ap literary terms review n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
AP Literary Terms review PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
AP Literary Terms review

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 11

AP Literary Terms review - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 128 Views
  • Uploaded on

AP Literary Terms review. Henderson. SYNTAX. Anaphora: “Doubt that the stars are fire, doubt that the sun doth move, doubt truth to be a liar, but never doubt I love.” Epistrophe : “government of the people, by the people, for the people”

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'AP Literary Terms review' - darius


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
syntax
SYNTAX
  • Anaphora: “Doubt that the stars are fire, doubt that the sun doth move, doubt truth to be a liar, but never doubt I love.”
  • Epistrophe: “government of the people, by the people, for the people”
  • Asyndeton: “He was a bag of bones, a floppy doll, a broken stick, a maniac.”
  • Polysyndeton: see next slide for my favorite example. 
slide3

Polysyndeton:

    • Ah, love, let us be trueTo one another! for the world, which seemsTo lie before us like a land of dreams,So various, so beautiful, so new,Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;And we are here as on a darkling plainSwept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,Where ignorant armies clash by night.
  • Chiasmus: “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.”
literary devices
LITERARY DEVICES
  • Antithesis: “Fair is foul and foul is fair.”
    • “For contemplation he and valor formed,/ For softness she and sweet attractive grace;/ He for God only, she for God in him.”
  • Allegory vs. character allegory: a) The Joads’ plight as an allegory for Exodus; b) in John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress, Christian (Everyman) encounters such opposition as Mr. Wordliness and finds himself in the Slough of Despond but finally makes it to the Celestial City.
slide5

Apostrophe: “Pity, you ancient stones, those tender babes whom envy hath immured within your walls.”

    • “Come, you spirits that tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here.”
  • Assonance: “Sweet dreams are made of these/ who am I to disagree?”
  • Consonance: “Flimflarmfrarim filth.” (Eddie Murphy doing his Bill Cosby impression)
    • “I wonder as I wander”
slide6

Alliteration: “Landscape lover, lord of language.”

  • Metonymy: “The White House has not yet released a statement.”
  • Synecdoche: “All hands on deck!”
  • Simile (epic/Homeric): "Just as a hunter urges on his white-fanged hounds, to chase a lion or a wild boar, that's how Hector, son of Priam, like that man-destroyer Ares, urged his great-hearted Trojans on against Ajaeans."
slide7

Litotes: “It was no mean feat to finish my term paper in two nights.”

  • Paradox: “The truest poetry is the most feigning.”
  • Conceit: “This flea is you and I, and this/ Our marriage bed, and marriage temple is.”
  • Metaphor (direct vs. indirect): a) You are my sunshine, my only sunshine. b) “In the middle of the night/ I go walking in my sleep/ from the mountains of faith/ to the river so deep”
characters
CHARACTERS
  • Aristotelian tragic hero:
    • Of noble birth; larger than life
    • Essentially good, but exhibits a fatal flaw (hamartia)
    • Possesses hubris
    • Agent of his own downfall
    • Has a moment of realization (epiphany, anagnorisis)
    • Lives and suffers
  • Classical (Shakespearean hero): adheres to the above criteria, but often dies
slide9

Romantic (Byronic) hero:

    • Larger than life
    • Charismatic
    • Possesses an air of the mysterious or mystical
    • Saves the day! (For the ladies)
    • Embodies freedom, idealism, adventure (related to the Child of Nature)
    • Often exists outside the law: Robin Hood, Ivanhoe, Mr. Rochester (Jane Eyre)
slide10

Modern hero:

    • Everyman
    • Exhibits human weaknesses
    • Caught in the ironies of the human condition
    • Struggles for insight
    • Willy Loman (Death of a Salesman), Tom Joad (Angry Grapes)
slide11

Hemingway hero:

    • Brave, enduring
    • Super-masculine
    • Maintains a sense of humor (often ironic)
    • Exhibits grace under pressure
    • Jake Barnes!
  • Antihero: notably lacks heroic qualities (Randall McMurphy, Holden Caulfield, Home Simpson)