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BCCO PCT #4 PowerPoint PowerPoint Presentation
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BCCO PCT #4 PowerPoint

BCCO PCT #4 PowerPoint

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BCCO PCT #4 PowerPoint

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  1. INTERACTING WITH DRIVERS WHO ARE DEAF or HARD of HEARING TCOLE Course # 7887 4 hrs AND UNIT ONE George D. Little Deputy Chief, TRAINING PCT#4 Bexar County BCCO PCT #4 PowerPoint BCCO PCT #4 PowerPoint

  2. WELCOME This course/lesson was directed by Constable Robert M. (Mike) BLOUNT. It is essential for all of my Deputy Constables to know protocols for how to respond to and assist deaf or hard of hearing drivers. It is imperative that all Deputy Constable’s assigned to our Agency become familiar with our NEW Standard Operating POLICY & PROCEDURES (SOP&P) that coincide with this course.. “KNOWLEDGE IS POWER”

  3. ADMINISTRATIVE • Please complete the BCCO PCT #4 Registration form and turn it in now. • Make sure you sign TCOLE Report of Training (PID#, Full Name and DOB). • All cell phones off please – pay attention to course materials and show common respect & courtesy.

  4. Your Instructor – Course Facilitator and Mentor Trainer Deputy Chief George D. Little A.S. & B.S. Criminal Justice & Sociology B.S.CJ Wayland Baptist University, San Antonio M.S. Criminology & Counter-Terrorism University of the State of New York(P) 2012 T.C.O.L.E. Professional Achievement Award Certified Crime Prevention Specialist (C.C.P.S.) TCOLE Basic Instructor Certificate 1984 TCOLE Advanced Instructor 2012 TCOLE Master Peace Officer 1991 MP Special Operations Operator Counter-Terrorism 1988 Military Police Investigations (MPI) & Criminal Investigation Division (CID) Special Agent Graduate Drug Enforcement Administration Academy 1977 44- years Law Enforcement Experience 40-Years Teaching & Instructor Experience FAMS CERTIFIEDINSTRUCTOR

  5. COURSE/LESSON OVERVIEW Unit Goal 1.0 Procedures for Interacting with Drivers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Unit Goal 2.0: Deaf and hard of hearing Specialty License Plates

  6. FORWARD Interacting with Drivers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

  7. UNIT ONE Unit Goal 1.0: Procedures for Interacting with Drivers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

  8. Learning Objectives Learning Objective 1.1: Participant will Define the terms “Deaf” and “Hard of hearing” as defined by Section 81.001 of the Texas Human Resource Code. Learning Objective 1.2 : Participant will explain appropriate techniques utilized to interact with drivers who are deaf or hard of hearing. Learning Objective 1.3 : Participant will Identify practical suggestions for more effectively communicating with drivers who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  9. Learning Objectives Learning Objective 1.4: Participant will explain the communication impediment program. Learning Objective 1.5 : Participant will distinguish what situations require an interpreter per student role-play.

  10. 1.0 Procedures for Interacting with Drivers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Law Enforcement Officers are in daily contact with all types of people. Considering that nearly 10% of the US population has some sort hearing loss.

  11. 1.0 Procedures for Interacting with Drivers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing – Cont’d It is reasonable to assume that some of those contacts would be with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, especially with the baby boomers reaching their senior years.

  12. 1.0 Procedures for Interacting with Drivers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing – Cont’d According to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), people who are deaf or hard of hearing should be given the same services provided to the other 90% of the population.

  13. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9aNpMRHH2c&feature=youtu.be (Select the below link and scroll down to video on Deaf and hard of hearing)

  14. http://www.ada.gov/policevideo/policebroadbandgallery.htm#Anchor-Part-21683http://www.ada.gov/policevideo/policebroadbandgallery.htm#Anchor-Part-21683

  15. QUESTIONS?

  16. 1.1 Define the terms “Deaf” and “Hard of hearing” as defined by Section 81.001 of the Texas Human Resource Code • “Deaf” means a hearing status of such severity that an individual must depend on visual methods to communicate.

