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CTS Prep Part One

CTS Prep Part One

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CTS Prep Part One

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  1. CTS PrepPart One

  2. Certified Technology Specialist Professionals • Know the “big picture” of the AV industry • Disciplines within the AV industry • Allied industries • AV project cycle • Know the technical scope of general projects Ch 1

  3. Systems Integrators Rental & StagingProfessionals Technology Managers Manufacturers IndependentConsultants Distributors PresentationProfessionals Value-addedDealers Disciplines within the AV Industry

  4. Mechanical/HVAC Ventilation, Fire Suppression Architectural Architecture, Interior Design, Carpentry Electrical Power, Infrastructure, Lighting Structural Structural Engineering, Rigging, Seismic Allied Industries

  5. The AV Project Cycle

  6. Technical Scope of General Projects • Boardroom • Auditorium • Training room • Divisible conference room

  7. Questions?

  8. Part One • Domain A: Creating AV Solutions • Gather Information • Needs Analysis • Site Survey • Maintain Awareness of Changes & Create Scope • Determine AV Solution Components

  9. Gather Information • Determine what the customer wants • Obtain scale drawings • Obtain customer budget • Obtain customer constraints (work hours, noise levels, cultural issues) Ch 11

  10. Domain A: Creating AV Solutions • Gather Information • Needs Analysis • Site Survey • Maintain Awareness of Changes & Create Scope • Determine AV Solution Components

  11. Needs Analysis • What is a needs analysis? • Why is it important? Form follows Function Ch 11 – Pg 191

  12. Needs Analysis • What information is needed? • Determine what the customer wants • Obtain scale drawings • Obtain customer budget • Obtain customer constraints (work hours, noise levels, cultural issues) • Determine the end user’s needs by determining the following. • The required application(s) based on the user’s needs • The tasks and functions that support the application • The wishes and desires of the end-user Ch 11 – Pg 191

  13. Gather Information • Needs Analysis Exercise • Facts to be conveyed. • How to be conveyed. • How it takes shape. Remember! No equipment discussions! Ch 11

  14. Domain A: Creating AV Solutions • Gather Information • Needs Analysis • Site Survey • Maintain Awareness of Changes & Create Scope • Determine AV Solution Components

  15. Evaluate Site Environment • Site Survey Exercise Ch 12 and 13

  16. Domain A: Creating AV Solutions • Gather Information • Needs Analysis • Site Survey • Maintain Awareness of Changes & Create Scope • Determine AV Solution Components

  17. Maintain Awareness of Changes, Develop a Functional AV Scope Exercises • Exercises • Maintain Awareness of Changes • Review potential changes in Chapter 14 of the CTS Exam Guide, Second Edition • Individually Develop a Functional AV Scope • Review the example of a scope in your student binders • Write a brief scope of you group’s project. • Present findings to contact (designated student) of the recommendations. Function End-Users' Needs Time Space Budget Applications Tasks Form Ch 14 and 15

  18. Domain A: Creating AV Solutions • Gather Information • Needs Analysis • Site Survey • Maintain Awareness of Changes & Create Scope • Determine AV Solution Components

  19. Determine AV solution components • Room Features • View-ability • Aspect Ratio • Projection Throw • Viewing Parameters • Audio • Project Documentation

  20. Rooms Features • Space for Presenter and Equipment • Location of Equipment • Space for the Audience • Accessibility to the Room • Accessibility to the Equipment • Control Room Size • Rear Projection Room Size • Doors • Finishes within the Room Ch 14

  21. Image View-ability Factors • Size • Shape • Target of vision (screen) • Obstructions • Brightness • Contrast Ch 5 and 14

  22. Aspect Ratio • Width dimension of a picture expressed relative to the height dimensions. • The aspect ratio of all broadcast composite video systems is 4 units wide by 3 units high , also written as 4:3 and 1.33 (analog). • The aspect ratio of HD can be 16 units wide by 9 units high also written as 16:9 and 1.78 Ch 5 – Pg 99

