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Social, Political, Economic Context for Obesity Policy. Elizabeth Johnson, MS, RD Senior Advisor to the Secretary USDA. Where are we today?. 64% of Americans overweight or obese 33% overweight 31% obese, double the rate in 1980 CDC reports that between 1971 & 2000:

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social political economic context for obesity policy

Social, Political, Economic Context for Obesity Policy

Elizabeth Johnson, MS, RD

Senior Advisor to the Secretary

USDA

where are we today
Where are we today?
  • 64% of Americans overweight or obese
    • 33% overweight
    • 31% obese, double the rate in 1980
  • CDC reports that between 1971 & 2000:
    • Women increased caloric intake 22%
    • Men increased caloric intake 7%
where are we today cont
Where are we today? (cont)

1999-2000 estimates:

  • 15% of children aged 6-11 years overweight
  • 16% of adolescents 12-19 years overweight
  • This is a doubling for children and a tripling for adolescents over the past two decades
obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1985
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985

Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2001
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001

Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

slide6

Trends in Obesity-Related Media Coverage

Note: Figures represent IFIC tracking of U.S. and International (English-speaking) wire reports and print articles on the issue and do not necessarily reflect the true number of stories.

slide8

CNPP

Proposed Recommendations vs. Consumption

slide9

CNPP

Proposed Recommendations vs. Consumption

slide10

Easiest thing to do: Change your attitude!

Percent of respondents Completely Agreeing with the statement:

“People who are not overweight look a lot more attractive.”

Source: National Eating Trends®Years Ending February

slide11

Now more Americans want to lose weight!

“I would like to lose at least 20 pounds.”

Percent of respondents Completely Agreeing, Agreeing Mostly, or Agree Somewhat with the statement:

Source: National Eating Trends®Years Ending February

political context
Political Context
  • States considering “sin taxes” on foods
    • Other countries have imposed taxes
  • States & localities policies on school meals
    • Restrict access to foods of minimal nutritional value
slide14

Health - Nutritional Supplement Sales

Yet, Americans are concerned about their health as long as it is convenient.

U.S. Nutritional Supplement Sales

(billions)

$11.50

$10.30

$8.96

95

96

97

Source: Nutrition Business Journal

dietary supplements estimated us sales
Dietary Supplements Estimated US Sales
  • Supplements
    • 1999 $16.3 billion
    • 2001 $17.7 billion
    • 2002 $18.7 billion (3.8% growth)
  • Herbals
    • 2002 $4.3 billion (-.28% growth)
  • Omega 3 F.A.
    • 2002 $290 million (25% growth)

Source: Nutrition Business Journal

cost of overweight obesity
Cost of overweight & obesity
  • CDC estimated 2000 cost is $117 billion
    • $61 billion direct medical cost
    • $56 billion in lost productivity
  • 400,000 deaths linked to overweight & obesity
less concern about calories in our meals
Less concern about calories in our meals

Percent of Homemakers Completely/Mostly Agreeing

“I am always conscious of the calories in the meals I serve.”

less concern about fat in our meals
Less concern about fat in our meals!

Percent of Homemakers Completely Agreeing

“A person should be very cautious in serving foods with fat.”

nutritional concerns attitude vs behavior

Behavior= Percent Of Individual Eating Low/No Substance once in 2 weeks

Attitude= “A person should be very cautious in serving foods with ” (top box agreement)

Cholesterol

Salt

Behavior

Behavior

Attitude

Attitude

Sugar

Behavior

Caffeine

Behavior

Attitude

Attitude

Nutritional Concerns - Attitude vs. Behavior
diet dilemma what should americans eat

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Diet Dilemma:What Should Americans Eat?

Nutrient Intake in Various Diets

Sat Fat

Mono & Poly Fat

Carbo

Protein

25

35

22

18

Atkins

7

33

15

45

Reaven

55

10

20

15

AHA Step I

55

7

23

15

AHA Step 2

50-60

7

18-23

15

ATP III

40

6

24

30

The Zone

55

6

21

18

Dash

Ornish

3

72

7

18

US D.R.I.

20-35

45 - 65

10-35

Adapted from: Wilson P., 2002

setting appropriate calorie levels estimated energy requirements for men and women

Setting appropriate calorie levelsEstimated Energy Requirements for men and women

3000

2000

1000

Active

20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Age in years

Sedentary

conclusions
Conclusions
  • Obesity is a serious health in the U.S.
  • Our past policy has not curbed this health issue
  • The issue of overweight and obesity is multifaceted with no simple answers
conclusions30
Conclusions
  • The Bush Administration’s HealthierUS initiative has challenged all Agencies to address this health issue within new policy
  • We look forward to the partnership with health professionals, academics and industry in reversing this critical health issue