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SA’s crime profile & implications of border control for crime and crime combating March 2011 PowerPoint Presentation
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SA’s crime profile & implications of border control for crime and crime combating March 2011

SA’s crime profile & implications of border control for crime and crime combating March 2011

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SA’s crime profile & implications of border control for crime and crime combating March 2011

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  1. SA’s crime profile & implications of border control for crime and crime combating March 2011 JOHAN BURGER Crime & Justice Programme INSTITUTE FOR SECURITY STUDIES

  2. Presentation Outline • Crime & border security • Perceptions of crime • SA’s crime profile • Some provincial crime profiles • Crime combating • Conclusion

  3. Crime and border security ‘Crime is no longer bound by borders …The planet has been reduced to the size of a computer screen and the artificial borders which we once called nations have, for all intents and purposes, begun to evaporate’ ‘International organised crime gangs have formed alliances not unlike those of the corporate world. These unholy alliances provide criminal groups with more power, more leverage, [and] more ill-gotten gains … The bad guys have all the money and no rules. The good guys have all the rules and no money’ Jeffrey Robinson,The Merger: The Conglomeration of International Organised Crime, New York: The Overlook Press, 2000

  4. RSA (Island of opportunity?) Crime as a threat to our national security: internally and externally

  5. Public & media perceptions of crime in SA

  6. SAPS: 20 most serious crimes recorded 1994/95 – 2009/10

  7. Perspective on overall increase in crime levels between 2007/08 -2009/10 • Total crime levels increased by 4% over the last two years (after consistent decline of 25% between 2002/03 – 2007/08). This is driven by increase in five property/commercial crime categories: • Shoplifting +32% (21 642 cases) • Commercial crime +30% (19 556 cases) [Since 2004/05 absolute numbers increased by 57%] • Residential burglary +8% (18 724) • Non-residential or business burglary +14% (8 778 cases) • Theft out of motor vehicle +8% (9 201 cases)

  8. Residential and Business Burglary Trends 2003/04 – 2009/10 (rates per 100 000)

  9. Crimes against business 2003/04 – 2009/10 Real figures +337% Rates per 100 000

  10. Murder & Attempted Murder trend 1994/95 – 2009/10 (rates per 100 000)

  11. Aggravated Robbery trend 1994/95 – 2009/10 (rates per 100 000) +40%

  12. Trio crimes 2002/03 – 2009/10

  13. Bank & CIT Robberies1994/95 – 2009/10 Bank robbery -83%

  14. ATM Attacks 2004 - 2010 447 SABRIC figures 368 ? ± 360 288 82 30 37

  15. Scene at an ATM bombing

  16. Violent crime trends in Limpopo 2003/04 – 2009/10 (rates per 100 000) (762) (690) (630) (584) (191) (150)

  17. Violent crime trends in Western Cape 2003/04 – 2009/10

  18. Business robbery: Provincial breakdown

  19. Car hijacking: Provincial breakdown

  20. Combating (fighting) crime Crime prevention Long-term interventions Other interv. (other Depts) Policing Short-term interventions Private security • Socio-economic interventions • (social crime prevention) • Crime prevention through environ- • mental design • Deterrence through effective • Criminal Justice System • Proactive Policing • Visible • policing • Law enforce- • ment • Order main- • tenance • Reactive Policing • Crime investi- • gation • Law enforce- • ment • Order restora- • tion Information Arrests Deterrence

  21. Border control (in its wider meaning) can only be meaningful if it is managed as part of an integrated approach to the fight against crime and the maintenance of an orderly society. There will always be those who break the law, some by their ignorance, some by accident and some because they intend to. Similarly weaknesses in border control are exploited by both those in search of a better life, and by those involved in criminal activity. Therefore any effort to fight crime and lawlessness can only be successful if it includes effective border control as a crucial element in the overall strategic approach. Finally, it is obvious that to be successful in the fight against crime we need much more than the individual efforts of state departments – we need clear role identification, structured cooperation and coordination, and an overarching national policy and strategy to guide all of these. Conclusion www.issafrica.org

  22. THANK YOU / DANKIE JOHAN BURGER Tel 012 346 9500 jburger@issafrica.org www.issafrica.org