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Energy Reduction Seafood Processing Sector. Sponsored by: Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture Feb 22-24 2010. Workshop Agenda. Workshop introduction Why is energy reduction important? Energy reduction audit results Handbook and CD use

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Energy Reduction Seafood Processing Sector


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    1. Energy Reduction Seafood Processing Sector Sponsored by: Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture Feb 22-24 2010 Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    2. Workshop Agenda • Workshop introduction • Why is energy reduction important? • Energy reduction audit results • Handbook and CD use • Energy reduction projects • Question period Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    3. Workshop Introduction • Energy audit project • Energy reduction handbook and CD • Fisheries technology and new opportunities program • Role the Provincial Government can play in energy reduction Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    4. Session 1: Energy Reduction • Save money – 10%-15% of costs • Increase competitiveness • Improve corporate ecological image Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    5. Develop an energy master plan. • Inform employees. • Establish an energy management committee. • Complete an energy audit. • Evaluate projects. • Implement projects. • Monitor results. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    6. Start saving money NOW ! • Shutoff equipment and lights when not in use. • Shutoff water lines, and disconnect unused steam and water lines. • Operate refrigeration at optimum temperature. • Operate heated water systems at lowest possible temperature. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    7. Be better than the competition. • Produce at a lower cost. • Maintain markets when prices decrease. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    8. Improve ecological image. • Promote your energy savings strategy. • Access the growing ‘green’ market. • Make information about carbon footprint available to buyers. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    9. Session 2: Project Results • Reports on five physical plants • Production of handbook • Provided ‘Payback’ calculation CD • Delivering a series of workshops Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    10. What type of energy is consumed? Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    11. What are energy cost by species? Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    12. Where is electricity consumed? Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    13. Refrigeration cost breakdown. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    14. Electrical demand charges. • Comprise 25% of total electric bill. • Based on largest kW load for the month. • Demand charge can be reduced 10%-15%. • Improve load factors. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    15. Boiler fuel cost breakdown. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    16. Plant heating. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    17. Alternative energy sources. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    18. Project ranking. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    19. Session 3: Handbook and CD • Review handbook contents. • Introduce payback analysis models on the CD. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    20. The energy plan should ………. • Measure energy consumption. • Change employee mindsets. • Upgrade equipment. • Adopt new technology. • Rethink facility design. • Evaluate alternative energy sources. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    21. Rates increase each year. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    22. Where are prices going? UP! Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    23. What do the paybacks mean? Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    24. Refrigeration operating practises. • Operating practises should be developed. • Practises should be documented and provided to engineers. • Compliance to practises should be monitored. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    25. Refrigeration design improvements. • Capital must be available. • Rank projects by payback. • Do projects with highest payback first. • Monitor to ensure improvements are realized. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    26. Boiler losses can be up to 30%! • Efficiency 75%-85% • Some as low as 70% • Losses (15%-30%): • Flue 12%-22% • Blowdown 2%-4% • Rad./Conv. 1%-4% Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    27. Can biomass boilers save $? • Good • Lower fuel price • Stable prices • 87% lower emissions • Bad • Higher capital cost • Bigger footprint • Ash disposal cost Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    28. Central steam cookers Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    29. Electric forklifts? Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    30. Plant operating practises. • Shut down equipment immediately at breaks. • Turn off water when not in use. • Install rapid close rubber doors at entrances. • Maintain refrigerated doors to eliminate leaks. • Reduce heating on down days and off season. • Use motion sensing lights outdoors and in rooms rarely occupied. • Switch off power bars to all office equipment. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    31. Other handbook information. • Electrical monitoring equipment. • Plant lighting – target levels and light types. • Peak load shaving. • Plant heating fuel consumption. • Alternative energy sources. • Calculating a products carbon footprint. • Links to conservation and funding websites. Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    32. CD Demo Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    33. Session 4: Energy Reduction Projects • Boilers • Refrigeration • Motors • Pumps and fans Pisces Consulting Limited - pisces@ns.sympatico.ca

    34. Boiler Stack Economizer Installation

    35. Boiler Stack Economizer Installation - Example • Cleaver Brooks, 350 Horsepower Steam Boiler, • 100 psig operating pressure • Stack Economizer installed cost $30,000

    36. Change Refrigeration System Operating Conditions - Freezing • Operate at suction temperatures only as low as necessary • Common suction temperatures in NL range from -40˚F (-40˚C) to -45˚F (43˚C ) • Because of specific volume differences in refrigerants such as ammonia, the compressor capacity is 20% higher when operating at -35˚F (-37˚C) as compared to -42˚F (-41˚C) . The specific volume of ammonia at -42˚F (-41˚C) is 1.64 m3/kg and at -35˚F (-37 ˚C) it’s 1.35 m3/kg • Refrigeration compressors are most efficient at 100% load

    37. Refrigeration System Compressor Example 1 Example 2 • Suction Temperature: -42˚F (-41.1˚C) • Condensing Temperature: 95˚F (35˚C) • Not Economized • Speed: 3550 rpm • 100% Load • Capacity: 120.9 TR (425.2 kW) • Absorbed Power: 441.6 HP (329.3 kW) • HP/TR ratio: 3.65:1.0 • Suction Temperature: -42˚F (-41.1˚C) • Condensing Temperature: 95˚F (35˚C) • Economized • Speed: 3550 rpm • 100% Load • Capacity: 149.9 TR (527.4 kW) • Absorbed Power: 471.7 HP (351.8 kW) • HP/TR ratio: 3.14:1.0

