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BRING BACK TO PEOPLE’S MINDS

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  1. BRING BACK TO PEOPLE’S MINDS H. B. MSITA THURSDAY 11TH JULY 2019

  2. Opening RemarksStephen Nindi, Director NLUC • A technical committee was formed in 2018 to reflect on critical issues in Kilombero Landscape • A strategy developed for the Kilombero Valley • A Steering committee was formed • A Multi Stakeholder Platform was formed • The Kilombero Valley is rich in resources including game reserves, forest reserves, tourism opportunities and biggest flood plain in Africa • There are many catchment resources including water for hydro power development and irrigation • Many investors exist including Kilombero Sugar company.

  3. Opening RemarksStephen Nindi, Director NLUC • There is need to ensure better land use to improve livelihoods of people • The Selous game reserve, is famous in the world for its flood plain vegetation • Unless resources are managed efficiently, sustainability of the Valley is not possible. • Participants should aim to put away their titles in order to discuss openly during the LUD. • Need to find solutions/ means to improve NRM in the Kilombero Landscape

  4. The DCC, officially opened the LUD • Welcomed participants to Kilombero District Council and assured the of security • Emphasized that the platform exists to promote dialogue on natural resource management in Kilombero • Noted that Kilombero Landscape is important for the Morogoro region because of its contribution to social, environmental and economic sustainability • Congratuled AWF on introducing the MSP. Appreciated AWF’s role in coordinating activities of the MSP • Requested that members needed to put away their respective titles and discuss constructively to ensure better and comprehensive planning for the Kilombero Landscape

  5. The DCC, officially opened the LUD • Requested that members needed to put away their respective titles and discuss constructively to ensure better and comprehensive planning for the Kilombero Landscape • Appreciated the presence and enthusiasm exhibited by the District Directors in the MSP. Emphasized that DDs have power to decide investment matters in their respective areas of jurisdiction and re therefore critical stakeholders in the landscape. • Wished members good deliberations. • Officially opened the LUD and noted that he will be a co-chair during the LUD.

  6. TFD presentationGary Dunning • LUD is a global initiative • Concepts of the initiative-MSP in Kilombero fits in the Global Initiative • TFD works on multiple issues including LUD • TFD is 20 years old • Works to build partnerships and how stakeholders work together • TFD has worked with different organizations across the world

  7. TFD presentationGary Dunning • LUD Initiative • Helps stakeholders to develop landscape approach • Key elements include; • Strategy to reconcile competing issues • Multisectoral and multi sectoral • Balance and connect global development objectives to local national issues and realities • Adaptive management processes • Understanding key tradeoffs, policy options, investments and development opportunities

  8. TFD presentationGary Dunning • Critical is the need to make compromises across different interests and across time • Critical steps • Stakeholder identification • Multi-stakeholder Platform • Building shared understanding • Collaborative planning e.g. vision creation • Collective implementation of the plan • Monitoring and evaluation phase and process to understand what is working and not working • It’s a Continuous process

  9. TFD presentationGary Dunning • LUD specific activities include 5 phases • Research phase to identify challenges that includes stakeholder identification • Round tables • LUD and MSP • Continued Dialogue • Monitoring Evaluation and Adaptation

  10. TFD presentationGary Dunning • Case studies • Steering committee of TFD initiated the idea in 2014 • Testing in real landscapes • Had a lot of thinking about concepts behind the LUD. Seems had never been tested before so 2 pilots were started in Brazil and Tanzania • Current phase demonstrates a matured LUD with IUCN Plus project, funded by IKI-Germany • Uganda (AgoroAgu), Ghana (Wasa-Menphi and Mole), DRC (Mangai) and Tanzania (Kilombero) • Driven by local partners in each country • Hosted by MSP

  11. TFD presentationGary Dunning • QUESTIONS TO TFD-Gary • Question on what TFD is learning. From TFD’s experience, what are some of the common challenges that have come up in each country context? Are they similar, common and can there be similar approaches to address in different countries? • Answer: Two common challenges across all landscapes: 1). Climate Change, and 2). How to achieve sustainable development. In each case, TFD has learnt that communication and engagement of key stakeholders and decision makers is critical. Creating a MSP is one way to address such challenges. • Question on Indigenous peoples. Free Prior and Informed Consent is an important process especially for indigenous peoples. However, Indigenous peoples may be influenced by positions external to their community. How can this challenge with indigenous be addressed, for example during the MSP?

