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The Pyramid Framework within Early Intervention Programs: . Promoting the Social Development of Infants and Toddlers. What we hope to accomplish in this webinar. Provide rationale for Teaching Pyramid

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the pyramid framework within early intervention programs

The Pyramid Framework within Early Intervention Programs: 

Promoting the Social Development of Infants and Toddlers

what we hope to accomplish in this webinar
What we hope to accomplish in this webinar
  • Provide rationale for Teaching Pyramid
  • Explain why the Teaching Pyramid is a useful model for thinking about social emotional development of infants and toddlers.
  • Examine some of the key features of model as applied to very young children and their families.
  • Talk about some of the promise and the challenges of such an approach.
the teaching pyramid promoting social and emotional competence and addressing challenging behavior
The Teaching Pyramid: Promoting Social and Emotional Competence and Addressing Challenging Behavior

Treatment/Focused Intervention

Intensive Interventions

Individualized Intervention

Focus on Caregiver-Child

Interaction

Prevention

High Quality Supportive Environments

Universal Promotion

Nurturing and Responsive Relationships

key ideas underlying multi tiered models
Key Ideas Underlying Multi-Tiered Models
  • Pyramid provides a tiered intervention framework of evidence-based intervention for promoting the social, emotional and behavioral development of young children.
  • Model describes 3 tiers of intervention practice:
    • Universal promotion for all children.
    • Secondary prevention to address the needs of children at risk for social-emotional challenges.
    • Intensive or tertiary intervention for children with persistent challenges.
strong foundation is important in all multi tiered systems of support
Strong foundation is important in all multi-tiered systems of support.
  • Foundation: If this is in place, most children won’t need more intensive interventions.
  • In Teaching Pyramid, Foundation is:
    • Nurturing and Responsive Relationships
    • High quality Environments
slide6
CSEFEL Pyramid Model:

Promoting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children

Intensive

Intervention

Systematic approaches have preventive and remedial

effects on social emotional develop-

ment.

Targeted Social

Emotional Supports

 • Supportive, responsive relationships among adults and children are necessary for promoting social emotional development • High quality environments promote positive outcomes for all young children

Nurturing and

Responsive Relationships

AND

High Quality Environments

the teaching pyramid key ingredients for supporting social emotional development
The Teaching Pyramid – Key Ingredients for Supporting Social Emotional Development
  • Focus on promotion and prevention rather then reactive procedures
    • Positive interactions
    • Consistency and predictability in the classroom routine
    • Clearly defined expectations
    • Engaging activities
  • Focus on intentional teaching of social skills and emotional competencies
    • Acknowledging the relationship between social skills and challenging behavior
    • Understanding the function of children’s behavior and matching our strategies to the function of behavior
    • Teaching across the day rather then in response to challenging behavior
    • Giving children strategies that they can use in a variety of situations
benefits stronger relationships
Benefits: Stronger Relationships
  • Teacher/child interactions are more intentional & meaningful.
  • Teaching staff understand what “trips their trigger” and how their reactions can escalate challenging behavior.
  • There is a real partnership between the family and the teaching staff. They build a relationship.
  • Families have said that they have learned to like their child again!
benefits improvements in staff morale confidence and teamwork
Benefits: Improvements in Staff Morale, Confidence, and Teamwork
  • Staff satisfaction has increased.
  • Staff turnover has decreased.
  • Staff feel confident in their consistent use of PBS strategies.
  • Staff have more time to teach because they are better prepared for the children.
  • Staff work better as a team.
benefits staff empowerment
Benefits: Staff Empowerment
  • Staff are implementing the Teaching Pyramid with fidelity.
  • Staff are better able to track children’s challenging behavior and respond proactively.
  • Staff have hope!
  • The focus is on prevention instead of intervention.
benefits child outcomes
Benefits: Child Outcomes
  • There are fewer referrals to external experts, we know what to do.
  • Children are improving in their social emotional competence over the program year.
  • Children are having fewer problems across the year.
  • Children are improving when they receive intensive behavioral interventions.
tier 1 in infant toddler classrooms
Tier 1 in Infant-Toddler Classrooms
  • Primary caregiving
  • Routines are individualized based on the needs of each child
  • Adults use routines to interact socially with infants and toddlers
  • Adults interact verbally with children mapping their activities and emotions
  • Adults respond to children’s signs of distress
tier 1 in infant toddler classrooms15
Tier 1 in Infant Toddler Classrooms
  • Adults support interactions between toddlers
  • Adults redirect children who are engaging in challenging behaviors
the pyramid infant toddler observation system tpitos
The Pyramid Infant Toddler Observation System (TPITOS)
  • Importance of translating theory to practice
  • Measuring implementation
  • Using information for professional development
  • Structure of the TPITOS
    • Classroom Design/Key Adult Variables
    • Red Flags
  • Current status of TPITOS
the importance of universal screening
Finding children needing more than the foundationThe importance of universal screening
infant toddler s e screening
Infant/Toddler S-E Screening
  • Child social-emotional development and functioning
  • Environmental support for child social-emotional

behavior and development (center/classroom and home)

  • Key adult-child interaction behaviors that predict important child social-emotional outcomes
social emotional development functioning
Social-Emotional Development & Functioning

Ages and Stages Questionnaire- Social-Emotional

(ASQ-SE; Bricker et al.)