  23. Aspect Ratio Exercises

  24. Determine AV solution components • Room Features • View-ability • Aspect Ratio • Projection Throw • Viewing Parameters • Audio • Project Documentation

  25. Projection Throw • Projection Optics • Keystone • There are three dimensions to projector placement - all in relationship to the desired image dimensions and location • Use projector manual to determine location • Calculate Projection Throw Exercise

  26. Determine AV solution components • Room Features • View-ability • Aspect Ratio • Projection Throw • Viewing Parameters • Audio • Project Documentation

  27. Viewing Parameters • Perception Limitations • Viewing requirements of the Task • Text Size (or detail) to be displayed • Viewing Distances • Image (and hence screen) Height • Aspect Ratio of Image :

  28. Determining Image Size • The maximum viewing distance is based on the amount of detail we need to see in the image, not the resolution of the image. • What is the Task? • To View: General Viewing • To Read: Detail Viewing with Clues (like this slide) • To Inspect: Detail Viewing without Clues

  29. Reading (With Clues)

  30. Inspection (No Clues)

  31. Determining Image Size • Rules of Thumb: Image height equals the distance to the furthest viewer divided by: • 8 for General Viewing Tasks, • 6 for Detailed Viewing Tasks, or • 4 for Inspection Viewing Tasks.

  32. Required Image Height • Furthest Viewer is 24 feet away. • What is the image height for: • General Images? • Detailed Images? • Inspection Images?

  33. Required Image Height • Furthest Viewer is 32 feet away. • What is the image height for: • General Images? • Detailed Images? • Inspection Images?

  34. Character Height General Rule E height Maximum of 150 x height

  35. Image Width I.W. Nearest Viewer • How Close Can the Nearest Viewer Be? • The correct answer is? • The Image Width • First Row -- No closer to the Image than the width of the IMAGE

  36. Nearest Viewer • How Close Can the Nearest Viewer Be? • An additional criterion is based on the vertical angle of view 30° Max to Top of Image if possible. 15° Max to Center of Image if possible. 0

  37. Viewing Area • Where should the seats be (and where should they not be) for the image to be useful to the entire audience based on the required tasks?

  38. Viewing Angles On Axis On Axis 45° 45° 180 Viewing Angle 90 Viewing Angle

  39. Defining the Viewing Area • The best viewing is on axis to the image. • The maximum off-axis viewing angle will be dependent on the characteristics of the screen.

  40. Defining the Viewing Area • The widest viewing angles are provided by: • Direct-view displays • Matte white front projection screen material • Diffusion rear projection screens • High-gain projection screens can limit viewing angles

  41. 45 90 Defining the Viewing Area • The “good” viewing area is within 45 degrees of the projection axis or within a 90 degree viewing cone.

  42. 45 45 Defining the Viewing Area • The “acceptable” viewing areas are within 45 degrees of the edge of the image

  43. Determine AV solution components • Room Features • View-ability • Aspect Ratio • Projection Throw • Viewing Parameters • Audio • Project Documentation

  44. Audio • Types of Audio Systems • Speech Reinforcement (also: “Mix-Minus”) • Program Playback • Paging • Background Music • Noise Masking • Audio conference (also: Audio for VTC ) Ch 4 and 16

  45. Speech Reinforcement System • In order to work properly, a sound system must do three things: • It must be Loud Enough • It must be Intelligible • It must remain Stable Ch 16 – Pg 310

  46. Loud Enough • Achieves target level • 25 dB signal to noise • Same level to all ears +/- 3 dB • No perceived distortion (<1% THD) • Adequate electrical signal to noise (>60dB)

  47. Intelligible • Good direct to reflected (reverberant) ratio • Meets desired frequency response

  48. Stable • Allows sufficient gain before feedback with headroom

  49. Ohm’s Law • Expresses the relationships between Voltage, Current and Resistance in an electrical circuit • Helps calculate the Power in a circuit– if you know any 2 values, you can find the third one. Appendix C – Pg 546

  50. Ohm’s Law Appendix C – Pg 546