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WHAT DO WE KNOW?

  • Role and effects:
  •  CEs/AEs transfer large amounts of heat, mass, momentum and biogeochemical properties from their regions of formation to remote areas where they impact budgets of the tracers and influence the ocean-atmosphere interactions and Earth´s climate [Bryan, 1996; Wunsch, 1999; Roemmich and Gilson, 2001; Jayne and Marotzke, 2002; Qiu and Chen, 2005].
  •  the vertical movements observed in the interior of CEs/AEs can transport, mix and vertically redistribute these tracers and impact their global budgets [Falkowski et al., 1991; McGillicuddy et al., 1998 ; Sieggel et al.,1999 ; McGillicuddy et al., 2007 ; Klein and Lapeyre, 2009].
  • Through the physical and biological environments can impact the whole marine ecosystem from plankton distribution to higher trophic levels [Bakun, 2006, Logerwell and Smith, 2001; Seki et al., 2002; Domokos et al., 2007; Spear et al., 2001; Yen et al., 2006; Cotté et al., 2011].
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THE PCCS: WHAT DO WE KNOW?

  • Observations : From altimeter signals [Chelton et al., 2007; Chaigneau et al., 2008; 2009], color satellite images [Correa-Ramirez et al., 2007], surface-drifter trajectories [Chaigneau and Pizarro, 2005c].
  •  Effort addressed to describe the main horizontal structure/kinematic properties and their potential implication for the transport of sea-water properties.
  • Principally formed near the south-American coast where they locally impact the heat and salt budgets through lateral turbulent fluxes [Chaigneau and Pizarro, 2005b].
  • propagate seaward with translation velocities of few cm s-1 due to a combination of mean flow advection and self-propagation [Chaigneau and Pizarro, 2005c; Chaigneau et al., 2008; 2009].
  • In this new environment, eddies appear as anomalous water masses with surface or subsurface T/S anomalies [e.g. Johnson and McTaggart, 2010].
  • The westward propagation of CEs can also extend the area of high biological productivity offshore by both eddy chlorophyll advection and eddy nutrient pumping [Correa-Martinez et al., 2007].
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The CE core have typical T/S anomalies of ~-1°C/-0.1 (Chaigneau and Pizarro, 2005)

  • The AE core, located in the subthermocline contains anomalous signature of the ESSW originated from the PCU. These AEs show a subsurface radial velocity maximum and volume transports around the eddy centers were estimated to be on the order of 2 Sv (Johnson and McTaggart; 2010).
  • SUMMARY (Hormazabal et al., 2004; Chaigneau and Pizarro, 2005; Correa-Ramirez et al, 2007; Chaigneau et al., 2008; 2009)
  • The mean eddy surface characteristics (radius, vorticity, propagation velocity, lifetime)
  • Their propagation patterns (generation near the coast and propagation westward) and the temporal evolution of their mean properties
  • Their importance for the cross-shore transport of seawater properties from coastal regions to the offshore ocean