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Tourism Planning in Historic Districts: Attitudes Toward Tourism Development in Charleston. Rich Harrill, Ph.D. Tourism and Regional Assistance Centers (TRACS). About TRACS. Georgia Tech’s Economic Development Institute Tourism research for state, national, and international clients

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tourism planning in historic districts attitudes toward tourism development in charleston
Tourism Planning in Historic Districts: Attitudes Toward Tourism Development in Charleston

Rich Harrill, Ph.D.

Tourism and Regional Assistance Centers

(TRACS)

about tracs
About TRACS
  • Georgia Tech’s Economic Development Institute
  • Tourism research for state, national, and international clients
  • Customer segmentation, market profiling, market feasibility, economic impact, and tourism planning
objectives
Objectives
  • To understand differences in attitudes toward tourism development among neighborhoods based on community attachment variables
  • Explore the role of community attachment in predicting attitudes toward tourism development
hypotheses
Hypotheses
  • Hypothesis one—There are significant differences among neighborhoods regarding attitudes toward tourism development and community attachment.
  • Hypothesis two—There is a significant influence of community attachment variables on attitudes toward tourism development.
dependent variables
Dependent Variables
  • Tourism Impact Attitude Scale (TIAS) (Lankford and Howard, 1993)
  • 28 original items, 5-point response format
  • 19 items (adapted for telephone interviewing)
  • Standard of living, recreational impacts, development issues, and government and public services
independent variables
Independent Variables
  • Situational (Socio-demographic)—age, ethnicity, income, and gender
  • Tenure—birthplace, native, hometown, homeowner, and length of residence
  • Relational—organizations, friendships, kinships, and acquaintances
study area

Charleston

Study Area
  • Charleston, South Carolina
  • Historic, cultural, and ecotourism
  • 2000 population: 96,650
  • 7.4 million tourists in 1997
  • Contributing $2.3 billion per year
neighborhoods
Neighborhoods
  • Ansonborough
    • Located near the city’s administrative center
  • Downtown
    • The city’s commercial core located near theCollege of Charleston
  • Harleston Village
    • Located north of South of Broad, west of Downtown
  • South of Broad
    • Overlooks Charleston Harbor and receives the most concentrated tourism impacts
methods
Methods
  • 1999 random sample of 2,599 households
  • 29401 Zip Code
  • 404 completed surveys
  • 58 percent response rate using CATI (Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing)
dimension of attitudes toward tourism development
Dimension of Attitudes Toward Tourism Development
  • Factor 1: Negative Impacts
    • Eigenvalue: 3.36; Percent variance explained: 22.38; Factor mean = 2.96; Reliability alpha = .7834
  • Factor 2: Economic Benefits
    • Eigenvalue: 2.65; Percent variance Explained: 17.63; Factor Mean = 3.28; Reliability alpha = .8203
  • Factor 3: Cultural Benefits
    • Eigenvalue: 2.64; Percent variance explained: 17.59; Factor mean = 2.21; Reliability alpha = .8115
hypothesis one
Hypothesis One
  • Supported: There are significant differences among neighborhoods regarding attitudes toward tourism development and community attachment variables (ANOVA).
  • Negative impacts (South of Broad and Harleston Village),
    • (HARL = 3.20 and SOB = 2.79), (F = 5.92; p = .001)
hypothesis one1
Hypothesis One
  • Economic Benefits (South of Broad, Downtown, and Harleston Village),
    • (SOB = 3.60, HARL = 3.02, and DOWN = 3.01), (F = 14.23; p = .001)
  • Cultural Benefits (South of Broad and Harleston Village),
    • (SOB = 2.37 and HARL = 1.99), (F = 5.64; p = .001)
hypothesis two
Hypothesis Two
  • Supported: There is a significant influence of community attachment on attitudes toward tourism development (regression).
  • Regression model for economic benefits factor based on attachment variables
    • (F = 5.043; p = .001), (Adjusted R squared = .075).
    • Significant variables: Downtown, tourism employment, Harleston Village, gender, number of relatives
hypothesis two1
Hypothesis Two
  • Regression model for cultural benefits factor based on attachment variables
    • (F = 2.078; p = .013), (Adjusted R squared = .075).
    • Significant variables: Harleston Village, homeownership
implications for tourism planning
Implications for Tourism Planning
  • Neighborhood outreach—“family friendly” tourism
  • Economic policy—tax abatement
  • Regional tourism—dispersal
  • Urban design
conclusions
Conclusions
  • Investment plus roots
  • Equation implies negative attitudes toward tourism development.
  • Tourism planning mediates external development pressures and internal resident attitudes.
contact
Contact
  • Rich Harrill, Ph.D.
  • Phone: (803) 777-7682
  • E-mail: rharrill@hrsm.sc.edu