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France États -Unis Touraine Coffee Morning – June 15, 2019 PowerPoint Presentation
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France États -Unis Touraine Coffee Morning – June 15, 2019

France États -Unis Touraine Coffee Morning – June 15, 2019

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France États -Unis Touraine Coffee Morning – June 15, 2019

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  1. France États-Unis Touraine Coffee Morning – June 15, 2019 Tours & Minneapolis Sister Cities

  2. Why Minneapolis? • Why Minnesota? • Tours and Minneapolis are sister cities since 1991 • President of the Tours & Minneapolis Sister Cities association • I founded the association on July 4, 2017 • Its role is to promote the relationships between our two cities through cultural, educational and sport exchanges • We reach across the ocean to engage young and old alike to reinforce the bonds of friendship with Minnesotans • Current and upcoming projects include urban sketchers, women’s youth soccer and choir exchanges • http://tours-minneapolis.org/ • What comes to your mind when you hear ‘Minneapolis’?

  3. Upper Midwest, Great Lakes, and northern regions

  4. Minnesota - History The oldest human remains were found in Traverse Gap, close to BrownsValley, in 1933. They are carbon dated to about 9,000 years ago. Prior to the arrival of Europeans, present-day Minnesota was populated by a subculture of Sioux called the Dakota people. French explorers, missionaries, and fur traders (coureurs des bois and voyageurs) began exploring the region in the 17th century, encountering the Dakota and Ojibwe tribes. The first historical mention of the Ojibwe occurs in the French Jesuit Relation of 1640. Through their friendship with the French, the Ojibwe gained guns and forced the Sioux, Lakota and Fox out of present-day Michigan, northern Wisconsin, and Minnesota. A theory suggests that Viking sailors explored the Atlantic coast of North America down as far as the Bahamas as early as 985. This remains unproven. In 1898 a Swedish immigrant living near Kensington, OlofOhman, reported that he discovered a Runestone believed to have been carved by Norse explorers in 1362.

  5. France in the New World Beginning in the 17th century, France explored the Mississippi River valley and established scattered settlements in the region. By the middle of the 18th century, France controlled more of the present-day United States than any other European power. What was known at the time as the Louisiana Territory stretched from the Mississippi River in the east to the Rocky Mountains in the west (present-day Montana) and from the Gulf of Mexico in the south to the Canadian border in the north. It was purchased by the United States in 1803. In return for 15 million dollars, or 80 million French Francs, the Louisiana Purchase brought into the United States about 2,144,476 km² (828,000 square mi) of territory, thereby doubling the size of the young republic. Part or all of 15 states were eventually created from the land deal.

  6. Minnesota - French explorers Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut (c. 1639 – 25 February 1710) was a French soldier and explorer who is the first European known to have visited the area where the city of Duluth is now located and the headwaters of the Mississippi River (in 1674). His name is the namesake of Duluth, Minnesota as well as Duluth, Georgia. Father Louis Hennepin (12 May 1626 – 5 December 1704) was a Belgian Roman Catholic priest and missionary of the Franciscan Recollet order (French: Récollets) and an explorer of the interior of North America. Antoine Hennepin was born in Ath (present-day Hainaut, Belgium). In 1659, Béthune, the town where he lived, was captured by the army of Louis XIV of France. Louis XIV later sent him to the New World. René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle (November 22, 1643 – March 19, 1687) was a fur trader. He explored the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada, the Mississippi River, and the Gulf of Mexico. Joseph Nicolas Nicollet (July 24, 1786 – September 11, 1843) was a French geographer, astronomer, and mathematician known for mapping the Upper Mississippi River basin during the 1830s, primarily in Minnesota, South Dakota, and North Dakota. Nicollet's maps were among the most accurate of the time and they provided the basis for all subsequent maps of the American interior.

  7. Minnesota - History Following several territorial reorganizations, Minnesota in its current form was admitted as the country’s 32nd state on May 11, 1858. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, a large number of European immigrants, mainly from Scandinavia and Germany, began to settle the state. In recent decades, immigration from Asia, the Horn of Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America has broadened its demographic and cultural composition. In 2017, the ancestry groups claimed the most were: German (33.8%), Norwegian (15.3%), Irish (10.5%), Swedish (8.1%), English (5.4%), Polish (3,9 %) and French (3,1 %). Languages spoken at home English 88.87 % Spanish 3.82 % Hmong 1.18 % Vietnamese 0.45 % German 0.41 % French 0.29 %

  8. Minnesota - French heritage

  9. Rivers Cities and townsNative American reservations

  10. Minnesota - Facts Its official motto is ”L’Étoile du Nord” (Star of the North). It is known by the slogan the “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. Minnesota has 11,842 lakes of 10 acres or more, 15,291 lake basins. If all basins over 2.5 acres were counted, Minnesota would have 21,871 lakes. This has generated many repeat names. For example, there are more than 200 Mud Lakes, 150 Long Lakes, and 120 Rice Lakes. Minnesota’s lakes provide 44,926 miles of shoreline, more than the combined lake (32,000 mi) and coastal (3,427 mi) shorelines of California. Minnesota has 6,564 natural rivers and streams that cumulatively flow for 69,000 miles (111,000 km). The source of the Mississippi River is located at Lake Itasca.

