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OESA Young Leadership Council Having Effective Difficult Customer Conversations. Tom Doescher, President, Doescher Advisors. Have any of you experienced a difficult conversation? With a boss or co-worker? With your spouse or children? With a customer? Think of a situation.

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oesa young leadership council having effective difficult customer conversations

OESA Young Leadership CouncilHaving Effective Difficult Customer Conversations

Tom Doescher, President, Doescher Advisors

slide2

Have any of you experienced a difficult

conversation?

    • With a boss or co-worker?
    • With your spouse or children?
    • With a customer? Think of a situation.
  • Focus on what you have control over and remember that usually the customer has the final say:
    • OEM story.
    • Know yourself.
    • You can make a bad situation worse.
    • It is an art and a science.
1 get your game face on
1. Get Your Game Face On
  • Do you really want the customer?
  • Be alert to what may become a “Big Problem”:
    • Assume you will lose the customer if you don’t fix the problem.
    • Think fire alarm!
  • Be extremely engaged (i.e. LISTEN).
  • Assess whether you should move quickly or delay. Sometimes time will only make matters worse, while other times appropriately dragging your feet is best.
2 prepare your game plan
2. Prepare Your Game Plan
  • Do your homework on the issue (s).
  • Most customers like options.
  • Hone in on the real issue (the customer must haves).
  • Identify who specifically at the customer is at risk or will have a problem (e.g. will someone be embarrassed?)
  • Once you have determined the facts and preliminarily summarize your assessment, develop a clear, precise communications plan:
    • Be careful what you say and how you say it.
    • Script out your conversations.
    • Use neutral statements and words.
3 practice makes perfect
3. Practice Makes Perfect
  • Remember that these situations are often emotional.
  • Establish rational, logical arguments but also sympathize with and acknowledge the customer point of view.
  • Rehearse your communications with another colleague or if appropriate bring someone else into the discussion to help deliver the message.
  • Keep a dialogue with your best problem solvers as you gain more information and look for a compromise.
4 game time
4. Game Time
  • Do
    • Increase your time with the top customer contacts.
    • Be an active listener, take notes (send the message you are working to understand and help).
    • Be empathetic– demonstrate you understand their key messages. Repeat their key messages.
  • Don’t
    • Deliver tough messages through intermediaries.
    • Feel you need to answer or respond to everything.
    • Get into a debate.
    • Make accusations or challenge anyone’s integrity.
    • Over use technical jargon.
    • Hide behind a company rule or blame someone else.
slide7

Contact Information

    • tom.doescher@doescheradvisors.com
    • 248.701.5235
    • www.doescheradvisors.com

www.doescheradvisors.com

  • Book Recommendations
    • Getting to Yes by Roger Fisher & William Ury
    • Start with No by Jim Camp
    • Necessary Endings by Henry Cloud