    38. Refrigeration System Compressor Example 3 Example 4 • Suction Temperature: -35˚F (-37˚C) • Condensing Temperature: 85˚F (29.4˚C) • Not Economized • Speed: 3550 rpm • 100% Load • Capacity: 158.9 TR (558.8 kW) • Absorbed Power: 415.7 Hp (310.0 kW) • HP/TR ratio: 2.61:1.0 • Suction Temperature: -35˚F (-37˚C) • Condensing Temperature: 85˚F (29.4˚C) • Economized • Speed: 3550 rpm • 100% Load • Capacity: 190.1 TR (668.5 kW) • Absorbed Power: 444.6 Hp (331.5 kW) • HP/TR ratio: 2.33:1.0

    39. Example 5 Example 6 • Suction Temperature: -42˚F (-41.1˚C) • Condensing Temperature: 95˚F (35˚C) • Economized • Speed: 3550 rpm • 50% Load • Capacity: 60.5 TR (212.8 kW) • Absorbed Power: 355.2Hp (264.9 kW) • HP/TR ratio: 5.87:1.0 • Suction Temperature: -35˚F (-37.2˚C) • Condensing Temperature: 85˚F (29.4˚C) • Economized • Speed: 3550 rpm • 50% Load • Capacity: 76.1 TR (267.6 kW) • Absorbed Power: 322.8 Hp (240.7 kW) • HP/TR ratio: 4.24:1.0 • Suction Temperature: -35˚F (-37.2˚C) • Condensing Temperature: 85˚F (29.4˚C) • Economized • Speed: 1750 rpm • 100% Load • Capacity: 83.7 TR (294.2 kW) • Absorbed Power: 214.8 Hp (160.2 kW) • HP/TR ratio: 2.56:1.0 Example 7

    40. Change Refrigeration System Operating Conditions – Water Chilling • Mycom 200VS • Condensing temperature: 85˚F (29.4˚C)

    41. Refrigeration System Operation – Energy Savings • As an example of the energy savings possible in a typical fish processing plant with 300 TR low temperature (freezing/ice making load) and 300 TR medium temperature (water chilling load), lets looks at the energy cost difference possible by simply changing operating temperatures. We can see from the previous compressor capacities slides that there is a significant difference in the HP/TR ratio depending upon operating conditions. At -42˚F/95˚F not economized the HP/TR ratio is 3.65:1.Whereas at -35˚F/85˚F economized the HP/TR ratio is 2.34:1. At 0˚F /85˚F the HP/TR ratio is 1.47:1 and at 25˚F/85˚F the HP/TR ratio is 0.86:1

    42. Based upon this, the energy savings possible, based upon a 4000 hour operating year is: 300TR x (3.65 – 2.34) x 0.746 x 4000 hrs x $0.089/kWh = $104,371.37 300TR x (1.47 – 0.86) x 0.746 x 4000 hrs x $0.089/kWh = $48,600.41 Savings = $104,371.37 + $48,600.41 = $152,971.78

    43. Reducing refrigeration system compressor horsepower by 400 hp based upon 24/7 operation at100% load for 6 months would result in significant energy savings. Based upon a 300 TR freezing load operating at -42˚F/95˚F, not economized with a HP/TR factor of 3.65, HP = 300 x 3.65 = 1095 hp. As opposed to operating at -35˚F/85˚F, economized with a HP/TR factor of 2.33, HP = 300 x 2.33 = 699 hp Savings = 400 hp x 0.746 x 4000 hrs x $0.089 per kWh = $106,230.4

    44. Premium Efficiency Motors vs. Standard Efficiency Motors • Energy represents more than 97% of total motor costs over a motor’s lifetime, the initial purchase price and maintenance cost making up the remaining 3% • When purchasing a new motor or rewinding an old, the motor purchase/repair cost is often the determining factor, not the cost of the energy the motor will consume over its lifetime.

    45. Electric Motor Operating Cost Calculation • Demand Savings (kW) = (hp x 0.746) x (LF) x (1/Eexisting – 1/Ereplace) • Consumption Savings (kWh) = (Demand Savings) x (Operating Hours) • Annual Cost Savings = (kWh savings x kWh rate) hp = motor nameplate horsepower 0.746 = conversion from hp to kW LF = load factor as percent of full-rated load Eexisting and Ereplace= efficiency of existing and replacement motors (in percent)

    46. Electric Motor Energy Cost Savings Example; Premium vs. Standard Efficiency • A shrimp plant is using a standard 100 hp motor. The plant is in operation 7 months of the year and the motor is operating 24/7 at 100% load. How much energy and money would be saved if the motor was a premium efficiency motor instead of a standard efficiency motor?

    47. Demand Savings = (100 hp x 0.746) x (1.0) x (1/0.923 – 1/0.954) • = 2.62 kW • Consumption Savings = (2.62 kW x 5000 hours) • = 13 100 kWh • Annual Cost Savings = 13 131.68 kWh x $0.089 per kWh • = $1165.9

    48. Motor Power Factor/Load