  17. 1.1 Define the terms “Deaf” and “Hard of hearing” as defined by Section 81.001 of the Texas Human Resource Code – Cont’d • “Hard of hearing” means a hearing status that results in a loss of hearing function to an individual and in which the individual: • Relies on residual hearing; and • May depend on visual methods to communicate

  18. Thomas Edison Thomas Edison had severe hearing problems due to having scarlet fever when he was young. He often referred to himself as deaf, and he believed that his loss of hearing helped him to be a better scientist. • Age: Died at 84 (1847-1931) • Birthplace: Milan, Ohio, • Profession: Businessperson, Entrepreneur, Film Producer, Inventor, Scientist, + more

  19. Marlee Matlin Marlee Matlin became deaf when she was just 18 months old. She won an Academy Award for her performance in Children of a Lesser God. • Age: 50 • Birthplace: Morton Grove, USA, Illinois • Profession: Film Producer, Actor • Credits: Switched at Birth, The L Word, The Apprentice, Picket Fences & more

  20. Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven began to lose his hearing when he was 26 years old.  By the time he was 44, he was almost completely deaf. • Age: Died at 57 (1770-1827) • Birthplace: Bonn, Germany • Profession: Songwriter, Pianist, Musician, Lyricist, Composer, + more • Credits: Fantasia, Amour, Immortal Beloved, Impromptu, A Boy Named Charlie Brown, +

  21. Helen Keller Helen Keller was born with sight and hearing, but when she was 19 months old, she contracted a terrible illness that left her blind and deaf. • Age: Died at 88 (1880-1968) • Birthplace: Tuscumbia, Alabama, USA • Profession: Pacifist, Lecturer, Author • Credits:The Miracle Worker, Helen Keller in Her Story

  22. Shelley Beattie Body builder Shelley Beattie became deaf at age three because of an aspirin overdose. • Age: Died at 41 (1967-2008) • Birthplace: Santa Ana, California, USA • Profession: Bodybuilder

  23. Heather Whitestone Miss America 1995 Heather Whitestone lost her hearing when she was just 18 months old. She was the first deaf woman to ever win the Miss America title. • Age: 42 • Birthplace: Dothan, Alabama, USA • Profession: Deaf Advocate

  24. Shoshannah Stern "Weeds" actress Shoshannah Stern was born deaf. She is amongst the fourth generation of deafness in her family. • Age: 35 • Birthplace: Walnut Creek, CA • Profession: Actor • Credits: Jericho, The Last Shot, Threat Matrix, Adventures of Power, See What I'm Saying: The Deaf Entertainers Documentary, + more

  25. Laurent Clerc Deaf rights leader Laurent Clerc founded the first school for the deaf in 1817. • Age: Died at 84 (1785-1869) • Birthplace: La Balme-les- Grottes, France

  26. Phyllis Frelich Deaf actress Phyllis Frelich won a Tony award for her performance in the play Children Children of a Lesser God. • Age: Died at 70 (1944-2014) • Birthplace: Devils Lake, North Dakota, USA • Profession: Actor • Credits: Bridge to Silence, Love is Never Silent

  27. Sean Berdy Deaf actor Sean Berdy has appeared in The Sandlot 2 and Switched at Birth. • age: 22 • Birthplace: Boca Raton, Florida, USA • Profession: Actor • Credits: Switched at Birth, & The Sandlot 2

  28. Jim Kyte Jim Kyte is the first ever deaf player in the NHL. • Age: age 51 • Birthplace: Ottawa, Canada • Profession: Ice Hockey Player

  29. Katie Leclerc "Veronica Mars" actress Katie Leclerc has Ménière's disease, which contributes to her hearing loss. • Age: 29 • Birthplace: San Antonio, Texas, USA • Profession: Actor • Credits: Switched at Birth

  30. Halle Berry Oscar-winning actress Halle Berry lost 80% of hearing in her left ear after being beaten by ex-boyfriend Wesley Snipes when they were dating in the 1990s.