  12. TFD presentationGary Dunning • Answer: TFD had an initiative on FPIC. FPIC doesn’t only involve Indigenous peoples but should involve all other stakeholders. TFD has learnt that in different contexts, FPIC processes may be challenges when leadership in a community and or country change. It is therefore important to have a period to understand any existing and emerging situations so that they are appropriately addressed. FPIC should therefore not only be for consent but should also include • Question on lessons on political interference. Can TFD share its experience on community involvement in different countries with varying political pressures and contexts?? For example, in Tanzania, there are national directives that may affect Kilombero landscape vision, and what could stakeholders do? • Answer: Political pressures literally affect all stakeholders. TFD can not get involved in political issues but can help create platforms where such issues are discussed. The Kilombero MSP could provide a platform to discuss such issues, and to bring together such stakeholders.

  13. AWF’s-SUSTAIN and PLUS project in KilomberoFadhili • The presentation focused on two projects that AWF and IUCN have been involved in since 2014 and, • Introduced the third project that WWF and Government of Tanzania are designing to start in 2020. • Resultantly, AWF and partners pursue the need to have common landscape conservation and development agenda that doesn’t compromise sustainability. • AWF and partners have therefore implemented

  14. AWF’s-SUSTAIN and PLUS project in KilomberoFadhili A brief background to the uniqueness of Kilombero landscape, that attracts different natural resource users namely; agriculture, sugar plantations, hydro power development, pastoralism, fisheries and business. Key natural resources in the landscape include National Parks, Wetlands, Game Controlled Areas, Nature Reserves, Plantations and the Miombo natural forests (Map 1).

  15. AWF’s-SUSTAIN and PLUS project in KilomberoFadhili • SUSTAIN (Sustainability Inclusion Strategies of Growth Corridors of Africa): • The five year project implemented from 2014 – 2018 was led by IUCN’s in Tanzania and Mozambique. • The aim was to promote inclusive green growth targeting productive landscapes in three thematic areas: • water security, • land resources management, • business practices and policy, • learning and evidence. • In Tanzania, the project targeted the Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor (SAGCOT) along the Tanzania Zambia Railway. • SUSTAIN supported the Kilombero Valley MSP activities in 2018.

  16. AWF’s-SUSTAIN and PLUS project in KilomberoFadhili • PLUS (Stabilizing Land Use Project) started in 2017 in four countries (Tanzania, Uganda, DRC, and Ghana) in Africa and is expected to be complete in 2020. • IUCN leads implementation in partnership with partners in each country. In Tanzania, IUCN works with AWF to deliver activities on the ground in the Kilombero Landscape. • This project is implemented following IUCN’s Protected Area Categories V and VI as Landscape Mechanisms for Enhancing Biodiversity in Agricultural Land, Ecological Connectivity and REDD+. • The project has established MSP, steering committee, Technical Committee and supported the first MSP in Morogoro in March 2019. • To ensure that activities of the MSP are sustained, WWF is interested in working with the MSP to take some of the proposals forward through a project funded by GEF 7.

  17. AWF’s-SUSTAIN and PLUS project in KilomberoFadhili • Question for AWF • Does the MSP have membership of banks and other investors? • Answer: Currently there are no private sector companies on the MSP but the platform is open to receive any stakeholder, including banks and other private sector.

  18. WWF-GEF 7 Integrated Land Use and Restoration Program for Tanzania Productive Forest Landscapes. • The presentation was given by Dr. Ezekiel E. Mwakalukwa, Forestry and Beekeeping Division, Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism (MNRT). •  Participants were informed that the MNRT is designing a four-year project to be financed by GEF 7 up to $8.25m. • The overall cost, including cash and in-kind co-financing is about $60m. Project idea development began in 2017. • The title was “Towards Sustainable Forest Management in Tanzania” but it was revised to “Integrated Land Use and Restoration Program for Tanzania’s Productive Forest Landscapes” after an inter-ministerial meeting in 2018. • WWF is helping to develop the full project in consultation with stakeholders who include government and non-government actors.