  11. Minnesota - Facts • It is flat. Eagle Mountain is the highest natural point at 2,301 feet (701 m). • The geography of the state consists of • Forests in the southeast and the less populated North Woods, used for mining, forestry, and recreation • Western prairies now given over to intensive agriculture • It is the 12th largest in area and the 22nd most populous of the U.S. states.

  12. km2sq mi Inhabitants France 551,695 213,011 65,167,000 Minnesota 225,163 86,936 5,679,718 City Metro Minneapolis 425,403 3,629,190 St. Paul 309,180 Rochester 115,733 218,280 Duluth 86,265 279,452 Bloomington 85,856 -------------- ------------- 1,022,437 4,126,922 61% 8.5%

  13. km2sq mi Inhabitants France 551,695 213,011 65,167,000 Minnesota 225,163 86,936 5,679,718 City Metro Minneapolis 425,403 3,629,190 St. Paul 309,180 Rochester 115,733 218,280 Duluth 86,265 279,452 Bloomington 85,856 -------------- ------------- 1,022,437 4,126,922 About 65 percent of the state’s population! About 73 percent of the state’s population!

  14. Minnesota - Facts • It is flat. Eagle Mountain is the highest natural point at 2,301 feet (701 m). • The geography of the state consists of • Forests in the southeast and the less populated North Woods, used for mining, forestry, and recreation • Western prairies now given over to intensive agriculture • It is the 12th largest in area and the 22nd most populous of the U.S. states. • Minnesota’s standard of living index is among the highest in the United States. • The state is also among the best-educated and wealthiest in the nation. • The per capita personal income in 2016 was $51,990, ranking sixteenth in the nation. • The median household income in 2013 ranked eleventh in the nation at $60,900.

  15. Minnesota - Industry and commerce Minnesota’s earliest industries were fur trading, agriculture and resource extraction. The state is the U.S.’s largest producer of sugar beets, sweet corn, and green peas. The economy has heavily diversified in the past 200 years, shifting to finished products, services and finance. Food products: General Mills, Cargill, Hormel Foods Corporation, Land O' Lakes Retail: Target Corporation, Best Buy, Supervalu, Southdale Center Biomedical industry: St. Jude Medical, Mayo Clinic Health insurance: United-Health Group Financial institutions: U.S. Bancorp, TCF Bank, Ameriprise, Thrivent Financial for Lutherans. Others: 3M, Carlson, Hutchinson Technology

  16. Minnesota – State name The state Minnesota (/ˌmɪnɪˈsoʊtə/) comes from the Dakota phrase, "MnisotaMakoce" which means “land where the waters reflect the sky”, as a reference to the large number of lakes. Minnesota – River name The river Minnesota got its name from the Dakota word “Mnísóta” which means “cloudy water” (« couleur fumée blanche » ou « couleur ciel nuageux »). Native Americans demonstrated the name to early settlers by dropping milk into water and calling it “mnisota”. Many places in the state use the prefix “minne”, such as Minnehaha Falls (“curling water” or “waterfall”) Minneiska (“white water”) Minneota (“much water”) Minnetonka (“big water”) Minnetrista (“crooked water”) Minneapolis, a combination of “mni” and “polis”, the Greek word for “city”.

  17. Upper Midwest, Great Lakes, and northern regions Hennepin County

  18. Minneapolis (/ˌmɪniˈæpəlɪs/)

  19. Minneapolis (/ˌmɪniˈæpəlɪs/) Minneapolis lies on both banks of the Mississippi River, just north of the river’s confluence with the Minnesota River. With its neighbor Saint Paul, they and their suburbs are known collectively as the “Twin Cities” metropolitan area. The name Minneapolis is attributed to Charles Hoag, the city’s first schoolmaster, who combined “mni”, a Dakota Sioux word for water, and “polis”, the Greek word for “city”. Dakota Sioux were the region’s sole residents when French explorers arrived in 1680. In 1819, after the Louisiana Purchase, Fort Snelling was built by the United States Army. The Minnesota Territorial Legislature authorized Minneapolis as a town on the Mississippi’s west bank in 1856. Minneapolis then incorporated as a city in 1867. Its official motto is “En Avant” (Forward). The mayor-council government system is a so-called “weak mayor-council”.

