writing workshop nov 14 2013 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Writing Workshop Nov. 14, 2013 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Writing Workshop Nov. 14, 2013

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 18

Writing Workshop Nov. 14, 2013 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 117 Views
  • Uploaded on

Writing Workshop Nov. 14, 2013. Presented by: Carrie Curry Cheryl Lidsky. TESTING DATES. APRIL 1: Revising, Editing, One Composition April 2: Revising, Editing, One Composition. Performance Level Descriptors. Three Levels of Performance Level I: Unsatisfactory Level II: Satisfactory

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Writing Workshop Nov. 14, 2013' - dasha


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
writing workshop nov 14 2013

Writing WorkshopNov. 14, 2013

Presented by:

Carrie Curry

Cheryl Lidsky

testing dates
TESTING DATES
  • APRIL 1: Revising, Editing, One Composition
  • April 2: Revising, Editing, One Composition
performance level descriptors
Performance Level Descriptors
  • Three Levels of Performance
    • Level I: Unsatisfactory
    • Level II: Satisfactory
    • Level III Advanced
narrative writing process
Narrative Writing Process
  • Brainstorm
  • Magnify Once
  • Magnify Twice
  • Story Web/Story Map/Story Outline
  • Rough Draft
  • Revise/Edit
  • Final Copy
  • Reread for Accuracy (Make Corrections!)
distinctive writing
Distinctive Writing
  • Primary “Causes”
    • Character Development
    • Higher Level Insight
    • Object Placement
    • Story Twists/Surprises
    • Roller Coaster of Emotions
    • At least one “starred” paragraph
distinctive writing1
Distinctive Writing
  • “Secondary Causes”
    • Unique Transitions
    • Awesome Vocabulary
    • Elaborate Descriptions
    • Poignant Conversation
distinctive writing2
Distinctive Writing
  • “Symptoms”
    • Legible Handwriting
    • Consistent/Correct Spelling of Common Words
    • Effective Grammatical Concepts
    • Incredible Introductions/Conclusions
    • Catchy Title
expository writing
Expository Writing
  • Informative
  • Informative & Why*
  • Procedural How To
  • Masked Procedural
  • Classificatory
expository writing process
Expository Writing Process
  • Brainstorm
  • “The Big I” or I-Write Plan
  • Rough Draft
  • Revise/Edit
  • Final Copy
  • Reread for Accuracy (Make Corrections!)
the i write plan the big i
The I-Write Plan“The Big I”
  • The planning tool for expository writing
how why cafe
How & Why CAFE
  • Strategies to improve expository writing
  • Brief “splashes”, not “swimming”
    • How
    • Why
    • Caution
    • Anecdote
    • Fact
    • Example
following slides taken from tepsa presentation by

Following Slides taken from TEPSA Presentation by:

Victoria Young

Director of Reading, Writing, and

Social Studies Assessments

Texas Education Agency

in a nutshell lower score range
In a Nutshell—Lower Score Range

Typical Problems

  • Wrong or weakly matched organizational structure/form for purpose
    • personal narrative instead of expository
    • fantasy instead of personal narrative
    • expository instead of personal narrative
    • Weak, evolving, or nonexistent central idea
      • negatively affects focus and coherence; causes the writer to “jump” from idea or idea or exclude extraneous information
in a nutshell lower score range1
In a Nutshell—Lower Score Range

Typical Problems

  • Wasted space: repetition, wordiness, looping/ meandering, meaningless introductions and conclusions, development that does not contribute (e.g., the “bed-to-bed” approach)
  • Inclusion of too many different ideas for one page (26 lines)
  • General/vague/imprecise use of language
  • Essay poorly crafted
  • Weak written language conventions (errors evident in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage; lack of sentence boundaries)
in a nutshell higher score range
In a Nutshell—Higher Score Range

Typical Strengths

  • Strong match between structure/form and purpose
  • Explicit central (controlling) idea and sustained focus
  • “Narrow and deep” development with no wasted words or space Think

QualityoverQuantity

Both planning and revision absolutely essential since students don’t have the space to “write their way into” a better piece.

in a nutshell higher score range1
In a Nutshell—Higher Score Range

Typical Strengths

  • Introduction and conclusion short but effective
  • Specific use of language
  • Essay well crafted
  • Strong written language conventions

Remember: “Strong” doesn’t mean “perfect”!