  19. WWF-GEF 7 Integrated Land Use and Restoration Program for Tanzania Productive Forest Landscapes. • Project Rationale • The project has a conceptual model which reveals the need to address seven land use change factors namely population, poverty, climate change, markets for agriculture products, poor institutional capacity and governance, and limited education, awareness and capacity. • The project context includes key barriers around weak institutional planning processes, policy regulatory failures, weak transboundary cooperation, poor community and private sector engagement and inadequate capacity to achieve landscape goals. • These barriers have bread significant threats and impacts to biodiversity and livelihoods in a number of ways including land use change, change in hydrological regimes, unsustainable agriculture practices and resource use conflicts. • Consequently, important landscapes are exposed to loss of ecosystem services, climate change impacts and loss of livelihood, and economic opportunities.

  20. WWF-GEF 7 Integrated Land Use and Restoration Program for Tanzania Productive Forest Landscapes. • Project Rationale • The GEF 7 project aims to ensure integrated management of natural resources in several priority landscapes through land- and water management and sustainable and inclusive value chains for a catalyzed natural-resource-based economy and improved community livelihoods. • Kilombero Valley Landscape has been identified as one of the potential landscapes for implementation of this project.

  21. WWF-GEF 7 Integrated Land Use and Restoration Program for Tanzania Productive Forest Landscapes. • The project components; • Components 1: Development of integrated landscape management (ILM) systems. • The two key outcomes; 1). Strengthened ILM planning for Kilombero and Unguja based on an enhanced understanding of land and water use in the targeted landscapes, 2). Enhanced multi-sectoral and intra-governmental coordination and capacity for integrated land and water use. • Component 2: Promotion of sustainable food production practices and responsible value chains. • The Outcomes will include: 1). Agreed national strategies and enabling conditions for the development of sustainable rice value/supply chains; 2). Farmer support systems for sustainable rice value chains strengthened; 3). Investment and finance through private sector for sustainable value chains

  22. WWF-GEF 7 Integrated Land Use and Restoration Program for Tanzania Productive Forest Landscapes. • The project components; • Component 3:Conservation and restoration of natural habitats in order to improve management and restoration of natural ecosystems through implementation of priority land and water use plans, and with active involvement of communities and private sector. • Component 4: Project Coordination and M&E. The program will ensure that an M&E plan is implemented to aid scaling up and adaptive management. • Going forward, project development is expected to be completed by June 2020 and subsequently submitted to GEF secretariat for approval. • Once approval is secured, implementation will commence as soon as possible building on project interventions by PLUS and other similar projects in selected landscapes.

  23. WWF-GEF 7 Integrated Land Use and Restoration Program for Tanzania Productive Forest Landscapes. • Questions on the presentation • Participants wanted to know why the focus is only on rice value chains excluding livestock, yet it breads land use conflicts. • The project is basing its rationale on the fact that crop systems are causing significant land use changes compared to livestock keeping but the project is open to seek for partners that can work on livestock issues. • On the list of stakeholders, where are CSOs? Are they involved in the design of the project? • The government organizations own the project but more stakeholders will be included during design and implementation especially those dealing with Human Wildlife conflicts. By August, designers will have a better picture of who the actors are especially from local level. • How have you involved gender and social safeguards? • That will be addressed during implementation.

