are a form of civil rights and therefore covered by the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution (Citizens rights). • Mandates that institutions receiving federal funds provide equal access to their programs. • Uses total institutional budget (not just the computing area's budget) in measuring the "reasonableness" of required accommodations for accessibility. may not be reproduced without permission

  29. Legal background, cont • The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 • Wide-ranging legislation intended to make American society more accessible to people with disabilities. • Extends the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 to all public and commercial facilities, with few exceptions, not just those that receive federal funding. • Requires that every institution receiving federal funds establish and maintain a plan of compliance. may not be reproduced without permission

  30. Legal background, cont. • 1998, Congress amended the U.S. Rehabilitation Act of 1973 with Section 508 • Requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members of the public seeking information or services from a federal agency, have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to that provided to the public who are not individuals with disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency.  • Also is intended to ensure that Federal Employees with disabilities have equal access to information technology (IT) in the workplace. may not be reproduced without permission

  31. Legal background, cont. • The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) published accessibility standards for compliance with Section 508 on Dec. 21, 2000. The enforcement date of the standards was June 21, 2001. may not be reproduced without permission

  32. Enforcement • 508 set up an administrative process under which individuals with disabilities can file a complaint alleging that a Federal agency has not complied with the standards. This process uses the same complaint procedures established under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (which covers access to Federally funded programs and services). Individuals may also file a civil action against an agency to seek injunctive relief and attorney's fees (but not compensatory or punitive damages). may not be reproduced without permission

  33. Enforcement • Department of Justice has an active role. • http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/ • Publications on ADA • FAQs • How to file complaints may not be reproduced without permission

  34. Enforcement • Self enforcement. • Section 508 coordinators for each agency. • Training programs. • Self-evaluation. may not be reproduced without permission

  35. Questions/discussion Thank You! Jon Brundage jon@jonbrundageassoc.com www.jonbrundageassoc.com/CSU08/ may not be reproduced without permission