  20. Weak-mayor form In a weak-mayor system, the mayor has no formal authority outside the council. The mayor cannot directly appoint or remove officials, and lacks veto power over council votes. As such, the mayor’s influence is solely based on personality in order to accomplish desired goals. Strong-mayor form The strong-mayor form of mayor-council government usually consists of an executive branch, a mayor elected by voters, and a unicameral council as the legislative branch. In the strong-mayor form the elected mayor is given almost total administrative authority and a clear, wide range of political independence, with the power to appoint and dismiss department heads without council approval and little or no public input. In this system, the strong-mayor prepares and administers the city budget, although that budget often must be approved by the council.

  21. Inhabitants 136,565 (2016) 425,403 (US: 46th) Metro 492,722 3,629,190(US: 16th) Area 34.36 km2 (13.27 sq mi) 148.89 km2 (57.49 sq mi) Sister cities 10 12 Braga (Portugal) since 1993 Bosaso (Somalia) since 2014 Minneapolis (USA) since 1991Najaf (Iraq) since 2009 Brașov (Romania) since 1990 Cuernavaca (Mexico) since 2008 Takamatsu (Japan) since 1988 Uppsala (Sweden) since 2000 Trois-Rivières (Canada) since 1987 Eldoret (Kenya) since 2000 Springfield (USA) since 1984 Harbin (China) since 1992 Luoyang (China) since 1982Tours (France) since 1991 Parma (Italy) since 1976 Novosibirsk (Russia) since 1988 Segovia (Spain) since 1972 Ibaraki (Japan) since 1980 Mülheim (Germany) since 1962 Kuopio (Finland) since 1972 Santiago (Chile) since 1961

  22. Minneapolis - Economy Logging, farming and milling were mainstays of its early economy. Minneapolis developed around Saint Anthony Falls, the highest waterfall on the Mississippi River. Forests in northern Minnesota were a valuable resource for the lumber industry. The Saint Anthony Falls was tapped to provide power for flour mills and sawmills. The Mississippi was ideal for transportation. By 1900, Minnesota mills were grinding 14.1 percent of the nation’s grain. Between 1880 and 1930 the city has been described as “the greatest direct-drive waterpower center the world has ever seen”. The city is also nicknamed the “Mill City”.

  23. Minneapolis - Economy The Minneapolis-St. Paul area is now the third largest economic center in the Midwest, behind Chicago and Detroit. 16 of the 500 biggest American companies (and 30 among the richest in the world) are headquarted in the city. The Southdale Center opened in 1956 and is the oldest fully enclosed, climate-controlled shopping mall in the United States. The Mall of America (locally known as “MOA”), opened in 1992, is the largest mall in the United States. The Mall of America has a floor area of 7,900,000 sq ft (730,000 m2), with 2,500,000 sq ft (230,000 m2) available as retail space. It counts 555 stores, 20,000 parking spaces, 30,000 plants and 300 trees, 1 mini golf, 1 indoor theme park with several roller coasters, 1 sea life aquarium (with over 4,500 sea creatures including sharks, turtles, stingrays and many more). Furthermore, it welcomes 400 events and 42 millions visitors per year.

  24. Minneapolis - Parks and recreation The city is abundantly rich in water, with 22 lakes, wetlands, the Mississippi River, creeks and waterfalls. It is nicknamed “City of Lakes”. It counts 320 km (200 mi) of paths for pedestrians and bicycles. The “Grand Rounds National Scenic Byway” is a linked series of park areas along about 80 km (50 mi) of roadway.

  25. Minneapolis – University The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (the U of M) is a public research university in Minneapolis and Saint Paul. It has the sixth-largest main campus student body in the United States, with 50,943 students in 2018-19, and is organized into 19 colleges and schools. It is regularly ranked among the world’s top 30 universities by the “Shanghaï Academic Ranking of World Universities” (which references 1,000 universities). In 2012, it is ranked 12th in mathematics, 13th in medicine and pharmacy, 25th in law, and 25th in technology and engineering. The University of Minnesota faculty, alumni, and researchers have won 30 Nobel Prizes and three Pulitzer Prizes. Notable University of Minnesota alumni include two Vice Presidents of the United States, Hubert Humphrey and Walter Mondale, and Bob Dylan, who received the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature.

  26. Tours & Minneapolis Sister Cities Visit our website: http://tours-minneapolis.org/ Find more about Minnesota and Minneapolis: http://tours-minneapolis.org/le-minnesota/ http://tours-minneapolis.org/minneapolis/

  27. Urban sketchers June 1-6, 2018 May 31-June 5, 2019 http://tours-minneapolis.org/urban-sketchers/

  28. http://tours-minneapolis.org/aquatennial-2018/

  29. France États-Unis Touraine Coffee Morning – June 15, 2019 Tours & Minneapolis Sister Cities