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Welcome to the 21CLD Workshop
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  1. Welcome to the 21CLD Workshop 21st Century Learning Design Isabel Brennan Baldev Singh

  2. Learning Design Learning Goals Deepen understanding of innovative teaching practices Collaborate in analyzing and advancing our own Learning Activities Plan how to use this project for educator collaboration in our schools

  3. What does “innovative teaching” mean to you?

  4. Economic Change and The Learning Process

  5. ITL ResearchInnovative Teaching and Learning A global research program that investigates how schools and systems can encourage innovative teaching practices and the impact innovative teaching practices have on students’ learning. ITL is the foundation for 21st Century Learning Design

  6. Education System Change School Leadership and Culture 2009-2012 Innovative Teaching and Learning Research 2012-future From Research to Practice (today’s work) Innovative Teaching Practices Individuals with skills for life and work today

  7. SKILLS FOR LIFE AND WORK TODAY www.itlresearch.com Knowledge building Problem solving & innovation Self-regulation & assessment ICT use Global awareness Collaboration Skilled communication

  8. Innovative Teaching Practices Student Centered Pedagogies ICT Integration Extending Learning • Personalized • Collaborative • Knowledge construction • Self-regulation • Problem Solving • 24/7 learning opportunities • Global and cultural understanding • Skilled communication • By educators • By students • Basic usage vs. higher-level usage

  9. Schools from over 45 countries using these methods to build innovative teaching capacity

  10. What we learned Students 21C Skills Score Source: ITL 2011, LASW method, based on analysis by SRI International Learning Activity Score (Innovative Teaching)

  11. What school factor do you think is most associated with innovative teaching practices in schools?

  12. What we learned Collaboration about teaching among educators in a school Strongly associated with Innovative Teaching Practices Innovative Teaching Practices Source: ITL 2010-11 Teacher Survey, across 7 countries; based on analysis by SRI International.

  13. What type of professional development builds innovative teaching practices?

  14. Professional Development and innovative teaching practices 0.28 Practice a new teaching method Conducted research 0.25 0.23 Planned or practiced using ICT in teaching Reviewed and discussed student work 0.23 Observed a demonstration of ICT use 0.18 0.18 Developed or reviewed curriculum materials Received or delivered one-on-one coaching or mentoring 0.17 Planned a lesson or a unit 0.15 Observed a demonstration of a lesson 0.15 Listened to a lecture 0.03 Source: ITL teacher survey, 2011, Based on analysis by SRI International

  15. Learning Design: Project goals Develop shared understanding of important 21st Century skills, and how learning activities can provide opportunities to build them Use detailed definitions and rubrics as a collaborative framework to discuss and analyze learning activity designs Explore the link between learning activity design and the work that students do

  16. Learning Design: 21C Skills Framework

  17. Learning Design: 21C Skills Framework

  18. Learning Design: Let’s Do It For each 21stCentury skill, we will: Learn and discuss common definitions and a rubric Apply these ideas to sample learning activities – how strong are the opportunities they give students to build this skill? Use the rubric to strengthen a learning activity Look at the relationship between learning activity design and student work

  19. What does collaboration mean?

  20. Collaboration In today’s interconnected world of business, real project work often requires collaboration across organizations (e.g. a collaboration between a pharmaceutical company and a chemical engineering company to produce a new vaccine), or with people in a different part of the world. This type of working requires strong collaboration skills to work productively on a team and to integrate individual expertise and ideas into a coherent solution. Do your learning activities model this today?

  21. How is “knowledge work” produced? Through real COLLABORATION One model: RACSI (identifies key roles and responsibilities for each individual involved in the project) Example: ITL Research Project - www.itlresearch.com

  22. Review example learning activities Indigenous cultures Doing Business in Birmingham 

  23. Discussion Were these good examples of collaboration? Why or why not? 

  24. The Learning Design Rubric: This rubric examines whether students are working with others on the learning activity, and the quality of that collaboration. At higher levels of the rubric students have shared responsibility for their work, and the learning activity is designed in a way that requires students to make substantive decisions together. These features help students learn the important collaboration skills of negotiation, conflict resolution, agreement on what must be done, distribution of tasks, listening to the ideas of others and integration of ideas into a coherent whole. The strongest learning activities are designed so that student work is interdependent, requiring all students to contribute in order for the team to succeed.

  25. Review Rubric Collaboration

  26. What code would you give these Learning activities for collaboration Indigenous cultures Doing Business in Birmingham 

  27. What code would you give these Learning activities for collaboration Indigenous cultures (3) Doing Business in Birmingham  (5)

  28. E-Twinning examples. What code? Cooking and culture Our landscapes

  29. E-Twinning examples. Improvements? Cooking and culture Our landscapes

  30. Knowledge Construction….?

  31. What is “knowledge work”? Creating Social Programs Policies & Laws Web apps & Software Marketing & Strategies Design & Engineering

  32. Knowledge Construction We often hear the term “knowledge economy.” More and more, people are expected to not only be intelligent consumers of information, but also to create information and ideas. In this rubric, students are asked to do the same: to evaluate, synthesize, analyze and interpret information. We have overwhelming access to data so we must prepare students to be informed consumers and smart producers who can integrate information from multiple sources across multiple disciplines in order to further expand their learning and make sense of the world. Do your learning activities model this today?

  33. Review example learning activities Indigenous cultures Doing Business in Birmingham 

  34. The Learning Design Rubric: Knowledge construction activities require students to generate ideas and understandings that are new to them. Students can do this through interpretation, analysis, synthesis or evaluation. In stronger activities, knowledge construction is the main requirement of the learning activity. The strongest activities require students to apply the knowledge they constructed in a different context, helping them to deepen their understanding further, and to connect information and ideas from two or more academic disciplines (for example, integrating learning from both science and literature).

  35. Review Rubric Knowledge Construction

  36. What code would you give these Learning activities for Knowledge Building? Indigenous cultures Doing Business in Birmingham http://www.piltrainer.com/

  37. What code would you give these Learning activities for Knowledge Building? Indigenous cultures (2) Doing Business in Birmingham (5)

  38. E-Twinning examples. What code for Knowledge Building? Cooking and culture Our landscapes

  39. E-Twinning examples. What code for Knowledge Building? Cooking and culture Our landscapes

  40. E-Twinning examples. Improvements? Cooking and culture Our landscapes

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