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The Bomb - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Please do not talk at this time Oct 2/3. HW: No HW. The Bomb. As we go through this lecture record the Level of Threat you feel at the Information. 1= as threatening as a kitten. 10= as threatening as a long painful death. Information on the Bomb Level of Threat.

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Presentation Transcript
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As we go through this lecture record the Level of Threat you feel at the Information. 1= as threatening as a kitten. 10= as threatening as a long painful death.

Information on the Bomb Level of Threat

Put this on pg. 34A

in your notebook.

Label it:

The Bomb

blast wave effect on structures and thermal pulse http www youtube com watch v r0duiq8ghgc
Blast Wave Effect on Structures and Thermal Pulsehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0dUIq8gHgc“

The Fearsome Power of Nature Unleashed…

A few minutes after detonation of the atomic blast in Operation Cue, May 5, 1955.

slide5

And yet , we kept producing them…..

U.S. military observers watch the explosion during Operation Crossroads Baker, a nuclear test conducted on Bikini Atoll on July 25, 1946. (Pacific Ocean)

This was the fifth nuclear explosion ever, after two other tests and the two bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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1971 photo of a nuclear bomb detonated by the French government at the Mururoa atoll, French Polynesia (Pacific Ocean)

slide8

The Fearsome Power of Nature Unleashed…

For all Videos in this PPT please refer to this LINK.“Now I am Become Death…”

slide9

Ivy Mike-First successful H-Bomb AKA Super Bomb

Detonation Power from Fusion

10 Megatons

slide18

Everything inside these circles is Dust….with only one megaton bomb.

Most warheads now carry 15 megatons or more.

nuclear warhead stockpiles of the united states and the soviet union russia 1945 2006
Total stockpiles, including warheads that are not actively deployed (that is, including those on reserve status or those that may be scheduled for dismantlement).

The numbers of active/operational warheads could be much smaller in the present time, circa 5,700 for the United States and 5,800.

Highs:

1966: USA=32,040

1986: USSR=45,000

The point at which the USSR surpassed the USA in warheads is 1978.

Nuclear warhead stockpiles of the United States and the Soviet Union/Russia, 1945-2006.
the new start treaty
The New START Treaty
  • Ratified by the US Senate in Dec. 2010.
  • Took effect on Feb. 5, 2011
  • The treaty builds on the original START, (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty), first proposed by President Ronald Reagan, which went into effect in 1994.
  • The New START limits each side to 1,550 strategic warheads, down from 2,200. It limits the number of deployed strategic launchers and heavy bombers to 700.
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What do you notice about who has Nukes on this chart? Where did they get them?

Why do China, France, India, etc, have so few nuclear weapons?

Compared with other nations today… (1984)

slide22

The World’s Nuclear Weapons:

Nuclear weapons programs are generally shrouded in secrecy and all of the totals listed above should be considered estimates.The numbers in the chart above are based on the most recent available estimates from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

slide24

Nuclear Winter

The great fear of the 1980’s- How would we live after WWIII?

Nuclear Winter meant months, maybe years of freezing temperatures, limited sunlight, massive radiation poisoning and a slow death from starvation and disease

slide25

1983- The Day After

On the night of its television broadcast (Sunday, November 20, 1983), ABC and many of its local TV stations opened several 1-800 hotlines with counselors standing by to calm jittery viewers. During the original broadcast, there were no commercial breaks after the nuclear attack.

ABC also aired a live and very heated debate, hosted by Nightline's Ted Koppel, featuring scientist Carl Sagan and conservative writer William F. Buckley, Jr.. Sagan argued against nuclear proliferation, while Buckley promoted the concept of nuclear deterrence. During the debate, Sagan discussed the concept of nuclear winter and made his famous analogy, equating the arms race to "two sworn enemies standing waist-deep in gasoline, one with three matches, the other with five.“

The film's effect was also felt in Kansas City and Lawrence (where the film took place). One psychotherapist counseled a group that watched at Shawnee Mission East High School in the Kansas City suburbs, and 1,000 others held candles at a peace vigil in Penn Valley Park in downtown Kansas City. In Lawrence, a discussion group called Let Lawrence Live was formed by the English department at the university, and several dozen more people from the Humanities department gathered on the University of Kansas campus in front of the university's Memorial Campanile and lit candles in a peace vigil.

slide27

This…

…was the terrifying world I grew up in…

What words did you record to describe your reaction to this information?

slide28
How is the world I grew up in with the threat of Nuclear War similar and different from the world after 9/11?
  • Fill in:

The world today is similar to the Cold War era because:___________________________.

Living during the nuclear Cold War era is different than how we live today because:____________________________.

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Cold War From just after WWII until 1991, when the

U.S. and the U.S.S.R. competed with one

another to increase influence around the world

Super Power An extremely powerful nation capable of

influencing international events and the acts

and policies of less powerful nations.

Nation Building Thedeliberate efforts by a foreign power to

build a new national government.

Partition Dividing one country into two or more countries

Iron Curtain Europe’s division between mostly democratic Western

Europe and Communist Eastern Europe.