  24. SHARED ELEMENTS AND CHALLENGES OF LANDSCAPE VISIONS H. B. MSITA THURSDAY 11TH JULY 2019

  25. What are the key environmental and developmental challenges in the landscape • Lack of good infrastructure to facilitate economic activities including tourism. Currently, most of the roads are not accessible all year round especially during the rainy season when there are severe incidents of flooding • Competing land uses across different interest groups including pastoralists, farmers, businesses, fisheries which breeds conflicts • Agricultural value chains are unstable because of post-harvest losses from limited technology • Poaching still exists although it is limited due to associated dangers • Human-wildlife conflicts especially with elephants • Land and water catchment degradation

  26. What are the key environmental and developmental challenges in the landscape • Forest degradation, and deforestation arising from practices such as charcoal burning • Biodiversity loss for example the population of the Puk antelope has been reducing • Legal Process issues (Litigation) • Migration issues (particularly by pastoral communities, farmers and wildlife) • Weak legal compliance and enforcement • Low technological, business/ financial capacity to manage rich biodiversity • Poor and unsustainable agricultural practices such as slash and burn agriculture

  27. What are the key environmental and developmental challenges in the landscape • Use and overuse of agro-chemicals upstream leading to flooding pollution downstream • Limited land ownership rights with only less than 20% legally having registered land. • Protected Areas are gazetted but not surveyed leading to conflicts over boundaries • Limited number of villages have village land use plans (Of 12,545 villages only about 2,000 have land use plans). Relatedly, there is no clear framework for transboundary collaboration among villages with and those without land-use plans • Gender disparity in asset ownership (livestock, business, fisheries)

  28. What are the key environmental and developmental challenges in the landscape • Increasing population of both humans and wildlife • Persistent Flooding and Drought • Lack of awareness and knowledge on how to manage important natural resources such as wetlands (Ramsar sites), No local/ National law that governs Ramsar sites • Wildlife corridors have no recognized conservation legal status and are being degraded, or blocked by human activities • Lack of management plans for some forest reserves such as Namwai CFR • Political interference in planning and implementation of NRM, and corruption • Poor coordination and cooperation across sectors and offices including local extension staff

  29. What are the key environmental and developmental challenges in the landscape • Some of the indigenous knowledge and customs are ignored because they are not adequately recognized • Lack of application of new technologies to address challenges in Kilombero Valley • Lack of sufficient financial resources to address all challenges in the landscape

  30. Guiding Question: What is your group’s vision for the landscape in 10 years? • Vision • Group I: A landscape with integrated natural resources management for conservation and inclusive development • Group III: Kilombero Landscape becomes the epicenter of human life, and the development of the economy • Group IV: Sustainability of Kilombero Valley Landscape • Group V: An Integrated Ecological System that supports economic growth in a sustainable way

  31. Guiding Question: What is your group’s vision for the landscape in 10 years? • To strengthen stakeholders responsibility on natural resources management for sustainable development • Coordination • Communication • Empowerment • Facilitation • Collaboration

  32. WHAT WE DID AND SHARE KEY TAKE AWAYS • Multi-Stakeholder Platform (MSP) established • Emphasized that the platform exists to promote dialogue on natural resource management in Kilombero • Importance of MSP in land Use Dialogue • How SUSTAIN and PLUS projects initiated the formulation of MSP • Key issues that will be worked during the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) Project on “Integrated Land Use and Restoration Program for Tanzania’s Productive Forest Landscapes” • Challenges and opportunity found in Kilombero Landscape • Vision in ten (10) years to come

  33. FEEDBACK FROM FIELD VISITS • KIBASILI • Ecosystem reserves • Eco-tourism • Need to intensify awareness creation and conservation education • Rice value addition • Restoration of Magufuli River Bank • Infrastructure to Kibasila Swamp • Serious engagement to community around (collaborative management) • Management Plan • Up-grade the area around Kibasila swamp to Game Reserve

  34. FEEDBACK FROM FIELD VISITS • KILOMBERO • Quality and clean planting materials (seedcane) • Improved livelihood • Reserve area for conservation set aside • Magombera upgraded to Game Reserve • Human activities should be monitored • Plan to expand sugarcane production • Observed reserved area along Ruaha river should be emphasised • Opportunity to work with farmers to sensitise working in block

  35. SET THE GROUND FOR THE FINAL STRATEGY WORK • Theories presented • Observation made during field excursion • What are the proposed relevant strategies to make our vision come true