Caregiver report

10-15 minutes to complete

Provides a cut-off score for social-emotional concerns

general environment support of social emotional behavior functioning
General Environment Support of Social-Emotional Behavior & Functioning

The Pyramid Infant Toddler Observation Scale

(TPITOS)

14 Red Flags

24 Classroom design and behavior items

Rated on a 4-point scale (exemplary practice to not observed)

Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME IT; Caldwell & Bradley)

45 items completed during home interview

6 subscales related to the home environment (parent involvement presence of appropriate materials and opportunities)

considerations for selecting implementing
Considerations for Selecting & Implementing

Repeatable

Brief

Easy to use and score

Inexpensive

Reliable and valid

Capable of telling programs:

When there is a concern

What intervention needs to zero in on

Whether intervention is making a difference

externalizing concerns
Externalizing Concerns
  • Severe tantrums
    • Hitting, kicking, biting
  • Difficulty accepting guidance
    • Screaming no, throwing toys and materials
internalizing concerns
Internalizing Concerns
  • Withdrawn
  • Unengaged with people or materials
  • Sad, anxious, irritable
  • Have a hard time being comforted
dysregulation concerns
Dysregulation Concerns
  • Difficult to read signals
    • Hard to recognize when they are happy or upset
  • Rapidly changing signals
    • Move quickly & with little warning to unconsolable crying
  • Difficulty calming
  • Difficulty with routines
    • Falling asleep, staying asleep
    • Feeding
screening identification
Screening Identification
  • Parent or teacher report (ASQ-SE)
  • HOME
  • TPITOS
tier 2 intervention
Tier 2 Intervention
  • Intervention becomes more individualized
  • Involves a closer look at teacher-child interaction in the classroom
    • Focusing in on a child’s signals
    • Looking at adult behaviors that foster positive child behavior
    • Looking at adult behaviors that get in the way of supporting child positive behavior
    • Identifying specific ways that teachers can respond to a child’s individual signals to:
      • Support and build on positive signals
      • Reduce stress in response to negative signals
indicator of parent child interaction
Indicator of Parent-Child Interaction

IPCI (Baggett, Carta, & Horn, 2003)

Brief rating scale following observation of authentic interaction activities at home/center

Adult behaviors that facilitate child social-emotional development

Adult behaviors that interfere with child social-emotional development

Child engagement

Child distress

ipci use
IPCI Use
  • Completed for children for whom Tier 1 concerns are identified
    • ASQ-SE
    • HOME
    • Classroom Environment
  • Teacher-child interaction
    • Classroom supervisor
    • Lead teacher while observing assistant teacher-child interaction
  • Parent-child interaction in the center or home
    • Completed by a home visitor (teacher, family advocate, social worker)
who might need intensive intervention
Who might need intensive intervention?
  • Children who are not showing progress in response to Tier 2 intervention.
  • Children whose development and behavior is identified as extremely off-track and teachers are unable to manage their behavior or support them without intensive supports.
purpose of tier 3
Purpose of Tier 3
  • No change as a result of your prevention strategies and intervention strategies at the lower levels of the pyramid.
  • Behaviors escalate.
tier 3
Tier 3
  • Team based process
  • Functional assessment
  • Individualized behavior support plan
    • Prevention strategies
    • Replacement skills
    • Adult responses to children’s behavior
  • Implemented across environments
  • Linked to services beyond the classroom as needed
role of families in the pyramid
Role of Families in the Pyramid
  • Families are involved from the very beginning of the model.
  • If additional support is needed for a child, staff work directly with the family. We will go to their home or they can come to the center…family choice.
  • Training in Positive Behavior Support is available to families.
  • The family is considered the “expert” on the child. They play an important role in any planning process.
  • Families are taught to take Behavior Incident Reports.. Their observations are very valuable for planning.
partnerships
Partnerships
  • Family support plans are an option.
  • Mental health partners are in the centers regularly to work with parents and staff on prevention strategies.
  • Mental health partners are available for consultation in the home, at the center or in their office…family choice.
  • The staff and the family are a team. We share results of our observations and compare our data.
  • We use specific praise with parents as well as children and each other.
summary and conclusions
Summary and Conclusions
  • Some of the same features of the original Teaching Pyramid can be applied to programs serving infants and toddlers.
  • Strong foundation equals prevention.
  • We need to ensure fidelity of implementation of the foundation.
  • Families are a central feature of Infant-Toddler Teaching Pyramid.
  • Measures are available for carrying out universal screening to determine which children might need more intensive supports.
  • Measures for monitoring progress of children in their interaction with caregivers.
  • Successful implementation of the model will depend on the strong collaboration with community partners.
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