  31. Kristin Chenoweth Actress and singer Kristin Chenoweth has Meniere's disease, which causes progressive hearing loss.

  32. Lance Allred American basketball player Lance Allred was the first deaf person to play in the NBA.

  33. Linda Bove Actress Linda Bove played Linda the Librarian on Sesame Street, and introduced children to sign language.

  34. Class discussion the use of the terminology in reference to a deaf person. • “Deaf” is a term utilized to reference a member of the deaf community or deaf culture. • They are proud to be deaf and feel Deafness is a vital part of their identity, as much as ethnicity, gender, or religious background.

  35. Class discussion the use of the terminology in reference to a deaf person. – Cont’d • Hard of hearing is usually a term for people with a mild, moderate, or severe hearing loss. • Hard of hearing people often use speech as their primary mode of communication, but may be involved in the deaf community.

  36. Class discussion the use of the terminology in reference to a deaf person. – Cont’d • “Hearing impaired” is term that is considered highly offensive. • It is an outdated way to collectively label people with any level of hearing loss. • It does not account for their cultural identity.

  37. Class discussion the use of the terminology in reference to a deaf person. – Cont’d • This term can be interpreted as oppressive and meaning that something is wrong with them, that something needs to be fixed. • It is an inappropriate label.

  38. Class discussion the use of the terminology in reference to a deaf person. – Cont’d • So what is correct? • It is preferable to use the specific terms of deaf or hard of hearing.

  39. DEFINE & PROCESS Lesson Objective 1.0:Define the terms “Deaf” and “Hard of hearing” as defined by Section 81.001 of the Texas Human Resource Code Process: 39

  40. QUESTIONS

  41. TAKE 20-MINUTES

  42. 1.2Appropriate techniques to interact with drivers who are deaf or hard of hearing The U.S. Department of Justice has published a guide (“Communicating with People who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: ADA Guide for Law Enforcement Officers”) on how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) relates

  43. 1.2Appropriate techniques to interact with drivers who are deaf or hard of hearing – Cont’d to law enforcement and their duties. This guide contains recommendations on how to best serve the Deaf community, how to comply with the ADA, and training and situational scenarios.

  44. 1.2Appropriate techniques to interact with drivers who are deaf or hard of hearing – Cont’d The following are some excerpts taken directly from that guide. http://www.ada.gov/lawenfcomm.htm. U.S. Dept. of Justice is currently being updated. Please monitor this website for updated information as it is published

  45. 1.2 The ADA requires that: • Law Enforcement agencies must provide the communicationaids and services needed to communicate effectively with people who are deaf or hard of hearing, except when a particular aid or service would result in an undue burden or a fundamental

  46. 1.2 The ADA requires that: Cont’d change in the nature of the law enforcement services being provided. • Agencies must give primary consideration to providing the aid or service requested by the person with the hearing disability.

  47. 1.2 The ADA requires that: Cont’d • Agenciescannot charge the person for the communication aids or services provided. • Agenciesdo not have to provide personally prescribed devices such as hearing aids.

  48. 1.2 The ADA requires that: Cont’d • When interpreters are needed, agencies should provide interpreters who can interpret effectively, accurately, and impartially. • A legal certificate interpreter is the best source for this resource.

  49. Resource for Locating Interpreters Texas Dept. of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), http://www.dars.state.tx.us/dhhs/bei.shtm;

  50. The page cannot be found The page you are looking for might have been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable. Please try the following: • Make sure that the Web site address displayed • in the address bar of your browser is spelled and • formatted correctly. • If you reached this page by clicking a link, • contact the Web site administrator to alert them • that the link is incorrectly formatted. • Click theBackbutton to try another link. HTTP Error 404 - File or directory not found.Internet Information Services (IIS)